What should I do to make sure nothing’s wrong with my iMac?

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by dferigmu, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. dferigmu macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #1
    I think I have again decided to buy an iMac since I don’t want to wait until next Spring/Summer to get a new computer.

    My question is: what can I do to make sure nothing is wrong with it? Someone suggested a hardware test. How do I do that and is there anything else I should do?

    Also, if there is something wrong, how long will it be until the problem emerges? Right away, after leaving it on all day, or after a couple weeks?

    Finally, if it does have a problem, can I just take it into the Apple Store 15 minutes away? Will they fix it for free?
     
  2. Palad1 macrumors 6502a

    Palad1

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    Location:
    London, UK
    #2
    Well, here's what I did with my pb 1.5GHz when I got it and after I manually added 512 Megs of ram:
    1. Install the developper tools
    2. Install fink : http://fink.sourceforge.net
    3. Open up the terminal
    4. sudo fink install kdebase3

    Check back 24 hours later, if the build process threw an error,the machine has a defect.
     
  3. St Soichiro macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    #3
    Could you clarify your post a little bit:
    Are you talking about problems that could occur with a new iMac that you are planning to buy?

    If yes - then there is no need to really presume that there would be something wrong with it. In case the iMac does have a problem it could appear at any time. Electronic components do not fail in the same manner as mechanical ones, i.e. over a period of use. Of-course your hard-drive will wear out and fail over a period of time. Make sure that you maintain external back-ups.

    If something does go wrong and you have Applecare (free for 1st year, can be purchased for additional) then Apple will fix it for free, provided it was not due to your misuse. It could be at the Apple store or by mailing it to Apple. My own personal experience has been very good. I had to send in a PowerBook to get a power inverter replaced and had a turn around time of 4 business days (from mailing out to receiving).

    - St. S
     
  4. varmit macrumors 68000

    varmit

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    #4
    If you get Applecare, it will be fixed for free for up to 3 years. Otherwise its one year with the standard warrenty. I would just turn it on and run it constantly, and see if anything fails. The first few days my parents had their new iMac I was constantly on it. Surfing the web, playing games, ripping DVDs. Other than it seems the cpu fan has gotten broken in and hums just a little louder, everything else seems fine an dandy. Usually problems pop their head right away after a couple hours worth of use. But sometimes they take over a year to manifest them selfs. I suggest getting the 3 year Applecare, and sleep easy at night that you can get it repaired.
     
  5. dferigmu thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Oct 3, 2004
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #5
     
  6. dferigmu thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
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    Washington, DC
    #6
    Ok, now what does each of those mean? What are the developer tools and where do I get them? What's fink and openning up the terminal?
     
  7. Palad1 macrumors 6502a

    Palad1

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    Location:
    London, UK
    #7
    Developper tools comes bundled with OSX on the install DVD. Fink is an application that downloads, compiles and installs most unix applications on your computer, and in order to open up the terminal, just go to applications/utilities/terminal.

    You'll need an active internet connection in order to do that.

    This tests will compile about ~200 programs from scratch, which uses quite a lot of memory.

    So with this you'll be testing your memory, cpu and hard drive for failures. Think of it as a standard unix system stress-test.

    I don't know any other ways to test a system, but I'm new to OSX so I'd be glad to be proven wrong :)

    Cheers,
    Palad1

    ps: I'm sorry for talking too nerdy to you in my first post :)
     
  8. rueyeet macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #8
    Chances are that if you aren't already familiar with fink and the terminal, the hardware tests Palad1 is talking about will be more information than you'll really need.

    St Soichiro is right--there's really no way to be absolutely 100% sure that your new Mac won't have any problems, or when such a problem would show up if it did. But in all likelihood, it won't. If you're sufficiently worried about the possibility, get AppleCare. Regular backups are a good idea whether or not you anticipate hard drive failure....there's always accidents and the like (and no, I wouldn't *expect* a hard drive to fail within three years under normal use, either, but you never know).

    Really, I wouldn't worry about it overly much.
     
  9. dferigmu thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #9


    Thanks! :)
     
  10. St Soichiro macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    #10
    With regards to hard-drive failure:
    Over a period of 3 years you will probably not get an HD failure. But it cannot be guaranteed. I am most paranoid about data loss :D. Computers can be replaced (I go through a computer every year), but data loss can be expensive. For me this is mostly work related and I tend to store everything on my PB. So I tend to back-up multiple copies. Sensors can be used to predict impending HD failure, but can be unreliable.

    Hardware test:
    I could be wrong on this, but how about using the Hardware Test CD that comes with your new Mac.


    - St. S
     

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