W...O...W. I never could've guessed replacing my HDD would be so difficult. MANY Qs!

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by mattcube64, Mar 23, 2007.

  1. mattcube64 macrumors 65816

    mattcube64

    Joined:
    May 21, 2006
    Location:
    Missouri
    #1
    So, wow. I've already posted multiple threads asking for help, and here I am again.

    First, I finally got my WD 160GB in my Macbook to replace my 60gig stock drive. Well, when I boot up, I get a question mark folder for just a few seconds, then the Apple logo, then my computer boots into OSX no problem. Why is the Question Mark folder appearing? I used SuperDuper to copy the drive, does that have anything to do with it? Do I need to do a fresh install?

    Secondly, the 60gig drive was put into a Macally external USB enclosure. It worked fine at first. Then, out of nowhere (It's been a day) the disk wouldn't spin up. I assumed the enclosure broke. But I put the 60gig back into my Macbook, and it didn't load up the OS. So, I booted up from disc, and tried Disk Utility. Disk Utility doesn't even see the drive.

    So, can I assume that the original 60 gig drive is dead? Does this have something to do with putting it in the enclosure? Or is it just coincidence? If it is dead, can I send it in to Apple by itself? I can wait a few days to get it back since I have my new drive, I just don't feel like driving an hour to the Apple store twice. Will Apple give me a hard time? I plan on ignoring the fact I replaced it, to avoid blame being put on me.

    All input appreciated.
     
  2. TheAnswer macrumors 68030

    TheAnswer

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2002
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    #2
    The question mark in your new drive is probably just a matter of going to Apple Menu > System Preferences > Startup Disk...then selecting the System Folder you want to use to bootup.
     
  3. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #3
    ...And replacing a drive can be stressful on the platters. There's a reasonable chance that all this moving around has upset their balance and subsequently broken the drive. I'm not sure that Apple'll help on this one, but feel free to give it a try anyway. :eek:
     
  4. Shadow macrumors 68000

    Shadow

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2006
    Location:
    Keele, United Kingdom
    #4
    So how are you supposed to ship them?
     
  5. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #5
    Carefully, and in bubble wrap or a sculpted box.



    Sculpted box. Hehe, that's dirty. :)
     
  6. mattcube64 thread starter macrumors 65816

    mattcube64

    Joined:
    May 21, 2006
    Location:
    Missouri
    #6
    Well knowing there's an equally reasonable chance that moving them around did not cause the problem, I'd probably just ingnore that I removed the drive in the first place, and just say it went bad.

    Apple's support site says I can call Applecare, but I'm past the 90 days. Does that mean I can't call and order a DIY replacement part? That's really stupid.
     
  7. Mattydj macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #7
    Theres nothing wrong with getting the question mark before the apple sign. It's just your computer looking for the disk to startup from. Click "Startup Disk" in system preferences and select your OSX install as said previously.

    My macbook did that when i installed bootcamp for the first time. ^Doing that fixed it^
     
  8. ElectricSheep macrumors 6502

    ElectricSheep

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Location:
    Wilmington, DE
    #8
    The mechanicals of a modern hard disk have a shock tolerance in excess of 150 times the force of gravity. Many exceed that rating and can withstand shocks greater than 800 Gs. You are far more likely to damage the electronic components with an electro-static discharge than damaging the platters from handling.

    Its possible you got an inferior USB enclosure that didn't play nicely with your hard disk.
     
  9. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #9

    Interesting statistic and I don't doubt the rating for a minute, but you'd think with those sorts of qualifications we'd have less trouble with hard drive-based iPods blinking out. Anyway, I'm not saying that handling the drive necessarily broke it, I'm just saying it is a possibility and can be used as an excuse by Apple to not help you. ;)
     
  10. PatrickF macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Location:
    Blighty
    #10
    As has already been pointed out, it's very unlikely that you'll damage the platters from moving a drive while the drive is not powered, as the read/write heads will have parked off the platters.

    Damage is more likely to occur when you shake a drive that is powered, as the read/write heads are hovering right above the platters and those can scratch the surface of the platters.

    When the heads are parked it's VERY unlikely that you'll damage the platters.
     

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