Whats Best: Nikon D50 or Canon EOS-D350

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kardashian, Oct 24, 2006.

  1. Kardashian macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #1
    I'm looking to pick up a DSLR within the next week or so, I can't really stretch over £450.

    The best I've seen, for the price, are the Nikon D50, and Canon EOSD350.

    Whats your opinions? Ease of use? Value for money?

    D50 is just under £400, and D350 is just under £430.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. annk Administrator

    annk

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    #2
    This sort of question has been asked so many times, that I think I can answer it, even though I'm no expert.

    In the long run, it depends which company's lenses you want to go with. Think about your needs, what sort of photography you want to do, and look at the lens line-up for Canon and Nikon. The glass is more important than the body.

    You can also go into a store and take a look at both bodies. See how they feel in your hands. If you don't have much to compare it to, I don't think you'll be able to form an opinion about how the controls sit and function, but you can at least get an idea of how it will be to hold and use the body.

    But at the end of the day, I would guess you'll be pleased with either. :) They're both entry-level dSLRs, designed for the same consumer group.
     
  3. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #3
    I felt more comfortable with the Canon, its layout and menu system - and I was really happy with the photographs it took, as well.

    I'm 99% sure I want the EOS, unless someone on here has something that warns me off it [lets hope not!]

    Thanks!
     
  4. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    As you probably know the 350D has been superceded by the 400D. If you want to go with Canon I'd plump for the newer model. The price difference isn't that great for a lot more features.

    IMO I'd go with the Nikon though, as it's a great camera for less cash (currently under £375 with lens). If you can wait a couple of weeks it's likely the D50 is going to be replaced soon, possibly by the D60.

    It's best to spend any extra money you have on better lenses than more expensive DSLR bodies. Also the standard Canon kit lens isn't too good and Nikon trumps it in this regard having a nice 18-55mm kit lens with the D50.

    Top tip: find the cheapest price in the UK on the Net, then take it to Jessops who do a 110% price match. If you have any problems it's a lot easier to go back to a Jessops shop. They also do 28 day no quibble returns.

    Check http://www.camerapricebuster.co.uk for the best prices.
     
  5. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #5
    To be honest, I've used a friends Canon, and I do preffer it overall - but if the D50 is better, I guess I'll go with that.

    The lens didn't bother me so much, as I was going to get one for Christmas. Its my first DSLR, so I'm not going to be producing masterpieces, mainly fashion portraits of people, to edit in Photoshop.

    Would the Canon not suffice these needs?

    [Sorry, its just I really like how it feels to hold, and the layout of everything, over the D50]

    As for that Jessops idea, thats brilliant! We have a Jessops store in town, so I'll find the cheapest prices as you say, then go in and enquire about the price-match guarantee. :)

    Its way out of my price range. £450 is the max.


    The Canon is 18-55mm, also (according to Amazon)
     
  6. Zeke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    #6
    It wasn't the range that is better, but the optical quality of the Nikon 18-55. In any case, go with the one you like. All the lenses are basically the same for lots of money later. The 350d is a great camera. You won't be sorry.
     
  7. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Shame. If cash is tight it's another vote for the D50 then.

    Yes I know, the difference is that it's (relatively) crap. It'll still be better than what you're used to if you're coming from a point-and-shoot camera though.

    I'd wait and see what Nikon brings out early next month.
     
  8. extraextra macrumors 68000

    extraextra

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2006
    Location:
    California
    #8
    Cash is tight - D50 + kit lens, and maybe you can throw in a 50mm f/1.8 (about $100).
     
  9. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #9
    Go with the one that feels the best. The difference between the two is incremental, not worth worrying over- especially if you already have a clear preference.

    Spend the least you can on a body and the most you can on lenses.
     
  10. peterparker macrumors regular

    peterparker

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Location:
    Houston
    #10
    Ditto
     
  11. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #11
    There is more to a lens than just its range of focal lenths. For example
    1) How does it render out of focuas background objects. It s soft or harsh.
    2) Does it add color to hightlioghts?
    3) does the filter ring rotate when the lens focuses?
    4) It there an instant manual focus over ride?
    5) Is there any noticable pin cushion or barrel distortion in the wide or tele settings
    6) how fast does it focus and does the motor make much noise
    7) Overall build quality
    8) does the lens even have a usable manual focus ring?
    9) how close doe the lens focus
    10-) what is the maximum aperture -- this is the #2 most importent featue
    11) And most importantly - Is the lens "sharp"? How does it resolve details in the center and at the edges?

    You need to ask these questions about all of the Canon and Nikon lenses you might own over the life of the system. After all if you buy the Canon EOS system every lens you buy later, for years or decades will be Canon EOS lenses. Seems ood to make such a long lasting decision based on button placement on one camera body. That said both campanies make good stuff. But different stuff.

    Ok hard to think decades ahead. What will be your next lens? If you want the Nikon 85mm f/1.8 lens then you need the Nikon body. Same if you really like one of the Canon lenses. Think at least two lenses ahead and maybe a body upgrade ahead too. Going either way is reasonable but deciding based on a triveal difference is not.
     
  12. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #12
    OK - I'm more confused now than when I started out.

    I am a total noob to SLR photography, incase that wasn't obvious, and I intend to learn what all your points mean, along the way - at the moment I'm at a loss as I haven't had experience with anything other than Point and Shoots.

    All I want to know is, whats the best set up:

    1. D50 and included lense - then another lense (up to around £150) at Xmas.
    2. D350 and included lense - then another lense (up to around £150) at Xmas.
    3. D50 body only and a seperate, 'custom' lense now (total can't reach more than £470) - and another lense at Xmas.
    4. D350 body only and a seperate, 'custom' lense now (total can't reach more than £470) - and another lense at Xmas.

    90% of pictures are going to be ''modelling'' shots for my art project - so people, mainly. I want a camera that will function well in low lighting - as some of the pictures I intend to take are at night on a beach.

    Most shots will be taken close to the model, others will be at a distance to include some surrounding landscape.

    Overall, for my budget whats best - one of the D50 or D350 kits, with the included lense and upgrading to a 2nd one later - or - buying a body only, and choosing a decent ''all rounder'' lense now. :confused:


    I'm a complete noob into this sort of Photography - but I intend to become experienced. Its obvious the difference in quality when using an SLR - I'm just tired of the crappy pictures and slowness associated with P&S's.
     
  13. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #13
    Lets pretend that the lenses offered by both companies is of equal quality (although the lineup isn't the same).

    If the lenses were equal and I was picking a camera, I'd pick the Nikon D50.

    And like drlunanerd said, the D50 may be upgraded very soon.



    For low light, a 50 mm f/1.8 or f/1.4, although you could only afford the 50 mm f/1.8. If you want to take photos at a distance in order to get the surrounding landscape, a zoom lens isn't going to help you do that. :confused:

    The 50 mm f/1.8 will do this, and under low light. If you're really concerned about shooting in low light, I'd get the 50 mm f/1.4, but that's just me.
     
  14. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #14
    Thanks very much.

    So would the included D50 lense be good enough for shooting in normal lighting conditions, and have a zoom, like a normal P&S - only better focused and better quality?

    Then, for the night time shots I need a '50 mm f/1.8' lense?

    B.T.W: What does 50 mm f/1.8 mean? :eek:

    Thanks in advance :)
     
  15. annk Administrator

    annk

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    #15
    1) I'm pretty sure that the quality of images taken in low lighting depend on the lens, not the camera body. A lens with at least 2.8, I would imagine.

    2) Since you don't have a lot of experience, it's hard to know what you might eventually want. IMO it's practically impossible to know what sorts of lenses you want until you've actually spent some time shooting and evaluating your results. So I would suggest you get the Canon S3 IS. It's a high-end P and S, I think you will be surprised at the results you get. You have quite a bit of manual control with that camera. It's well within your budget, and will no doubt have a decent resale value when you do make the jump to a dSLR.

    I started with the S2 IS, and am really glad I did. It took me quite a while before I felt I had a handle on everything I could do with it, and I felt it made my choice of dSLR a more intelligent one.
     
  16. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #16
    With respect, I disagree with this advice. I think it's a waste of time and money to buy a bridge camera like an S3. The OP is ready to buy a DSLR as he's already been using a P&S, and it makes more financial sense too.

    Bottom line: buy either the D50 or 350D with their cheapest kit lenses. My advice would be to go for the D50. Then get a 50mm lens for portraits in low light if you find you need it, and you're set.

    Other advice: wait until early November to see if Nikon replaces the D50.
     
  17. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #17
    Thanks very much. I'm going to wait another fortnight, see if anything gets released, if not, I'll get the D50 or 350D based on how confident I feel holding them and using them - as the lenses are pretty much the same.

    If I get a 50mm f/1.8 or 1.4 lense that will enable me to take portrait pictures in lowlight, or at night, correct? :)

    Thanks for all your help, Drlunanerd.
     
  18. annk Administrator

    annk

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    #18
    I know, in a way I agree, but the OP seems to have very, very little experience, based on the questions he's asking. It doesn't seem he has any basis on which to know what his future needs and wishes will be.

    I just meant to convey that my own experience with going over from a basic P and S to a dSLR was made much more intelligent by having a bridge camera. I learned a lot more about the sorts of images I was interested in taking, and what sort of functions were important to me. It gave me enough experience to go into a camera store and ask intelligent questions, which in turn gave me even more info.

    And I don't think going with the Canon kit lens is good. People claim the Nikon kit lens is of better quality, so that in itself might be a reason to go with the Nikon. But I would strongly suggest the Canon 50 mm 1.8 II as a reasonably-priced replacement for the kit 18-55mm.

    But I do agree that regardless of whether the OP goes with the entry-level Canon or Nikon, he'll most likely be happy. :)
     
  19. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #19
    Thanks a lot, AnnK, for showing a lot of interest - and I do appreciate your help.

    True, I know hardly anything about DSLR's - but I do a lot of photography and editing for Art - its what my art is based around. I may not know the basics of a good DSLR, but I understand and know what direction I'm going in with my photography, I just don't know what the best-suited equipment for me is :p .

    I suppose like everything else, I'll learn along the way - I pick things up pretty easy ''hands on'' - so we'll see how it goes. Even if I don't get straight into understanding lenses etc, one things for sure - I'll be producing better pictures right out the box, moving up from a 5MP P&S - and a lot quicker.

    People here will probably laugh at me, your all so experienced.. but if the Nikon/Canon comes with a 18-55mm lense, why do I need do buy a 50mm one for night shots? [Sorry in advance for being stupid!]
     
  20. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #20
    I understand what you're saying. I think it's best to keep things as simple as possible in terms of advice, whilst not doing him a disservice in the long run, so I think it's better just to recommend a DSLR in his price range. Like you say, any of the entry level DSLRs, especially from Nikon and Canon, will give great results, even with the basic kit lenses in good light. Then the cheap 50mm lenses are perfect for the portraits he wants to do, but with the kit zoom lenses he'll have had chance to play around and gauge the results you can get. He might find that's all he needs, especially if he doesn't mind using flash.
     
  21. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #21
    Basically the 50mm lenses let more light into the camera (that's what the f/1.8 means - the smaller the number the more light it can gather). This means you can get a sharp photo in less light. However if it's literally at night, you'll still need flash or other lighting on your subject, so you might not need a 50mm. Best just to get the basic kit lens and try it out in the conditions you find yourself in.

    PS everyone's talking about the 50mm lenses as they're relatively cheap. Normally to get a "fast" lens you have to spend hundreds of pounds.
     
  22. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #22
    Thanks for clearing that up - we're getting there, slowly!:)
     
  23. annk Administrator

    annk

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    #23
    True. :)

    Your questions aren't stupid, I was asking a lot of them myself not long ago, and I still have a looong way to go in understanding. That was my point, I guess, that having that bridge camera helped me to know more about what sort of equipment was best suited for me. But I do think that drlunanerd's points are all valid and make good sense.

    As to your question about the focal length (XXmm) - the 50mm 1.8 II I mentioned lets in more light, and is therefore better for work in low light. the 1.8 number is what's called an f stop.
     
  24. Kardashian thread starter macrumors 68020

    Kardashian

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Location:
    Britain.
    #24
    Thanks for the Wiki - very informative.

    Gonna scoot around on there now, read up on all the different terms etc. [Couldn't find geeky glasses - so i'll go with these] =:cool:
     
  25. dogbone macrumors 68020

    dogbone

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Location:
    S33.687308617200465 E150.31341791152954
    #25
    That's interesting because I always thought that the clunky menu system was one of the annoying things about the canon. Instead of hotkeys on the camera taking you directly to the control, they take you to a menu.
     

Share This Page