Why the name change?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by oclor, May 24, 2006.

  1. oclor macrumors regular

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    #1
    So I just got a MacBook last week and have been all over the internet trying to search for accesories. I wanted a case/sleeve, some more RAM, and ascreen protector. What pissed me off is that everytime i put anything into a search engine about the MacBook I get MacBook Pro stuff. In the good old days when I had an iBook there was no mixing up that with a powerbook. So i got to wondering why they changed the name in the first place and I remembered that Jobs said they wanted to get the "Power" out of the name because the old processors consumed too much power. That makes no sense however since my MacBook now gets the same amount of battery life as my old iBook, and also burn my thighs because its so hot. So why did they change the name?
     
  2. yippy macrumors 68020

    yippy

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    #2
    He didn't say anything about wanting to get rid of the power.

    What they wanted was the name "Mac" in all of their computer models. Apparently some people would hear "PowerBook" and not know that it was a Mac, so they wanted to fix that.
     
  3. dr_lha macrumors 68000

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    #3
    That, and although PowerBooks weren't originally powered by PowerPC processors, people tend to associate the word "Power" with "PowerPC" these days. So out with the PowerPC goes the Power name.
     
  4. oclor thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    I remember in the keynote he emphasized how they wanted to get the "power" out of their, but now that i think about that maybe he meant he wanted it out because it was Power PC. But yea your explanation was mentioned aswell and makes sense.
     
  5. iBeard macrumors regular

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    #5
    He never said that.
     
  6. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #6
    I wish the MacBooks had more distinct names, like iMacBook vs. MacBook Pro or MacBook Mini vs. MacBook Pro.

    As things are, saying "MacBook" might been either the smaller models or a generic word for both.
     
  7. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #7
    Steve Jobs at the MBP introduction: "It's a new name because we're kinda done with power, and we want the Mac name in our products."
     
  8. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #8
    Three purposes were met:

    1. Add "Mac" for better brand recognition.

    2. Remove "Power", further severing the connection to PowerPC.

    3. Shake things up. A newly named line of Macs garners interest.

    Also, it's silly of us, but it's human nature that if you own an iBook, you're more likely to feel your hardware needs upgrading when iBooks are replaced by MacBooks than if Apple had issued "new iBooks".
     
  9. iBeard macrumors regular

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    #9
    well....

    there you go. :eek:
     
  10. imacintel macrumors 68000

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  11. thegreatluke macrumors 6502a

    thegreatluke

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    #11
    They were always accompanied with PowerPC processors, except back fifteen years ago when Apple switched from Motorola 680k processors to PowerPC processors.

    The MacBook Pros have Intel processors.

    And to the OP, maybe searching for "MacBook -pro" would help?
     
  12. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #12
    From the introduction of the PowerBook (the 100 in October 1991) until the first PPC PowerBook (the 5300, introduced in August 1995), PowerBooks ran on Motorola 68000-series processors.
     
  13. imacintel macrumors 68000

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    #13

    ahh..i see. But doesn't motorola make PowerPC?

    EDIT.OHH. I see now.IBM in partnership with motorola makes PPC.
     
  14. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #14
    Almost everything you ever wanted to know about PPC (and some things you didn't) can be found on Wikipedia...
     
  15. mojohanna macrumors 6502a

    mojohanna

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    #15
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but all of the chips since at least the 603 processors were "power" processors. Apple has been using these since the Mid 90's. I remeber looking for a computer after college and getting a power pc based performa.

    I would have to say that all of the powerbooks have always used a "power" chip. I think it would be more appropriate to state that the powerbooks only used the "G4" or 4th generation "power" chips.


    Someone beat me to this. sorry
     
  16. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

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    #16
    Yes, but Apple had PowerBooks before the 603...
     
  17. macOSX-tastic macrumors 6502a

    macOSX-tastic

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    #17
    i thought that "Powerbook" was one of the most creative names for a notebook ever. :D but MacBook is growing on me, and i guess i will have to get used to it. :D MacBook = new hotness. powerbook = old and busted.

    :D:D

    S
     
  18. portent macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    Oddly enought, the first models weren't just "PowerBooks."

    They were "Macintosh PowerBooks."

    That's right: No PowerPC chip, and they had "Mac" in the name.
     
  19. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #19
    The PowerPC 603 was not the first PowerPC processor. That honor goes to the PowerPC 601. As others have said, The first PowerBook was introduced October 1991. The AIM Alliance of Apple/IBM/Motorola was formed in 1991 to design and build single-chip versions of IBM's POWER 1 processor chipset. The first PowerPC-based desktops--the Power Macintosh 6100/7100/8100--were not introduced until March 2004. The first PowerPC-based PowerBook was the PowerBook 5300, which was introduced in August 1995. It was based on the PowerPC 603e. This was nearly four years after the introduction of the first PowerBook.
     

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