What would be considered a lot of page outs?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by furious, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. furious macrumors 65816

    furious

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Location:
    Australia
    #1
    i get about page outs 85000 in 10 hours and about the same page ins

    and people who say the Macbook is unusable without 2gb of ram well i have been using mine for 1 month no problem. just would like to know what people think is a lot of page outs. i use word, powerpoint, excel, mail, safari, and itunes.

    MacBook 1.83ghz 512mb ram
     
  2. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #2
    My PowerBook has 768 MB as you can see from the screen shot of Activity Monitor. It isn't particularly taxed at the moment so it's looking pretty relaxed.

    I've had it down to a few MB free and the page outs were much closer to the page ins and that wasn't good at all.

    The number of page outs should really not approach the number of page ins except on a very busy system.

    In your case, only having 512 MB isn't nearly enough but having a 5400 rpm disk drive helps speed access to virtual memory. I felt that 512 MB was a nice number for Mac OS X v10.3 and with Dashboard running in 10.4, anything between 512 MB and 768 MB should be the minimum.

    I suspect that the numbers on Intel machines look bad compared to the PowerPC machines and will until Leopard but I have no long term experience.
     
  3. xPismo macrumors 6502a

    xPismo

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Location:
    California.
    #3
    1.25gb Ram. Powerbook G4.... currently 288259/203669

    I always have tons of pageouts. Lots of apps running at the same time... plus the colbert report (VLC)... if this helps.
     
  4. furious thread starter macrumors 65816

    furious

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    Aug 7, 2006
    Location:
    Australia
    #4
    this is todays page in/outs :eek:
     

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  5. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #5
    That's not terrible considering the RAM you have but it looks as though you're just getting started.
     
  6. SmurfBoxMasta macrumors 65816

    SmurfBoxMasta

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    #6
    ANY pageouts are too many. It means that you are running out of real memory, and the system is hitting your HD for swap space.

    not only does this slow everything down, it just adds to the wear & tear on your HD.......

    Yes, your machine will continue to work in this condition, but IMO you'd be pleasantly surprised at the performance improvements gained if you added another 512/1GB of ram.......
     
  7. Star Destroyer macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    #7
    soo thats what page outs are..
    I have always hear page out page in talk, and never new anything more then "page outs are bad" I run my Macbook with 1Gb and never had a page out yet... Not a single one, i dont do much on it other then internet, some office work and Adium, garageband every couple days.. Never a probelm, so 1Gb is great!
     
  8. cartoonfox macrumors regular

    cartoonfox

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Location:
    London
    #8
    Hmm, what is the meaning of in and out?
    I have 26204 ins, but 0 outs. Good? Bad? Normal for 512mb?


    Peace
     
  9. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #9
    A pageout means that a segment of real memory that wasn't actively being used was written to the virtual memory file on the disk drive, because the chunk of memory was needed for something else. It's sort of like...erm... if you have two hands and you have an iPod, a phone, a camera, and a PDA. You can hold one or two of them but if you want another one, you're out of hands, and you have to put one that you're holding now back in your backpack to make room in your hands for the other one. Something loosely like that. ;) If you had enough hands you could hold them all and would never need to go to your backpack. :D

    As long as you don't have outs, ins, which are bringing a chunk of information into memory, are just fine.
     
  10. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #10
    It sounds as if you just turned on the machine.

    If you haven't had any page outs, nothing has exceeded available RAM and nothing in active RAM has been paged out to the swap file.
     
  11. cartoonfox macrumors regular

    cartoonfox

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Location:
    London
    #11
    Damn, you're right, it's been on for 50 mins and now I have 420 outs : [

    So, how much is RAM these days? : ]
     
  12. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #12
    From my viewpoint, RAM is pretty inexpensive. Then again, I once paid over $1000 for 32 MB of RAM in one stick.

    Before anyone else says anything, the U.K. always has the worst prices. ;)

    There are a few threads on RAM prices. You might do a search through the Buying Tips forum for more information.
     
  13. spicyapple macrumors 68000

    spicyapple

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    #13
    I got over 4,000 page-outs in the last week since a reboot. This after running several big programs including Final Cut Studio and Photoshop CS2.

    Picture 1.png
     
  14. cartoonfox macrumors regular

    cartoonfox

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Location:
    London
    #14
    ****, it's been like, what, an hour since my last post?
    And look how many pages out I have now!

    : [

    I definatley need more RAM. Gonna search through the buying forum,
    cheers.
     

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  15. VoodooDaddy macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    #15
    This is after almost 11 days of uptime. Yes, I know I need more ram. My mini still works fine, but when the system gets taxed like this it starts to run slow.
     

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