What's stopping anyone?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Xander562, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. Xander562 macrumors 68000

    Xander562

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    #1
    Hey, I recently recieved this month's issue of Maximum PC (Yes, i know, no need to comment on it). Anyway, this month's main article was about building the ultimate home theatre PC. I thought, "Wow, this should be interesting" then i thought, "Ooh wait, its going to be windows.....:("
    So my questioin is this, shouldn't it be possible to put OSX on a custom machine that I built? Is it possible? If not, what makes the hardware apple puts out, soo much different from everything else? What exactly is stopping us from building our own custom machines, and buying a copy of OSX to put on it?
     
  2. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #2
    First of all, it is illegal; therefore, we are not allowed to discuss this topic on these forums.

    It is possible, but very difficult. Apple has done a good job of making sure it's not easy.
     
  3. Xander562 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    Apr 2, 2006
    #3
    really? is it ok to ask why?
    or what makes it impossibe? not how to do it.
     
  4. CoMpX macrumors 65816

    CoMpX

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    #4
    Because Apple said you can only run Mac OS on an Apple Macintosh computer.
     
  5. generik macrumors 601

    generik

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    #5
    DMCA pwns j00 free speech!
     
  6. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #6
    Ya, it's a violation of the EULA and the DMCA.
     
  7. stapler macrumors member

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    Sep 3, 2006
    #7
    It might have been confusing initially but now the monotony and frustration has been pretty well-documented and organized into step-by-step manuals. Of course, it's still illegal, unsupported, and still awkward to install.

    In the end you end up with an underperforming PC with no graphics accelleration, no official software updates, and slews of hardware problems that often stop you from even getting anything working in the first place without investing in new hardware.

    Overall, not really worth it outside of some kind of a "it's mac on a PC lol" trick.
     
  8. Xander562 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    Apr 2, 2006
  9. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #9
    Also, IIRC Apple has a special chip on the motherboard and without it, OS X will not start (to put it simply).
     
  10. Xander562 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    Apr 2, 2006
    #10
    wow, oh well, i guess that's the answer i'm looking for.....
     
  11. stapler macrumors member

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    Sep 3, 2006
    #11
    I mean, go for it, but prepare yourself for a sub-par Mac OS X experience after going through the torture of installing it.

    Oh, and if you have to dual-boot, prepare for more hell.
     
  12. Xander562 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    #12
    haha, i'd rather deal with windows :eek: haha
     
  13. weg macrumors 6502a

    weg

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    nj
    #13
    Then the problem is that Apple's computers are not costomizable enough.. unless you buy a prosumer model, the only way to "max out" your Mac is BTO :(
     
  14. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    Cascadia
    #14
    Three big reasons:

    1. Apple's EULA (that license you have to agree to before installing/running any piece of software,) specifically says that OS X may only be run on an 'Apple labeled' computer. The exact quote is from section 2 part a: (emphasis mine) "This License allows you to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple software on a single Apple-labeled computer, or to enable others to do so."

    That means that installing OS X onto a non-Apple-labeled machine is in violation of the license agreement.

    2. All Apple Intel machines use what is called a 'Trust Platform Module' chip (TPM) that the Mac OS uses to confirm that it is indeed running on an Apple system.

    While it is theoretically possible to circumvent this, doing so violates the DMCA. (And no, I'm not going to tell you where you could find more about 'theoretically' how to do this.)

    3. As all Apple Intel machines come with OS 10.4 Tiger on them, and on their restore discs, there is no reason to sell an Intel-compatible version of Tiger in stores. Therefore, the copies of OS X you can buy in the store only contain the PowerPC code, and cannot run on ANY Intel machine, not even Apple's own.

    This means that the only way to acquire an Intel-compatible version of OS X is to either illegally download (a.k.a. "pirate") it, or get it with an Apple Intel machine, and illegally (against the DMCA AND license agreement,) modify it and install it on a second machine.


    From a theoretical legal standpoint on the license, it MAY be legal to buy a new Apple Intel machine, REMOVE OS X from that machine (run Linux, for example,) stick an Apple sticker on a 'generic PC' (After all, the license does not define 'Apple-labeled'...) and run your one legal license of OS X on that generic PC. But you'd still have to violate the DMCA to get around the TPM protection.
     
  15. miniConvert macrumors 68040

    miniConvert

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    Kent, UK - the 'Garden of England'.
    #15
    It all boils down to Apple being a hardware company. You want their software? You buy their hardware.

    Unfortunately Apple's product lineup feels about 5 years out of date. They haven't ventured far from that grid Steve used to show to illustrate the desktops and portables for consumer and pro. There's room for at least 3 more machines in the Mac lineup IMHO, a media centre, an ultraportable and a headless mid-range.
     
  16. Zwhaler macrumors 603

    Zwhaler

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    Jun 10, 2006
    #16
    I would like to see someone try that... only knowing that it will never work as well as it would on a mac.
     
  17. suneohair macrumors 68020

    suneohair

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    Aug 27, 2006
    #17
    Yes, five years out of date in comparison to what? It must be those new Intel processors.. :rolleyes:

    Apple will add these machines when they feel they should, and if they feel they should.

    if you dont like it, buy from someone else.
     
  18. Xander562 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Xander562

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    Apr 2, 2006
    #18
    You make some good points,
    I wish they would make a media centre.
     
  19. macenforcer macrumors 65816

    macenforcer

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    Jun 9, 2004
    Location:
    Colorado
    #19
    My home is filled with computers. Have 2 macs and 6 PCs and I can tell you from experience, OS X and macs are HORRIBLE for home theatre. What worked out great in the end was a main computer with Windows Media Center on it and a dual tv tuner card installed. Then I have Xbox 360s hooked up to TVs that I want to watch recorded TV. ITs the BOMB. Works flawlessly. Eyetv on a mac mini on your tv just sucks as that was my old setup. The Windows MCE pc NEVER crashes and NEVER misses a show. I got 1tb of tv storage and can increase that to 2tb if I wish. I love it. Want to burn that show to a DVD no problem. Drop a blank DVD in the pc and hit burn. ITs great.

    Apple really needs to get off the front row kick and do something as nice as MCE. So far nothing comes close.
     

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