who here has dual citizenship?

Discussion in 'Community' started by wrc fan, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. wrc fan macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #1
    So who here has dual citizenship? And how did you go about getting it?

    I'm wondering since my sister and I have been trying to find some way to get it "jus sanguinis" but as of yet we have had no avail. The UK is so stubborn and only lets one generation born outside of the UK get British citizenship (my Grandmother was born in Scotland), so we can't figure out a way around that. And my mom who does qualify doesn't even care about it :mad: .

    Then I looked at German citizenship because my Great-grandparents on my Dad's side were from Germany, but I found out that back in the 1870 through early 1900's if you lived outside Germany for 10 years you lost your citizenship there. I wonder how strickly they check that? For instance how do they prove when said person left Germany? Ellis Island wasn't around back when he first came.
     
  2. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

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    #2
    I don't know how the situation is in other countries but AFAIK Germany doesn't allow you to have dual citizenship, you have to choose after you're qualified to be german, again, AFAIK...
     
  3. russed macrumors 68000

    russed

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    #3
    i don't, but my girlfriend does. she was born in Russia and when she was 7 she came and lived over here in the UK.


    Another person i know has british, chinese, portugese and american citizenship. its a long story as to how she got all them but it look like she is collecting them!
     
  4. wrc fan thread starter macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #4
    I spoke with the German consul here in California, and the laws have been changed so you can have dual citizenship as long as you were born with both. (click here for reference)
     
  5. wrc fan thread starter macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #5
    I helped my now ex-girlfriend in obtaining the information and documentation to gain her Italian citizenship. Italian's are so much easier than any other country. There is no generational limit to being born outside of Italy, and if you marry someone and live in Italy for 3 months then you gain Italian citizenship.
     
  6. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #6
    Ireland allows grandchildren of those born in Ireland(all 32 counties) to gain an Irish passport. Much better for travelling in the Middle East than a U.K. one. They also allow dual nationality.
     
  7. Spizzo macrumors 6502

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    #7
    I'm a US cit. but thinking hard about getting my Irish citizenship. They require you to live there for 5 years (i think) before you are eligable, unless you are 2 gen's under an Irish Citizen. (I'm 3).

    If I was single I'd do it in a heartbeat...
     
  8. wrc fan thread starter macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #8
    Unfortunately I got ruled out of Irish citizenship because I am a great-grandchild, and they have this rule:

    And my mom (who again might qualify for Irish citizenship), was not registered with them.
     
  9. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #9
    This is kinda interesting. I have a decent shot at re-aquiring British citizenship (I gave it up at 13), but I also have links to Japan and Switzerland.

    Anyone care to chime in on the rules for citizenship for those countries? I have heard Switzerland is particularily difficult, but I have blood and relatives, although most are now dead.

    Thanks.

    btw, interesting about Italy, I wish I had Italian lineage...though I suppose I could find a nice Italian girl. Besides, I can actually speak Italian, one of the few languages I can deal with.
     
  10. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #10
    Me

    New Zealand & Netherlands...

    Netherlands by virtue of a parent, New Zealand by birth...
     
  11. wrc fan thread starter macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #11
    Switzerland is very hard. See here for info. Basically what it looks like is unless everyone in your family from the time they left Switzerland up to you were only Swiss citizens, then you do not qualify.
     
  12. garybUK Guest

    garybUK

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    #12
    as far as im aware if you have nationailty for any country in the European Union then you can work/live in any other European country, we have a Spannish lady at work who lives and works in the UK and there is very little to do. In places like Spain you just need to pop to a local police station and get a ID card. So if you gain Italian nationality you could live/work in the UK.
     
  13. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

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    #13
    Hi, thanks for the link, a lot of good info, still, it depends on a lot of conditions here in Germany to see wether or not you're allowed to have dual citizenship, it's not a general rule, it was a very helpful link, thanks again...
     
  14. wrc fan thread starter macrumors 65816

    wrc fan

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    #14
    I'm not sure who you were directing that towards, but I can say for certain that I don't qualify for Italian citizenship, unless I were to marry an Italian citizen, which I don't see for me on the horizon since my ex and I broke up.

    But your point about EU citizens living/working anywhere in the EU is part of the reason why I was looking into German citizenship. I'm also guessing it is why Blue Velvet is able to live in the UK.
     
  15. Benj macrumors regular

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    #15
    There are also rules for commonwealth nationals that allow UK residency (hence my part of London being full up with Aussies, NZers and SAFers) ;)
     
  16. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #16
    oaklandbum, if the purpose of this thread is to try and detemine the easiest way to gain permanent legal residence in Europe, your best bet (imo) is to either:

    - have a skill in demand in your "new" country and have a company sponsor your entrance for a long-term work visa.

    - marry a citizen of potential host country, depending (to be used in tandem with other options merely to expedite process)

    - enter host country in a relatively easy work-vector, such as TOEFL (teaching english as a foreign language). Either through savings, higher education, under-the-table supplemental income and or frugal living, reside in said country long enough to be naturalised.

    - learn as many foreign languages as possible (that are relevant...again for expediting, although immersion in said country should prove sufficient).

    - become ridiculously rich, either buying citizenship outright (such as monaco,iirc) or more indirectly by the nature of every government likes rich citizens.

    - join military forces and hope to be posted in Europe.

    - take foreign service exam. Defect. (ok, sorta joking here)

    I am seriously considering TOEFL, as I am young enough to take the adventure and recover if it goes awry...anyway, these are not definitive suggestions, just plausible ones...fwiw.
     
  17. Hoef macrumors 6502a

    Hoef

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    #17
    I knew it!!! .... You always recognize the Dutch ancestry :D Same here, I am from the Netherlands but whish I could have dual citizenship (NL & US for example). I belief when I have a child here in the US it will have dual cit. (new Dutch rule, wasn't allowed before).
     
  18. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #18
    Part Australian, part British which is really quite useful. Thanks mum! :)
     
  19. mmmdreg macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

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    #19
    I was born in Japan. My mum is Japanese and my dad English. So I got both citizenships. After a year I moved to England where I stayed for 5. Then I moved to Australia. After a while here as a permanent resident, I applied for Australian citizenship. Now Japan doesn't allow dual citizenships so I was going to have to decide what I wanted to keep by the time I was 21. Little did I know that as I was over 16 when I applied for the Australian one, I was renouncing my Japanese one. So I am now just English and Australian.

    The funny thing is, I could very well be all three still if I wasn't so honest. It appears there is a bit of a communication gap between countries so it wasn't until I went to renew my Japanese passport (over a year after getting my Australian citizenship), that I was told I was no longer eligible because I filled out on the form that I was now Australian as well as English. If I happened to be too lazy or for some other reason, did not fill that part out, Japan would still not know that I am Australian. =) Clever huh?
     
  20. pivo6 macrumors 68000

    pivo6

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    #20
    My parents were born in the Netherlands, but became US citizens in 1966. I was born in the U.S (1965), and as far as I know, I am just a US citizen. I wasn't aware of an new rule concerning this. My aunt moved back to the Netherlands about 10 years ago, and she re-qualified for her pension.

    My wife was a Canadian citizen when I married her, but she has since dropped it when she became a US citizen.
     
  21. krollster macrumors member

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    #21
    My partner has Irish and Australian passports (Irish born but moved to Aus as a kid). Talk about a handy combination.

    It's just not fair!
     
  22. EGT macrumors 68000

    EGT

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    #22
    I have dual citizenship. British and Irish. Very handy if i've lost one of my passports which happens quite a lot.
     
  23. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #23
    I just applied for British citizenship a couple weeks ago. My mom was born there, which as you discovered makes it very easy. I'd work on convincing your mother.
     
  24. MemphisSoulStew macrumors regular

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    #24
    I have UK and US citizenship. My dad was a Filipino who became a US citizen on joining the US Navy after WW2. My mum is English, and they met when my dad was stationed in London in the mid 1950's. I was born in London, giving me UK citizenship, and I also qualified for US citizenship through my dad. I've lived in the UK for most of my life apart from when my dad was posted to Norfolk, VA, then to Naples - two years in each I think, but we were back in England by the time I was five years old.

    It's only recently that I've bothered getting a UK passport - I always travelled on my US passport, but travel in Europe is easier with a UK passport.
     
  25. _bnkr612 macrumors 6502a

    _bnkr612

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    #25
    I am a tri-cit.

    I was born in the USA, my father was born in England though lived in New Zealand where his father was from. He had a dual citizenship and my brother's and I luckily (my father is smart) got tri-citizenships when we were teenager's and before Bush2 was in office making enemies with the world.

    Only downside, three passports... j/k.
     

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