What difference does Anti-Aliasing make?

Discussion in 'Mac and PC Games' started by macuser154, Jul 15, 2009.

  1. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #1
    Doesn't it just remove some jagged edges on the screen? I haven't had a computer powerful enough to anti-alias so I don't really know the difference it makes.
     
  2. macrumors G5

    jav6454

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2007
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #2
    Makes rough surfaces or lines look smoother and more natural
     
  3. macrumors 601

    sammich

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Sarcasmville.
    #3
    I don't know what it's like on the more powerful computers but some reviewer said this about Doom 3 and AA: you can either raise the resolution one notch or turn on AA, the difference is negligible, the fps stays about the same.

    Unless you already run at native resolution and you get a good fps already. Turn it on already!
     
  4. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    #4
    You may find this an interesting read. If you want to look at the animated gif, save it to your desktop then right-click and open it with Safari. For some reason just clicking the link did not make it animate.
    http://www.tweakguides.com/Graphics_11.html
     
  5. macrumors Core

    Dagless

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    Darkplace Hospital
    #5
    It's a method of smoothing out the edges of polygons. I only find it useful in low resolutions. On older games that I can run at native res (1680x1050 from a foot or so away) AA makes no visual difference whatsoever.

    Although low res+lots of AA has a natural soft look to it.
     
  6. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    #6
    It makes a lot of difference makes it look better and run better. (only of your computer can handle it.)
     
  7. macrumors 601

    HiRez

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Western US
    #7
    Right, as you increase resolution the "jags" get smaller and smaller, because the pixels are smaller, so aliased lines and edges are less noticeable at high resolutions. Even powerful modern graphics cards can get bogged down with high levels of antialiasing, so be careful. Essentially you are making the computer render every pixel multiple times (2x, 4x, 8x, etc.) when you enable antialiasing. Antialiasing (variations of which are sometimes called multisampling or supersampling) can help, but there is a point where it may not be worth it (for example, I keep it off for World of Warcraft on a 24" screen). Basically just try out the various setting and see how they affect the frame rate, and pick the best balance.
     
  8. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    #8
    Yeah, all it does is smooth the jaggies. It the right circumstances, it's great. I've been playing Final Fantasy VII with ePSXe through boot camp and when the anti-aliasing is turned on the difference in how the characters look is amazing.
     

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