why is my ip adress 10.0.1.4?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by lucface, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. lucface macrumors regular

    lucface

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    #1
    im using dhcp,.. heres a link to a screen shot.
    http://photobucket.com/albums/a149/lucfacece/
    i use a dynex router. DX-E401. i have an airport xpress pluged into it.
    i connect via airport.
    i want a normal and compatible ip adress. it used to be 192.168.0.something....

    I EDITED THIS POST to explain why i removed the picture from the link. my problem is solved. the responding posts will help annyone with my issue. and i dont want my network preferences up for all to see any longer than nessasary.
     
  2. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    Location:
    Solon, OH
    #2
    192.168.x.x and 10.x.x.x are reserved IP address ranges for local networks, like those found behind a router (which is the setup you have). That is a perfectly normal IP address for such a network. As for why you got a 10.x.x.x address instead of a 192.168.x.x address, that is determined in the router settings for DHCP. Look at your router's documentation if you want to change it, although it won't make any difference for things like accessing the Internet.
     
  3. reh macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    #3
    I prefer the 10.x.x.x addresses because they're usually shorter and quicker to type.
     
  4. njmac macrumors 68000

    njmac

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
  5. lucface thread starter macrumors regular

    lucface

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    #5
    and i says my router is 10.0.1.1 when i know its 192.168.x.x

    i would be down with keeping it but i need a 192..... because i have a stupid router thats vary limited and im trying to foward a port, and bla bla, i dont want to get into it. its a hole other subject.
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    Ummm, okay, back up a step.

    You have an internet service provider and a cable modem or a DSL modem or something like that, right? It gives you a *real* IP address. Then you connect the Dynex to it, and it takes that real (upstream) address and then creates a new local network, on which it sits at 192.168.0.1 and serves IP addresses to the things connected to it of the form 192.168.x.x. *INCLUDING* the Airport Express, if it's plugged in by wires. The Airport address then has an upstream IP address 192.168.x.x. It takes that upstream address, and sits on a new local network as 10.0.1.1. The computer is then on the Airport's network.

    I'm afraid that's exactly the way that routers work. Even if you can assign 192.168.x.x addresses to both subnetworks, 192.168.0.1 when requested of the Airport will be different (it will point to the Aiport itself) than 192.168.0.1 on the Dynex (which will point to the Dynex).

    The only way you can have more than one router on the network, of which I am aware, and have only one local area network addressing scheme is if they are all wireless, and all of the routers save one (which connects to the modem or internet connection) are wirelessly extending / joining the existing network.

    I don't think there's any way to do that with wired connections.
     
  7. ITASOR macrumors 601

    ITASOR

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Location:
    Oneida, NY
    #7
    Look in your router settings by typing http://routerip/ into safari. There should be an option under DHCP for either 192, or 10. I like 10's because if someone gets into your network (bad person) it may throw them off. Little stretch, but hey! Yeah, there should be a setting there somewhere.
     
  8. tobio macrumors regular

    tobio

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    London
    #8
    it could very well be that your airport is giving out DHCP addresses as well as your router. I run a similar setup to you (ordinary router into an airport express, 192.168.x network range) and you need to go into the airport express admin utility and make sure that the tickbox saying give out ip addresses is UNTICKED. Since i did that on mine, wireless devices and ethernet pcs alike all get 192.168 addresses, and portforwarding works hapily wherever I want it to go, wired or wireless.

    If the air express is not misbehaving, then either your router configuration has changed, or something else on your network is advertising itself as a DHCP server and answering your computer's requests first.
     
  9. lucface thread starter macrumors regular

    lucface

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005

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