Wanna feel inadequate? or What have you done with your life?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by mactastic, Aug 26, 2003.

  1. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #1
    Link

     
  2. XnavxeMiyyep macrumors 65816

    XnavxeMiyyep

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Washington
    #2
    What have I done with my life? Well, so far, I've enjoyed it and had fun.:D I take some advanced classes, but I wouldn't want to dedicate my life entirely to education.
     
  3. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #3
    Pretty amazing - its good to see that he's trying to do something and I'm not sure if I'd want the pressure that he must feel at times.

    But its people like him who have a better chance at making a difference by seeing things in different ways and coming up with unique solutions to problems.

    I wish him the best of luck! :D

    D
     
  4. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #4
    yeah, I heard about this a few months ago. Saw it in 'Trib.

    This is truly amazing. I started college at 15, which is early, but this is incredible. This kid is brilliant.

    But the guy who is the youngest to snag an MD, an Indian, got arrested in India for beating his wife. even served some time. So I hope our young MD/PhD friend will turn out better.

    There are certainly many, many unbelievable opportunities not only for him, but for the research projects he chooses to advance and the patients who come to him for help.
     
  5. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #6
    An amazing story and I know that his parents must be proud. His parents need to be there for him ans be supportive. It is a blessing and a curse. I wish him well in his studies. Hopefully he will discover something that will be beneficial to mankind. At times a genius mind can be a social retard, no common sense. Or even worse to be like John Nash and suffer from schizophrenia.
     
  6. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2002
    Location:
    Alabama
    #7
    Freak.
    Of course I say that because I'm a freakin' dumbass. I wish him well.
     
  7. arn macrumors god

    arn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2001
    #8
    that's nice and all... and it's an amazing accomplishment, sure....

    but seriously, this kid is going to be screwed up socially.

    He can't have any friends... his "peers" are 22-30 years old.

    I'm anti-grade-skipping. :) In this case, obviously there probably wasn't much choice since he's so advanced... but still - I think school is more about learning social skills and interactions as it is learning book-stuff.

    arn
     
  8. tazo macrumors 68040

    tazo

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, Seattle, WA actually
    #9
    I read that article in the Seattle times the other day, and although its great the kid will be president at 15, ;) , I think the Times trying to cover up what is a prodigy, by saying oh "he gets into fights with his sister sometimes.."

    the kid is not normal, I dont understand why a writer would try to convey such a sense.

    200 IQ? Lets just all remember that IQ doesnt always make someone smart. That is to say, for this world.

    -tazo
     
  9. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #10
    There is definitely a balance to be stricken. This kid is an anomaly, no doubt.

    But in general, for students who are not being challenged, a little grade skipping is quite all right. I skipped two grades, and I think that that's a comfortable number, because it doesn't throw you completely out of the loop as far as social interaction goes.

    Despite my age, I have many friends, most of whom are 2 or 3 years older than me. I'm involved in leadership stuff, etc., and nobody seems to really think that my age is a big deal.

    If grade-skipping occurs early on and the person has time to mature (and starts out BEING adequately mature), grade skipping can be a way to help a person grow both intellectually AND socially. I feel more comfortable, in general, interacting with people a few years older than me.

    The problem with not skipping grades is that one can grow tired of institutionalized learning (and learning in general) because it gets boring. If you're already a whiz at the level where you should be, what's the motivation to strive to do well? That leads to carelessness and apathy, and students who DON'T skip grades when they probably should often end up falling right at average instead of way above as you would expect.

    Like I said, there needs to be a balance. I felt that two grades (skipped during elementary school, mind you), were enough for me. For others it might be more or less.

    This kid is definitely going to have problems socially because the difference is way too great to cope. But for someone with an intellect and drive like his, it might be a good thing.

    Anyway, the way I see it, by the time you hit 27 or 28, you'll be working with a broad age-range of people, and age won't matter as much. He'll find a nice Chinese lab assistant, get married, have kids, win a few Nobels, cure a few diseases, and live a pretty, well, normal life. :D
     
  10. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #11
    It will be important for him to take some classes with his peers. He should have time to just be a kid. Planned activities with his peers!
     
  11. Moxiemike macrumors 68020

    Moxiemike

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #12
    Wouldn't Change a Thing. :)

    That's all well and good-- but I wouldn't change a thing about my life.

    I had a nice upbringing without TV, learned computers early on. Read a lot of GREAT literature. Learned to play bass at age 10, photography at 14, have been to Europe several times, was lucky to attend both a traditional university (for psychology) and a non-tradtional tech school (for graphic design), work at many unique places, start my own business which is fairly sucessful, live in some unique places, play in great bands (including a band that second-staged at lilith fair long ago where I met jewel and sarah mclachlan amongst others).

    Since then, I've been helping market iStockPro.com, in the process selling many shots, worked at a club as their designer and house photographer, started a new band with some fantastic musicians and people, learned digital recording, am prepping a single to be released on iTMS among other things, own a great Mac system that allows me to do everything I was with my photography, music and design, drive around in a series of great cars, have a series of fun relationships with beautiful women who have taught me lots about life and love, learned alot about human relationships, interactions, philosophy, art, music, theatre, comedy, performance, etc etc etc.

    And now, this new band (omolara) seems to be going somewhere, my photography keeps getting better, i feel more confortable every day, i've met a fantastic new girl who is very sweet, kind and fun.

    Add to that my fantastic style, my ability to party and be open minded with people of all sorts.... i dunno. I just feel so much more well-adjusted and learned than some kid who is being pushed on a narrow track at age 12. :)

    And I keep growing everyday. I don't condone the kid... but i wouldn't trade him for sure.

    It's one thing to be a spectator, and I know so so so many who have all of these great ideas but lack confidence and the verve to make them reality.

    I'm a PARTICIPANT. I live life. I don't whine about my job, I don't whine about women, the lack of a social scene, how my friends do too many drugs.

    I live life. I experience it. Even when watching stuff, I try to immerse myself in it. It's a great philosophy for life and allows me to have fun all the time, doing whatever. :)

    hehe. I know some people who could take a cue from me.... but they're more interested in holding grudges than living.

    People are fascinating. :)
     
  12. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #13
    Moxiemike--

    I noticed a few subtle plugs in your post, am I right? :D

    But seriously, it sounds like you've got a great life, but don't necessarily assume that it is superior to this kid's situation.

    He'll definitely have struggles, but he'll get his life experience down the line.

    Just because he's growing up fast, it doesn't mean that he won't have the same time (hopefully) to live and to learn, and hopefully to teach others.

    I imagine he does have a participant life style. He might not have in the sense of going out to clubs or having a girlfriend or what not, but such things might not be important to him. Doing DNA research at 10, that's participant. Having the opportunity to do more research, groundbreaking even, will be participant. And helping people as a medical doctor, that will be very participant.

    His experiences may be different from others' and may occur at a different time, but he'll have his chance to love and lose and to rejoice and despair. Just wait until his hormones kick in.

    The only thing one would have to worry about is that a person like this may do things in extremes. I mean, when he hits puberty, what if he REALLY hits puberty? Quits school, marries some random girl, etc. It's his life, of course, and he should enjoy it, but making a few bad decisions like that could have a devastating effect.

    The point is, his real worry should be getting too big for his britches, as they would say down South. His great deal of intellectual knowledge should not make him believe that he does not need to consider the advice of those with a great deal of life experience.
     
  13. Moxiemike macrumors 68020

    Moxiemike

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #14
    I didn't mean to suggest that he's not a participant-- doing what he's doing is, in essence, a participant based lifestyle. It's narrow in focus, which is just a different path.

    I was more referring to a lot of people :D I run into who are afraid to live life and blame all their fears and lack of confidence on others.

    And about him "being too big for his britches" you're exactly right. Along with all of the stuff i've done, i've learned how to mess up royally and admit it.

    I've learned that humility is often the best policy. As much as i've done, and i'm VERY proud of my accomplishments, i'm also very aware that there is much to learn.

    And that even though I think i'm VERY good at the things I do, I realize there are a million people who are better and a million who are worse. :)

    I like your comment about the kid making some bad decisions. It's true. and I think that it remains to be seen if he could react to a bad decision or a some sort of roadblock-- is his education teaching him that? So yea. It's all a toss-up.

    But I surely wouldn't wanna be in his shoes. :) But that's just me.

    and yes, lots of shamless plugs. I am in marketing and design after all. ;)
     
  14. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #15
    I'm with you. I don't think I'd want to be in his shoes, to tell you the truth. I'm happy where I am, and though I want to follow a similar educational path to what he is doing, I think I'll be all right finishing a little bit (7 years) later. ;)

    And shameless plugs are good. My dad is a marketing prof, so I'm used to not looking down on them, but praising them.
     
  15. MacAztec macrumors 68040

    MacAztec

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2001
    Location:
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    #16
    Weird...

    Thats cool and all, but that is also very weird. It would suck to not really have fun and easy classes. When I was twelve, I enjoyed going to junior high because it was a breeze, and it was easy.

    Highschool is the same, only its better socially :)

    That would just suck, what the hell is he going to do for the next 60 years of his life? Most people that go to college get out at 22-26+ years old, then go and find a job and a partner.

    But getting out at 19....bleh
     
  16. Moxiemike macrumors 68020

    Moxiemike

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #17
    Exactly. The thing to remember is life isn't so much of a sprint as it is a jog!

    I'd rather see the scenery and get to the finish line with memories than to race to the finish and not have lived. ;)

    And yes... the plugs are good. EVERYONE should check out iStockpro.com

    Amazing photos from a group of highly talented photographers.

    I'm honored to be a member-- they just won't accept anyone, you have to have a lot of skill and creativity, as well as techical knowledge. It feels good to know that others feel the same way about my work—especially people with the eye to know good work from crappy work. :)
     
  17. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #19
    His peers are med-school-aged students. I am sure that he would feel bored interacting with his far-less-mature fellow 12-year-olds, even embarrassed to be associated with them.

    No, his vast intellectual superiority to those of his age probably comes with a considerably greater level of maturity. And if that is the case, his true peers are those who share his level of mental maturity.

    It is most unfortunate, but in his case, he has no true peers. Those who he would spend time with because physical capability, legal limitations, and age-connected interests would have it, are simply unsatisfactory because of their maturity. Those on his level intellectually and maturity-wise have vastly different interests, physical capabilities, and legal limitations, which prevent them from full association with him. In short, he's too smart for some, and too young for others.
     
  18. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #20
    We could use iBookin's 2 cents in this discussion.
     
  19. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #21
    has he skipped grades, too?
     
  20. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #22
    I know that iBookin is taking college classes while in High School!
     
  21. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #23
    awesome!I didn't know that he was taking college classes, but you're right, iBookin would definitely have a great perspective on this whole matter.
     
  22. AppleMatt macrumors 68000

    AppleMatt

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #25
    It's interesting, quite an achievement, but I agree with arn, I think there are serious social issues to consider.

    Those aside, I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the physical side over the mental. At 12 he is far from fully developed, he has yet to even hit puberty. The brain undergoes a bigger change (both physically regarding sizes and densities of certain areas and neurochemicals) during puberty than any other time in life. It's also a lot of mental pressure, not just succeeding but also facing the realities of modern medicine. Has he any clinical experience or did they just "throw him in"?

    I've never skipped years (they don't really do that in the UK), but I am doing an extra degree alongside medicine, it adds a year to my course but it adds three more letters after my name :cool:.

    AppleMatt
     

Share This Page