When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by zimv20, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #1
    information week

    this is something i've mentioned at least twice before, and i thought IW did a decent job reporting it. the article goes on about why the telecoms aren't building these networks (even though we paid for them through taxation).

    what we need is the gov't to do what japan's and korea's are doing -- and that's treating broadband access a public utility. the gov't should build the lines -- everywhere -- and let private companies pay for access and compete for service and price.

    it makes no sense for AT&T and verizon to build their own lines, to only a portion of the US, and be able to operate them as a monopoly.
     
  2. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    #2
    I've read several articles like this over the years. I moved to the US from Japan in 2004 expecting more or less the same broadband offerings. The situation is shockingly bad in the US. Thanks to a free offer in the area, I recently got a 10/1 cable line which is still not what I had 3 years ago in Japan on the cheapest package (it was 12/1 or something around there). Still, it helps because I do a lot of web design and I need the up stream speeds.

    Japan, following Korea, built/ is building an optical backbone that supports the 100/100 lines mentioned in the article. In my area in Tokyo, all new apartments and houses were built with the high speed line installed. My landlord actually had all her buildings wired as well - high speed internet became part of the rent. Here in my first house I had to pay something like $50 just to have the line installed and then monthly bills are around $50 for internet alone. IMHO that is way too much $$ for way too little...

    At any rate, the number of times I've read articles like this and still notihing is being done, I wonder if anything will ever be done. I'd say give the US 20 years.
     
  3. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #3
    Yep, privatization and bushco's willingness to roll over whenever the telcos start whinging about regulation means that the US will remain in last place for a long time to come. It's ironic that the US is such an innovator in so many fields that would truly benefit from high speed broadband yet so few Americans are able to take advantage of it.
     
  4. Kalns macrumors regular

    Kalns

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    #4
    I'd love to have a faster internet....but I don't know what I'd do with it lol. I guess my Xbox live would be more lag free or something. :D
     
  5. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #5
    the issue is more extensive than that. here is one example:
     
  6. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #6
    How much bandwidth can a provider physically provide in the US. Is there a cap at the moment or is it just lack to open the pipe.
     
  7. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #7
    there's no gov't imposed cap, if that's what you mean. now, providers build their own networks in a profit-minded sort of way. so the infrastructure is underwhelming and prices are high.

    a small percentage of US customers get 1 mpbs performace. most (all?) japanese and korean citizens get 100 mpbs, for less money. our networks are that bad.

    and don't forget that we, the US taxpayers, have already paid to have those networks built. but the telecoms spent it on other stuff, including profits. i'm still waiting for congress to hold the telecoms to task.
     
  8. Motley macrumors 6502

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    #8
    You're not thinking creatively enough. Look at the xBox market place, they rent hi-def movies. Imagine the bandwidth to stream the movies in an on demand situation. Imagine being able to stream any show you wanted.

    If the tech is there the uses will follow.
     
  9. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #9
    even further:

    imagine a household w/ 2 parents and 2 teenage kids. the parents are watching an on-demand movie. the daughter is in her room watching cable while talking on the phone, her own VoIP line. the son is in his room, playing on on-line FPS game, while his friend uses a laptop to upload to youtube.

    this is the (near) future of connectivity. how much bandwidth must that household support to do all that? then consider their neighbors are doing the same thing, and just about every other house in the suburb.

    can an overloaded, neighborhood-shared 10 mpbs cable pipeline support that? hardly.
     
  10. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

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    #10
    I'll be happy when FiOS is available in my area in a week or two...for a while. But seriously, I know several people who don't even have access to DSL and they are within 40 miles of my house. And if you look at it this way, it'll be $50 per month for the 15Mbps down/ 2Mbps up line that I'll be getting, that speed is over 6 times slower than what Japan has available for less than that, and I only one of the lucky 1% of the United States. Do any of the US ISPs even have plans for even faster internet than FiOS?
     
  11. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #11
    even if they do, as you've pointed out, what's likely to be the distribution of such lines if there are large chunks of the US that can't get DSL?

    and DSL doesn't even require new lines to each home!
     
  12. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #12
    Too bad you obviously haven't discovered pr0n.

    A lot of it's money. And the pipes. There's some pretty old wiring out there, and even some of the new stuff isn't that great. But there are some places, like Santa Clara/San Jose that are rolling out 16MBboss the street it's not available. My Dad just last year was able to get high speed in his suburban town. I've been offered 10Mb by Timewarner for about $50 with cable TV, but I'm paying about $40 for what they say is a 5Mb connection that's really barely 3. Best I could get with the high one in real world is about 7-8, though I doubt it would even be that good. Still I'm considering it, because I do a lot of web work, and streaming media.

    I look at other countries getting much more for much less, and I'm jealous and wondering why they aren't doing more here. But it would cost too much and cut into their profits. Yet still they continue to jack up the price. Not that I'm bitter or anything.
     
  13. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #13
    you have to remember the US is a lot larger in just physical land mass and has a lot more land per capita than most of the world. That along with major population centers are very spread out on there location. Because of just the land mass the back bone of the systems cost a lot more to build and maintain. They require more repeater stations, more cable to be laid and that also all cost more to maintain and keep up and running.

    European, Japan and other countries like that have it very easy compared to the US. They have very little land they have to cover so the back bone cost less to build and maintain so in that respect the US does need to be cut some slack. It cost more in the US to build up and maintain those systems.
     
  14. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #14
    the telecoms already took the federal money to do the work, then didn't do the work. are you excusing the telecoms?
     
  15. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

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  16. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #16
    People seem to be willing to overlook that and come up with any number of excuses.
     
  17. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #17
    oh don't get me wrong I think the US is lagging way to far behind and the money is one thing but it depends on how much they got to do it and you still have the other issue is it takes time to lay the cable and everything. As far as I understand most of the system has to be redone to get up to fiber optical and what not and that takes years to do.

    Depends on how fast they are moving to get it done. First thing they have to do is get the backbone system laid out and then spread out from there.

    It does go both way in over looking. People over look the US is at a disadvantages in moving in any direction that has to cover a lot of space and they need to be cut some slack.

    The US companies get less money per mile of cable as they would in other countries in the world.
     
  18. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    No, but it does require the installation of booster stations in locations distant from the SO. But the fact that they aren't installing enough of these boosters is remarkable, considering how hard the telecoms are pushing DSL in the areas where they can already provide the service. I recently switched from DSL to cable. I got a call this week from Verizon trying to sell me DSL. I told them I just went with cable, and the salesperson asked me why. When I told him it was much faster, he quickly said "thank you, have a nice day," and hung up. I didn't even have an opportunity to tell him that if Verizon offered FiOS in my area, that the story might be different! My guess is they already know, but don't care.
     
  19. zflauaus macrumors 65816

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    #19
    Honestly, I don't give a damn about the U.S. not having 100mb connection to the internet. I give a damn in that the U.S. still has no broadband plan for rural customers, like me. I think before we start getting even 25mb as the standard, telcos and others need to come up with an affordable solution for rural areas to get even 768k connections. Most people can't afford satellite connections and don't want to pay for IDSL or ISDN. Our area has a wireless internet provider but the only way we could get it is if built at 75 foot tower at least. Not going to happen.

    Our power company ran an article in their newsletter about 5 months ago concerning BPL and surveying it, but they haven't done anything yet or at least mentioned anything like this. I honestly think BPL is going to be the thing that will finally give rural customers broadband. I don't know when, but it's probably going to be the only thing.
     
  20. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #20
    If cities were getting 100 Mbps connections the rural areas would see their options grow quickly, especially as the scaling factors of laying that much fibre trunk came into play. Also, cable companies and telecoms would no longer be able to charge rural customers $50/mo for a substandard connection with a straight face.
     
  21. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

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    #21
    Sorry, but this made me laugh.
     
  22. Mac-Addict macrumors 65816

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    #22
    England sucks, the fastest internet connection I can get in my area is 5mb and to me thats fast compared to the 1mb connection I used to have.
     
  23. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #23
    Nice catch! I suppose the president wants the U.S. to be in the zero spot!
     
  24. zflauaus macrumors 65816

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    #24
    :eek: Does that mean he's going to outlaw the interweb, internet, and any other variation? Damn him.... and Al Gore for creating this mass of tubes!!!
     
  25. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #25
    How far out are you that you don't have cable?

    I go to college in a small town in rural Missouri, and we have 5 mbit cable. Granted, we pay out the ass for it and we're lucky to hit 3 mbit in a speed test, but hey, at least we have it.

    I had always assumed that most of the country had cable, guess not :\

    It's not the cheapest, and the latency is atrocious, so online gaming wouldn't be an option, but you might want to see if any of the cell providers have a high speed wireless network in your area. On T-Mobile's EDGE network, I can get about 150kbit down when I'm tethered with that. Certainly not the fastest, but it's better than dial up. And depending on what you currently have for a cell phone, the price may not actually be that bad if you can add an unlimited data plan and buy something like a Blackberry.


    On an unrelated note, I'd like to see more companies than Verizon getting FTTH. If SBC/ATT/Whatever the hell they're called now could start rolling it out, that would be awesome. But I kinda doubt that happening, because it seems like they love their phone network too much, always acting like it's sooooo much better than cable when it isn't. But whether or not they like it, the aging copper wires going to many homes could never carry the amount of data fiber can.

    It's just as of right now, I don't see Verizon going outside of their landline area with FiOS, and I don't see ATT touching FTTH with a ten foot pole. Maybe some other company will start building the infrastructure for it....
     

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