Where do you look for a programming gig?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by Heynow, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    #1
    I work for a Mac Developer named Heynow Software. Recently we've been getting more and more offers to work on great Mac projects. However we currently are not setup to deliver to that capacity. While we spend time building up our development force I was brought on to help figure out a way of filling all the positions clients are asking us to work on. Therefore we have added a recruitment division to our company.

    I’ve been searching high and low for a central place that Mac developers go to look for gigs.

    If you know of any please let me know?

    Thanks,
    Darren
    darren@heynow.com
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    #2
    Careerbuilder.com and monster.com are always a nice place to start. Craigslist...even here.
     
  3. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    #3
    I would just hire software engineering/computer science university graduates, and train them for a few months. Every university spends a lot of time on C. University means University, not tech school. Also anyone one with UI development experience in any other language would be a good asset. I am pretty sure its impossible to hire any experienced mac developers at the moment ... unless u are dropping some huge cash ... enough to take them away from their current job.

    I think the university year is ending this month. you better recruit them before its over.
     
  4. Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2000
  5. macrumors 6502a

    Sayer

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #5
    There are probably a lot of people who could get in on some work-for-hire or contract Mac development. It's just a matter of finding where they hang out *ahem*.

    You don't need to offer a lot of cash to get someone to do a side project, just something compelling or different and an equitable compensation arrangement.

    From past experience things that don't help:

    Outrageous deadlines.
    Vague specs.
    Trying to make Mac software work/look like Windows/Linux apps.​
     
  6. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #6
    There is something to be said for this. You want a mix of staff. Some new CompSci. graduates will bring some theoretical background. Some others with 20 years of experience It is best to have a mix of people with varied background. Don't get them all from the same place.

    BTW my company will pay me $2,500 if I can find someone to apply and they get hired. Try that. Offer a reward to your current employees if they can get their buddies to work for you.
     
  7. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    #7
  8. macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #8
    Is getting good computer scientists / programmers really that hard nowadays? Christ, I need to pull my finger out.
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    lee1210

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #9
    it actually is. We have a similar incentive for recruiting engineers. I'm in Austin, tx and the market is pretty tight.

    -Lee

    P.S. It's not hard to hire any programmer, it is to find someone good.
     
  10. macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #10
    What constitutes good though? Is it a heavy theoretical background in computer science or someone with proven experience in large projects or just somewhere in the middle. How important is theoretical knowledge in comparison to being able to "just do it"?
     
  11. macrumors 68040

    lee1210

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #11
    Depends on the position. For a senior engineer/architect position some theoretical background is important for big picture items. In my opinion it's more about having the right attitude, being willing to work hard, being willing to learn, and not being a dick. Once those qualifications are met, as long as someone has some solid experience I consider them good.

    This may or may not include a degree. I don't assume that someone is a good programmer because they have a degree. I was an awful programmer when I graduated. Being excited about the technology and solving problems, and being able to work in a team are really important. Experience can be misleading, as well. There are some really bad programmers where I work that have lots of experience. They also fail the "not being a dick" test, though.

    Sadly, it's really a feeling. It's not always right, but you can stick people in a room with other engineers and tell a lot about their level of confidence, their knowledge, and if they're a dick. This makes resume sweeping extremely difficult.

    -Lee
     
  12. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    #12
    I'm glad to see someone who doesn't believe a degree makes a programmer. Personally I have been in IT for 30+ years working for 12+yrs at General Dynamics in Aerospace Technology and now 15+years in Healthcare all in Systems Analyst/Design/Development positions and all without a degree.

    All because one person at GD was willing to look past the "degree" and hire me to "get the job done", which I did. :D

    As a matter of fact at my current position, I'm the lead for the entire office, and senior techinal liason for our department.

    To me, the most important aspect of a good programmer/designer is imagination and the ability to communicate well with others.
     

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