Warning! There are nuts in peanuts

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by afd, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. afd
    macrumors 6502a

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    Scotland
    #1
    BBC reporting that peanuts had to be withdrawn because they contain peanuts.

    Nuts. Just nuts.
     
  2. macrumors demi-god

    Shrink

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    New England, USA
    #2
    See my sig...:p
     
  3. afd
    thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    He was right. I don't think that anyone with a peanut allergy that doesn't care enough to find out what they are is going to be missed.
     
  4. macrumors demi-god

    Gav2k

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    #4
    It's not nuts its the law ;)
     
  5. afd
    thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Same thing sometimes.
     
  6. macrumors 65816

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    Jan 31, 2010
    #6
    Technically a peanut isn't actually a nut at all: its a legume or "bean."

    Peanut and other Food Allergies are increasingly common, and the results to a person so afflicted consuming them are terrifying, and can be fatal:

    So, yes: It does seem sorta common-sense that something labelled "Monkey Nuts" would have peanuts in them. But it is important for general food safety regulations that they be applied consistently. If someone selling a whole bag of peanuts can get away without adequately labeling them, why do we hold people selling products containing just a trace to a different standard?

    We can all have a good laugh about the absurdity of this sort of thing. But as far as I'm concerned, its just evidence that our food safety system is (sorta) working as it should.
     
  7. macrumors 601

    Plutonius

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    #7
    I don't understand why airlines are banning peanuts but allowing pets to fly on the plane in the passenger area ? While not as quick acting as a peanut allergy, a pet allergy can be just as bad with a long time exposure. The air is circulated around the cabin so you are affected no matter where they put the pet in the passenger cabin.
     
  8. macrumors 601

    eawmp1

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    FL
    #8
    Peanut-tainted simian testicles :eek:
     
  9. macrumors demi-god

    Shrink

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    #9
    Yup...the low road again...:p

    ;) :D
     
  10. macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #10
    Wait!

    I didn't know monkey nuts contain peanuts!

    Do my nuts contain peanuts, too?
     
  11. macrumors demi-god

    Shrink

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    #11
    Yes, of course they do, Dear Boy.

    You can go lie down now and rest.

    It will be good for you.

    OMG!!!

    :eek: :rolleyes:
     
  12. macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    #12
    That is simply malarky. Peanuts can kill those who are allergic. Pet allergies simply are an annoyance. Anaphylactic shock (death) vs. a runny nose and itchy eyes. Also, with airlines banning sharp objects, an eninephrine injection device to prevent peanut-related death would not be possible, while allergy medication for pet allergies is perfectly feasible.
     
  13. macrumors regular

    Joined:
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    Denmark
    #13
    You obviously does not suffer from allergy from pets.
    Some of us, gets sick for a couple of days, how fair is it that my vacation is gonna be ruined by old ladys little "fluffy". Yes it may "only" be an annoyance in your eyes, but scratching all over the body, constantly, and having trouble breathing is not as fun as it sounds, and it's not always it just will go away by pills.

    And you can get a dispensation for an eninephrine injector. I know it, my mom does..

    If you suffer from allergies, simply ask whats in the food, or check it your self. I'm allergic to some foods, and I simply ask, and hey, it doesn't need to be banned, because I use my logic....
    If the staff simply cannot answer my question, theres always something else to eat..
     
  14. macrumors Core

    Jaffa Cake

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    #14
    You can take such a device onto a plane, as long as you notify the security check people and have written authorisation signed by you doctor. I've taken syringes on planes myself this way without any problems at all.

    That being said, it's still prudent to try and prevent a potentially fatal nut allergy situation in the first place of course.
     
  15. macrumors demi-god

    Gav2k

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    #15
    Epi pens are allowed
     
  16. macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    Peanuts are also allowed, at least in the US. All of the airlines I usually fly still serve them but give passengers a choice.
     
  17. macrumors regular

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    Jul 1, 2012
    #17
    +1 Well said
     
  18. macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    #18
    Ok, I was wrong about the epipen. However, that does not change the fact that a peanut allergy is potentially fatal while pet/dander allergies are not. To those who say a pet allergy is as bad as a peanut allergy, you are biased due to your own circumstances. I, personally, do not have a single food allergy or pet allergy, but I have family members who suffer from both. Thus, I believe myself to be impartial to the argument.

    My brother almost died from ingesting something containing peanuts, and my parents' sinuses are affected greatly when in the presence of pet dander. Which is worse? I think you know.

    Also for what it's worth, don't airplanes have air filters which can filter out airborne particles? If so, this discussion is useless.
     
  19. macrumors demi-god

    Gav2k

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    #19
    It's not just airborne that I would find an issue. My son has problems with cat hair. It triggers his asthma.
     
  20. macrumors 68040

    AlphaDogg

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    #20
    If he touches cat hair, he starts coughing? Something seems off here.

    I'm not sure you understand what airborne means.

    Also, one last time: asthma>death. Coughing>death. Itching>death. Sneezing>death. Hard time breathing>death. IT'S DEATH, PEOPLE!
     
  21. macrumors demi-god

    Gav2k

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    #21
    Yes I understand what airborne is! If my son was to sit in a seat previously occupied by a cat he would start coughing then is asthma would start. Yes maybe some particles may be kicked up but its still not acceptable.
     
  22. macrumors 68000

    thewitt

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    Sep 13, 2011
    #22
    Just FYI, you should know its not cat hair, it's the dried saliva that people have reactions to.
     
  23. macrumors 601

    Plutonius

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    New Hampshire
    #23
    I'm glad you are so knowledgeable :p. One to two hours of contact with a cat means I nearly stop breathing and need immediate medical assistance. For many people it isn't just runny noses and itchy eyes. Peanut allergies are more serious (no arguments there) since the effects are immediate but, pet allergies can be just as dangerous to people for long term exposure (being stuck near one for the duration of a plane flight).
     
  24. macrumors 603

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    #24
    What it really boils down is:
    1) there are far more people with a potentially fatal reaction to peanuts than to cats.
    2) there are far more peanuts on planes, (schools, restaurants, kitchens, stores) than cats.
    3) it is not just the peanuts on a particular flight than cause the reaction, but also any peanut debris from previous flights. If a tiny bit of peanut is smeared on the side of the tray table it's easy to get some on your fingers while pulling it out. From there it goes gets onto the fork, for instance, when you pull it out of the wrapper, and then a tiny bit of peanut residue gets into your mouth. If you are very sensitive you now start your reaction.

    I have sympathy for you though, as I understand that allergies to cats can also be severe. But these are far more uncommon and the persistence is not generally as great. Most people who are allergic to animals generally have to be close to the animal. If you have a pet allergy and you are sitting next to a pet carrier you can see the contagion. Ask to be moved. If the flight attendant is reluctant to move you, tell them to warn the captain they may be making an urgent unscheduled landing about half way through the flight for medical reasons. My friend tells me that usually gets their attention, though you need to back this up with a physician prescribed medication. If you are that sensitive then you need to be prepared as well.

    I do not have severe allergies, but I have enough friends who do.
     
  25. macrumors 601

    Plutonius

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    #25
    I actually know many more people who would suffer a medical emergency with extended contact with animals then are allergic to peanuts. It is not as uncommon as you think it is and the main reason you don't hear about it is that it's more easily controlled (it takes a longer exposure). No arguments with you though that a peanut allergy is much more dangerous.

    As far as changing seats in the plane, there was a story last year (or the year before) of a passenger with cat allergies being seated next to someone with a cat. They air crew refused to move anyone even after being made aware of the extreme cat alleges and the passenger required medical assistance when the plan reached it's destination. Can you really expect the airlines to do the right thing about allergies when they have made passengers sit on the tarmac for 12 hours before takeoff, etc.
     

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