What makes a server a server?

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by 5300cs, Nov 30, 2002.

  1. 5300cs macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #1
    Hello,

    I'm looking at a Mac Workgroup Server 8550/200 on an auction right now, and I was wondering if someone could tell me what makes this machine a server?

    I'm looking for a Mac to connect to my ISDN modem, dial-in then run IP masquerading to share the connection over the network. So far I've been doing it through Debian linux but would like to use a Mac server if possible and do not have NEARLY enough money to get an Xserve.

    Call me stupid, but doesn't a server require extra software/software other than that in workstation installs? Yet this machine I'm looking at says it has OS 8 installed. Is this all I need to run a Mac server?
    (Forgive my ignorance, I've only used Linux/UNIX for servers, and Macs for workstations.)

    Thanks in advance for any help!

    -5300cs
     
  2. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #2
    If you want to share an ISDN modem over a network why don't you just get an ISDN router?
     
  3. 5300cs thread starter macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #3
    ISDN router

    ...because this server is going for about $40 whereas a router would cost a lot more.

    5300cs
     
  4. AssassinOfGates macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    A cardboard box.
    #4
    If its not a g3, don't buy it. Those things are aincent.
     
  5. 5300cs thread starter macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #5
    non G3

    well... my current IP masquerading machine is a p100 running Debian and it has no problems.
    I'm talking about a network with no more than 2 machines sharing the connection at once, sooo... ancient doesn't really bother me.:cool:
     
  6. cr2sh macrumors 68030

    cr2sh

    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    downtown
    #6
    wow, i cant believe i'm saying this....

    then why don't you go buy another p100 for $20 and save yourself the post-hassle and confussion (and $20+shipping)? the 'server' does refer to a liscense, I do not believe there's any difference in the hardware.
     
  7. 5300cs thread starter macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #7
    oh...

    Well, if there's no difference then I might as well.
    I thought there would be some sort of OS difference; I was looking for something point & click for my wife to use.

    5300cs
     
  8. springscansing macrumors 6502a

    springscansing

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    #8
    What's the damn difference? For his use, its fine.
     
  9. alex_ant macrumors 68020

    alex_ant

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2002
    Location:
    All up in your bidness
    #9
    You don't need a G3 for an ISDN router. You don't even need a PPC. The 8550 is much more machine than you would need for such a task if that's all you'll be using it for.

    I'm sure there must be some kind of routing software available for the classic Mac OS (version 8). I know that routing (or even using more than one network interface at a time) is not a built-in facility of the OS, so you'll likely have to pay for some shareware to do this. (Or else install Linux or whatever onto the machine and wrap up the functions you need it to do into easy-to-use, carefree shell scripts with names like "startisdn" and "stopisdn" - but then, why bother replacing your P100). Apple servers before OS X ran ordinary Mac OS with some network applications added, I believe (although I'm not sure).

    You mentioned that a dedicated ISDN router would be more expensive, but if you look at long-term cost, you might pay more over time for the 8550 because it uses so much more electricity.
     
  10. buffsldr macrumors 6502a

    buffsldr

    Joined:
    May 7, 2001
    #10
    why dont you hook your isdn modem to a blind hub. the hub will have at least 4 ports. one port will be for your "uplink" (that is where you will put the modem out cable"), the other ports can be used for your other two computers. this does not provide the same network security, but what do you care?
     

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