Where can I find the serial number of my lens? (for a warranty registration)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by seenew, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. seenew macrumors 68000

    seenew

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #1
    Yep, my new 10-22 came today! :D I'm trying to fill out the online form for the warranty, but I don't know where to find the serial number of the lens. Any help?

    Also, on a side note, does anyone know if just a regular 77mm UV filter will work with the EFS 10-22? The glass bulges out a tiny bit in the front, so I was just wondering if there as a special filter I had to get, or if just any 77mm will work.
     
  2. snap58 macrumors 6502

    snap58

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Location:
    somewhere in kansas
    #2
    Take the back cap off, it is on the bottom that mounts to the camera.
     
  3. seenew thread starter macrumors 68000

    seenew

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #3
    Thanks! It wasn't there, but when I looked, I saw it on the bottom side of the lens when it's mounted on the camera. Didn't see it earlier because it's just raised plastic, so it's the same color as the body of the lens.
     
  4. sjl macrumors 6502

    sjl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2004
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #4
    You need to be careful when getting a filter for an ultra-wide-angle lens (and the 10-22 is definitely an ultra-wide-angle lens). If it's too large (measured from top to bottom when you put it flat on a table), you'll find it'll impede taking shots, especially at the widest settings.

    It might be worth shelling out for a slimline UV filter to try to avoid this. (Disclaimer: I don't really know this for certain. Maybe duck in to your local B&M camera shop and chat with an expert there; they may be able to help. If so, do them the courtesy of buying the filter there, please.)

    The other thing to be aware of (although you didn't ask): polarising lenses on ultra-wide lenses can give peculiar results, due to the change of angle of the incoming light. Probably best to not use one at all, or to try it out before using it for "serious" shots.
     
  5. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #5
    when you use a pol filter at 10-20mm you will find that you get a dark blob on the sky. thats because only the center part of the filter will work, the rim of the filter gets the light at an angle. try to avoid pol filters unless you need them for artistic effects. in general filters will lead to more glare and less sharpness at the edges. most of the time i leave the uv filter on for protection. but i take mine off for important shots.
     
  6. seenew thread starter macrumors 68000

    seenew

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #6
    Yeah, that's why I'm looking into just a cheap one, like $15-25.
    Thanks for the advice, both of you, on the polarizer. I wouldn't have thought about that..

    I assume the lens hood for this beast is a must?
    :( @ $30 more
     
  7. Zeke macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville, SC
    #7
    Actually, this is because the wide angle of the sky is showing more than 90 degrees which means you're going to be moving across the angle that light in the sky is polarized. So, you end up with a 'blob' where the polarizing filter has the most effect surrounded by where it has the least. It has nothing to do with the angle incident on the filter.

     

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