Weighing a Switch to the Mac.

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1

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    Category: Apple Hardware
    Link: Weighing a Switch to the Mac.
    Description:: Any article that suggests Son Vaio graphics are crisper than a Mac is sure to leave you floored.

    Posted on MacBytes.com
    Approved by Mudbug
     
  2. macrumors 6502a

    Passante

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    #2
    That say nothing, I SOOOO scared to switch article was in the NY TIMES? The graphics were clearer........... I see....not :p
     
  3. macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #3
    Okay, so things are different. But I can't help feel that those that call the experience "difficult" are all that adapt at using their windows machine either. I pretty much never touched windows until college, where I became a CS major. I'm pretty sure the only thing that bugs me (but isn't difficult) the double clicking the top bar on a window. Outside of that the only thing that is difficult is finding a preference or control panel (or a half dozen of them) that actually relates to what I want to change.

    If an OS takes you 3 days, maybe a couple hours a day to learn, and you didn't get outside help, I'd say it wasn't "Difficult".
    I know some people still trying to work their Microwave, and let us not forget the VCR :rolleyes:
     
  4. macrumors regular

    montex

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    #4
    I wish the Switchers were not so focused on the fact that the Mac OS is different than Windows. Where did this idea come from that Macs had to be just like winxp in order to be good? I think the greatest thing about the Mac is that things are not only different, but they're done better. So of course there is going to be a slight learning curve. What I'd like to hear is that a windows user discovered that some action they had been doing in Windows was accomplished in OS X in half the time, with fewer mouse clicks and a more intuitive execution. If anything, Switchers are often guilty of overthinking their commands and refusing to let go of their overly complicated Windows paradigm.
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    GorillaPaws

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    #5
    Nice post montex. I thought the article was fairly well done. It was lucid, fairly well rounded and unbiased, unlike many articles I read on the subject. I did dislike how the author's one switcher was a semi-negative experience, perhaps interviewing and quoting several switchers would have been a better tactic.
     
  6. macrumors 68000

    Earendil

    Joined:
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    #6
    Aye. I worked as a photo editor for my college paper for a year. I'm not in jounalism, but everyone else there was, and one of the things they beat into their staff, and the profs beat into the editors, was multiple sources for information, and multiple interviews.
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    #7
    But this is a significant obstacle for end users. I have seen it so many times and even Macs I have given away (or semi-permanently loaned) go unused because people want to get on with their work and not waste time re-learning simple tasks they are used to.

    People who are used to Windows know where things - programmes, favourites, documents - are. It may not be perfectly designed or 'intuitive' but it is an interface that has been learnt. Moving to a Mac often puts them back at the bottom of the learning curve, having to relearn many of the basic operations on their computers and that can be extremely frustrating.

    It may not be something that is nice to see written but it is something worth listening to. I doubt Apple will change to accommodate them by making the interface more usable for people used to Windows (say with a "Switcher Skin", putting Start Menu on the dock, close buttons on the right, fullscreen maximisation and Outlook Express / Internet Explorer icons on the desktop, and a My Documents link for example) but equally I have little doubt that this has also cost them customers where re-learning the basics of computing and helps maintain the mental-barrier than prevents people delving into the dark side.
     
  8. macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #8

    My issue is more with how "difficult" they make it sound. Things are different, but we aren't going from a tractor to an F-15, we are going from a tracor to a truck. Things may look a little different, but you shouldn't be stumped for longer than a few seconds when trying to find something. The functionality needs to be "learned", but it doesn't have to be used if all you need to do is work in a specific app, get your mail, and surf the web. They may not be able to launch an app or find a doc quite as fast as they can under windows (assuming no one told them about spotlight), but what could one possibly be stumped and deadlocked on?

    I know, I know, until you're their you can't imagine the possibilities. and some people are definitally not as technologically inclined, or more probable, lack common sense and deductive reasoning. However as I noted above, I made a move to Windows in a classroom enviroment. I really don't remember ever having problems getting by with basic tasks and finding and using 5 or so programs. If I wanted to find a doc I could use the windows search, only difference was I thought it was broken because it took so long :rolleyes:
    opening programs, navigating the file system, saving files, it was all pretty much the same, and the tiny differences were easy to work out in no time. The only thing I think I had to ask about was "mapping" a network drive.

    Should this issue be noted? yes. Should it be a mark against the operating system as a whole? I'm inclined to say no. Is it a reason not to switch in the long run? I don't think so either. So it should be a warning, but not noted as a reason not to switch. And if you interview someone about whether it was worth it to switch, why note the few days it takes to adjust to something different, when you could be using it for years.
     
  9. macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    I was a die hard windows user until 2 months, now i'm a die hard mac user, but i can still rock windows. I picked up the OS in about a week. It's so easy to use, it's VERY easy to pick up. I just needed a little help with wtf .dmg meant, but after that it's a piece of cake.

    SWITCH, you'll be so glad! and even if you're not for some insane reason that I can't imagine, you can always just run XP on it! (but the thought of that makes me want to hurl)
     
  10. macrumors member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Illinois
    #10
    I know that many of you don't have a lot of sympathy for switchers who don't master the Mac OS in 3 days, but trust me, it doesn't make someone dumb to not "get it" right away.

    I was a Windows user for 14 years until I recently switched (about two months ago). I knew Windows inside and out - could fix just about anything (which is a good trait to have with Windows), and get it all set up. After you spend that much time with an OS, you just know it like the back of your hand.

    I must admit, even though I was extremely excited about switching to Mac, I started having second thoughts the first week I used my iMac. It wasn't that anything was hard, but it was a real pain in the butt to have to look up how to do something (usually on MacRumors Guides) which I knew how to do already in two seconds on Windows.

    However, once I discovered the proper solution under the Mac platform, nine-times-out-of-ten, I was really impressed with the ingenuity (and really depressed with the fact that I couldn't figure out something so simple myself). A good example of this is the first time I tried to install a program. Being used to Windows, I expected a "wizard" to pop up with endless "next" buttons and liscense agreements, etc. However, with the Mac it simply put the little white drive icon (still not quite up on all of my Mac vocabulary) on my desktop and I launched the program out of that location. I couldn't figure out why the program wasn't showing up in my applications, though! When I realized that it was so stupidly easy as simply dragging the icon into the folder to install a program I was really impressed.

    Anyhow, if you give Mac a chance, and are willing to do some digging yourself, you'll thank yourself for it in a short time.

    P.S.: I'm still struggling with one switching issue...In Windows the "end" button on the keyboard will forward your cursor to the end of the current line of text; however, on my Mac it doesn't do that. a) Is there a button which serves the same function on a Mac? and b) What purpose does the "end" key serve on a Mac?
     
  11. macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    #11
    apple-left and apple-right are home and end. Use option-arrows to skip by word. This all makes a little more sense if you look at an ancient Mac keyboard, which simply didn't have all those other keys. There's a nice little lineup here so you can see how that happened.

    The Windows-like keys were added some years ago to make life easier while running Windows emulators and the like. Home and end have since gained some utility with the scroll bar in "real" Mac applications, but mostly they are kind of superfluous.
     
  12. macrumors member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Illinois
    #12
    Ahhh! Thank you! I've missed being able to do that!

    Is there any way that I can program the "home" and "end" buttons on my keyboard to do the same?
     

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