weetarded apartment

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by farqueue, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. farqueue macrumors 6502

    farqueue

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    #1
    hello, i am no tv expeert. recently moved into my new apartment to suddenly have found these ports instead of the standard normal TV jack... i cant seem to find anything that i can plug into it to watch tv

    pics here
    [​IMG]


    on top it says FTA, at bottom it says SAT...
    what kind of converter do i need???

    its like i need an adaptor to screw on etc..



    ok now for photos taken with my isight (above - crappy photos taken by motorola v3 razr)

    OK LADS, went down to the local electronic store and they dont even know what i'm talking about

    here are more pictures taken with my iSight on my macbook :)
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  2. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #2
    What country are you in?

    They look like the standard coaxial connections to me.
     
  3. farqueue thread starter macrumors 6502

    farqueue

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    #3
    hello, i am from new zealand/.

    its something i have to screw on, in nz, most of the tv antennas that we plug into dont require any srewing

    btw, any ideas what those two words mean?
     
  4. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #4
    FTA = 'Free To Air'
    SAT is short for Satellite

    Unfortunately, I have no idea what type of adaptor you would need because I do not know what your normal connection would be.
     
  5. TBi macrumors 68030

    TBi

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #5
    Free To Air
    and
    Satelite

    I'm guessing they are digital connections (or analog satelite ones), reminiscent of the satelite connections on the back of my Sky box.

    Ask your landlord.

    Oh and most electronic/electrical/tv shops will have the necessary converters.
     
  6. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    #6
    Just to empathise with farqueue (brilliant user name by the way) we here in Aus/NZ don't have all this fancy cable box stuff, our free-to-air TV comes in over antennae that plug straight into the TV via a coax cable (no screwing in required, it's just a plug) and all the rest just uses composite/component/HDMI cables.

    I'm unsure about the new digital Pay TV stuff as nobody really uses it (too expensive and all the good TV is on free-to-air). Maybe it would use a screw in connector.

    Come to think of it, I think the Pay TV stuff does use a screw in connection but free to air is just a plug-in coax cable from the antenna.
     
  7. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #7
    You pretty much just described the US also (with the exception of good free television). :(
     
  8. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #8
    You need Co-Ax cables with male F-Type connectors for those.
     
  9. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    #9
    Pay TV here is only good for sports coverage for obscure overseas events and rugby/rugby league replays as well as documentaries and movies.

    Everything else (and I mean everything) is on our five free-to-air channels.
     
  10. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #10
    We have about 5 free-to-air channels that air all of our network programs (e.g. LOST, Desperate Housewives, CSI, etc.). ...Just for the average American that isn't enough so we spend $50 a month to get networks like The Food Channel, The Discovery Channel, The History Channel, TLC, HGTV, Comedy Central, HBO, etc. etc. etc.
     
  11. generik macrumors 601

    generik

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    Minitrue
    #11
    Not entirely true.. where is my Battlestar Galactica?!
     
  12. Killyp macrumors 68040

    Killyp

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    #12
    Those are BNC conenctors. You are used to coaxial connections. It is highly likely that is your usual RF feed, so all you need is a BNC to RF coax cable. :)
     
  13. TBi macrumors 68030

    TBi

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    Location:
    Ireland
  14. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

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    Location:
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    #14

    Yep, no good free air television here. :(
     
  15. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
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    #15
    You might get more definite answers if you could post higher quality pictures, as it is now it's hard to tell exactly what type of connecters those are.
     
  16. displaced macrumors 65816

    displaced

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Gravesend, United Kingdom
    #16
    They're certainly F-Type connectors.

    They're pretty standard coaxial cable connectors. You'll find them on the backs of satellite and cable TV receivers. My cable service here in the UK terminates on my wall with two of these connectors -- one for the cable TV receiver which I don't use, since I have satellite, and one for the cable modem.

    You'll want one of these adapters.

    Or, if you can find just a F-type plug somewhere, they're really easy to stick onto the end of a length of coax. Just strip the outer casing and fold back & braid the shield wire. Then strip the inner casing almost to the base, and screw on the F-type over the top of the braided shield wire. The core of the coax itself forms the 'pin' of the plug.
     
  17. rjphoto macrumors 6502a

    rjphoto

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    #17
    You said your are "From New Zealand". Does that mean you are "IN" New Zealand?

    The photo is blurry so it makes it hard to diagnose. Try taking another shot a little farther back, use the zoom and flash. Also take a photo of the type of plug on your cable. that may help also.

    I work with AV productions and presentations - ie: VCR & TV/LCD prjector set ups. From the looks of it I would call the wall jack an RF connection. In the US we have 2 types of plugs that work on that. One screws on and the the other slips on. The screw on is used mainly for industrial type set ups where as the slip on is used mainly for consumer set ups.
     
  18. farqueue thread starter macrumors 6502

    farqueue

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    #18
    OK LADS, went down to the local electronic store and they dont even know what i'm talking about
    i searchd my whole apartment - no TV like connectors found - only these


    here are more pictures taken with my iSight on my macbook :)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. farqueue thread starter macrumors 6502

    farqueue

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
  20. Mr. DG macrumors regular

    Mr. DG

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    #20
    Displaced is right - they're f-connectors, usually used to connect satellite dishes to satellite decoder boxes via satellite co-axial cable. The cable is essentially the same as normal tv aerial cable except that it's shielded. it can also carry a small charge so you may get a tiny shock when touching the end of the cable. no big deal though.

    As displaced said, get an adapter and some normal tv aerial cable, plug into the FTA socket and the other end into your tv. My guess is your cable / sat company will pump some fta channels out through that socket. You may need to retune your tv to find anything.
     
  21. kjwebb macrumors regular

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    May 19, 2003
    Location:
    Australia
    #21
  22. redeye be macrumors 65816

    redeye be

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    BXL
    #22
    Just get yourself to your local electronics shop. They'll be able to sell you a convertor.
    I'm also used to the "simply plug in" connectors. These are different yes. I've seen them in person ( :cool: ).

    Edit: it looks like it took me more than 7 minutes to write this short post...
     
  23. displaced macrumors 65816

    displaced

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Gravesend, United Kingdom
    #23
    Hehee... unless you've got your other hand on the earthed casing of your satellite receiver, in which case the tiny shock becomes quite a buzz :D Tasty!

    Yeah, most likely. Although based on the 'FTA' and 'SAT' indicators, and the fact it's in an apartment block, I'd imagine these two connectors are part of the building's distribution network. They'll have one traditional aerial feeding the FTA socket in each apartment via a booster setup.

    The SAT socket is probably wired into a communal satellite dish. I don't know how satellite TV is standardised in NZ, but if it's like the UK, they'll have one dish with a quad LNB (the bit at the end of the arm on the dish) connected to four amplifiers. Each amp boosts one part of the signal (high-band vertical / low-band vertical / high-band horizontal / low-band horizontal), and then the combined feed of all 4 components are sent to each SAT terminal in the block. You'd then get your sat receiver and hook it up, and subscribe to whatever pay-tv sat service is available in NZ -- possibly Sky, the same as the UK.
     
  24. oingoboingo macrumors 6502a

    oingoboingo

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #24
    Don't panic, I don't even know what those connectors are actually called (although everyone else in this thread has named them)...I moved into an apartment in Sydney about 3 years ago and it had them too. I went to the local K-Mart, and they had converters to regular coax for about $5 from memory, just in the electronics section. Just go to Dick Smith / Tandy / K-Mart / BigW / whatever and I'm sure they'll have converters for next to nothing.
     

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