Well It ain't Hubble...but?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by stubeeef, Jun 12, 2005.

  1. stubeeef macrumors 68030

    stubeeef

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    #1
    Link
    I guess that at 130,000 or so feet up the atmosphere becomes fairly stable, but this just does't seem to be stable enough to me. Goes to show how wrong I must be. The article didn't discuss recovery of the telescope though.
     
  2. James Philp macrumors 65816

    James Philp

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2005
    Location:
    Oxford/London
    #2
    Stu, have you been perusing the NASA site or what dude? This is the second thread you've started on this space crap in like 2 minutes! :rolleyes:

    BTW the first man "in space" was said to be this guy who went up in a giant helium ballon and got so high up he could see space and the atmosphere and stuff - apparently a glove seal was loose and his hand froze or summit.
    The craziest thing though was the fact that to get back to earth he sky-dived! It was like 120000 feet or summit!

    EDIT: Found a link to something like the story I was trying to tell:
    http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Lighter_than_air/Balloons_and_Space/LTA17.htm
     
  3. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2002
    Location:
    Yahooville S.C.
    #3
    Hubble is the greatest telescope ever bar none. I'm so glad Griffin is cleaning the house at NASA. They were lost. This is cool but ain't as cool as Hubble. Temple 1 is coming and guess who's going to be taking a nice look. That's right our favorite, Hubble.
     
  4. wwooden macrumors 68000

    wwooden

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Burlington, VT
    #4
    I can't wait until they put a telescope on the dark side of the moon, the images will be amazingly clear and there won't be any interference from earth. That's when we'll really start to see some amazing pictures.
     
  5. jadam macrumors 6502a

    jadam

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    #5

    It wouldn't make much a difference from where hubble is currently located.
     
  6. wwooden macrumors 68000

    wwooden

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Location:
    Burlington, VT
    #6
    Maybe not so much for telescopes, but for other detectors that could potentially have interference from Earth from radio and other forms of waves being on the dark side of the moon will change everything.
     
  7. MacSA macrumors 68000

    MacSA

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Not true.

    The boundary between Earth and space is considered to be at around 60km, the 30km reached by Kittinger is obviousely WAY short of that. And even 60km isnt that far - sub-orbital.
     
  8. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #8
    For the X Prize participants had to exceed 100km (62 miles or 328,000 ft) twice in 14 days.

    So I guess that's the normal definition of space...
     
  9. MacSA macrumors 68000

    MacSA

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    Yes, you're right, I meant to say 60 miles not km.
     

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