why apps take so long to open!?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by NarKEd, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. NarKEd macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    #1
    Im wondering why does it take soooo long to open an application in osx,the calculator takes like 6 seconds to open! its just stays there jumping and bouncing like laughing at you but it just dont opens until you already did the math for yourself. (I have a g4 733mhz 768mb ram) I remember that in my g3 333mhz running os9 I opened the calculator almoust instantly.
    and all the applications in general take so long to open. why?
    and what factor could increse that speed: ram, cpu, frontside bus?
     
  2. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #2
    Granted my system's a bit faster than yours (1.25 GHz), but my apps don't take forever to open - just tried Calculator and it took 1 second. Try repairing permissions.

    Also, do you leave your computer on at night? If not, open up Terminal and type the following commands:

    sudo /etc/daily
    sudo /etc/weekly
    sudo /etc/monthly

    This might help to speed it up.
     
  3. NarKEd thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    #3
    my hard disc is almoust full and I think needs to be defragmented maybe thats a cause. yes I leave my computer on 24hrs. what does that commands do?
     
  4. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #4
    Probably about time you ran fsck and/or Disk Utility, both or either until they hit a clean pass.

    Sometimes the OS will begin slowing down as the catalog/file system problems build up.
     
  5. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #5
    Well, having a disk drive that's almost full could cause really slow performance as RAM fills up. You should really consider cleaning up the drive. Defragmenting would help somewhat, but only if there's plenty of space available for it to use in the process. Can you write some things to CD-R and remove them from the hard drive?

    If you've got the computer on 24/7, various logs and other system items are cleaned up automatically.
     
  6. flyfish29 macrumors 68020

    flyfish29

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Location:
    New HAMpshire
    #6
    My iMac 1 ghz calc. takes less than 2 seconds- 768 mb running Panther. I don't repair permissions often enough...only three times since Sept 03. I don't install much extra software though. I also have lots of space on hd.
     
  7. NarKEd thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    #7
    I levae the computer on most of the times but its not really a 24/7 maybe I leave it on fot 2 days and the shut it dows for some time and like that..
    I have like 2.43 gigs of free hard disc space is that sufficient for defragmenting a 40 gig hard drive? is there a free application to defragment a hard drive?
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #8
    Buy new HD, move stuff to new drive.

    The lack of space is probably causing a lot of slowdowns, I missed the HD being full on the first pass.

    OS X, not only needs quite a bit of memory, but also a bit of free room on the HD.
     
  9. titaniumducky macrumors 6502a

    titaniumducky

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2003
    #9
    Also, turn off the bouncing. It really kills processor time and is not that cool. Especially when opening multiple apps at once it makes a huge difference.
     
  10. titaniumducky macrumors 6502a

    titaniumducky

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2003
    #10
    BTW, on my eMac, Calculator just opened in one arrow flash (I have bouncing turned off, but I think they're timed the same).
     
  11. NarKEd thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    #11
    turning off the bounciness really helped in the opening time, it almoust opened in half of the time. thanks.
     
  12. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #12
    Well, with Panther (10.3.x), the operating system will do some de-fragmentation of files automatically as long as they're 20 MB or smaller. As far as I know, there is no free application. 2.43 GB is sufficient for most de-fragmenting applications and I would think that your system would be running better.

    My system runs the cleanup scripts at 3:14 a.m. every day, one day a week, a one day a month, depending on the script. Also, indexing of your user space contents should be done around 4:30 a.m. Saturday or Sunday morning.
     
  13. andrewm macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #13
    Optimisation

    I'm surprised that no one has yet mentioned a powerful solution, that of rebuilding the prebinding from Terminal or some third-party system utility program. Many cases of slow launches have been cleared up or at least ameliorated somewhat by doing this. Installers for programs normally run this after installation, but only for the files that they install.

    To do this, open Terminal and type:

    sudo update_prebinding -root /

    (with an underscore between 'update' and 'prebinding,' a dash before 'root,' and a slash after space at the end), then press return. You will be asked for your user password; type it in and press return again.

    I do grant that hard drive space will almost certainly also be a contributing factor. Perhaps I will not inconvenience you overmuch if I share a story from my experiences. I used to own a Power Mac G4 with 16 Gb or so of drive space, but only a few hundred megabytes were available. Warning messages that my drive was almost full constantly popped up on the screen. One day it became corruped so badly that, if I recall correctly (this was years ago), it refused to boot. According to the tech support person whom I called, the system must have overwritten essential parts of itself with such limited space available. I eventually solved it by booting from a different drive, but... ugh.

    Long story short, rebuild the prebinding, repair permissions, and, if you have fewer than four gigabytes available on your drive, buy a new, larger hard drive if you can at all afford one.

    I hope that this helps, somewhat, and hasn't put you to sleep with the long bedtime story in the middle.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
     
  14. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #14
    I considered mentioning updating prebinding, but I read somewhere that it's completely unnecessary under OS 10.2 and later, because it's done automatically.
     
  15. slooksterPSV macrumors 68030

    slooksterPSV

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2004
    Location:
    Nowheresville
    #15
    Here is the most straight forward answer:

    For a hard drive to run at almost optimal speed, you need 10% of that hard disk space free. Also if you want faster load times, get a drive that has an 8MB cache. Take some time to organize your files such as MP3's into one folder, Text Documents into another, etc. This helps the OS figure out exactly where to get the file. E.G.
    --Fragmented Full Hard Drive-- (unorganized)
    OS Looks for file
    file is in a drive that is all clustered up
    finally finds the file in fragments around the drive
    takes longer to load

    --Defragmented Hard Drive-- (organized)
    OS Looks for file according to folder specifications
    file is in a drive that isn't all clustered up
    finds the file in one together allocation
    takes shorter to load
     
  16. flyfish29 macrumors 68020

    flyfish29

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Location:
    New HAMpshire
    #16
    You know I even got a difference opening apps by changing other setting in the dock prefs. Not near as much as the bouncing, but the hide the dock seemed to make a second diff in some apps.
     

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