Why won't this 4.4GB file burn to a 4.7GB disc?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by AlBDamned, Mar 4, 2007.

  1. AlBDamned macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #1
    Hi guys,

    I'm trying to burn to a disc a file that's 4.43GB.

    I've got a spindle of brand new, Imation DVDs that are supposedly 4.7GB and it's saying the the file is too large.

    Is this right and another symptom of the differences in opinion of how many megabytes are in a gigabyte, or is there something wrong?

    I've only ever experience this before when a file definitely was over the disc size but the sizes corresponded then.

    Cheers in advance! :)
     
  2. VortexOfPain macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #2
    A 4.7GB disc does not have 4.7GB of usable room, they usually have 4.3GB of usable room on them. Double check by inserting a blank disc and getting info on that disc, most I have seen is 4.38 usable on a single side DVD - which is really close to how much you need. If you have Toast, it has a built in feature to automatically fit to DVD... that is if it is a Video_TS folder and not data.
     
  3. AlBDamned thread starter macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #3
    Yep, you've hit the nail there. Looking closely the disc has 4.38 and the file is 4.43 so it's not going to fit.

    It's all data, media files and documents so I guess I'll have to split it across two discs. Cheers for the help :)
     
  4. Fearless Leader macrumors 68020

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    Mar 21, 2006
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    Hoosiertown
  5. eRondeau macrumors 6502a

    eRondeau

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    Mar 3, 2004
    Location:
    Canada's South Coast
    #5
    How do media manufacturers consistently get away with this??? Their "actual" capacity is always well below their "advertised" capacity. Yet it keeps happening! It's like buying a 18-cubic-foot fridge but only getting 16! Or a 6-channel surround-sound system that only comes with 5 speakers! Yet consumers continue to accept this -- and we're the ones who get caught, because we can't burn a 4.4GB file on a 4.7GB disc! I'm mad as hell and I'm not gonna take it anymore!!!!!!
     
  6. emac82 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    NB, Canada
    #6
    I think it has to do with 1MB being = 1024KB, not 1000....what I mean is that if you buy a 60GB only like 55.5GB is accessible, because of the screwed up measurements..I read about it once but I can't remember the full details..
     
  7. apfhex macrumors 68030

    apfhex

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    Aug 8, 2006
    Location:
    Northern California
    #7
    That's right. The disc/hdd/etc manufacturers measure in 1MB = 1000KB, whereas all computers measure in 1MB = 1024KB. They (the manufacturers) obviously do this as a marketing tactic.
     
  8. eRondeau macrumors 6502a

    eRondeau

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    Mar 3, 2004
    Location:
    Canada's South Coast
    #8
    You are absolutely correct of course. The source of my frustration is the fact that we, as consumers, continue to accept this misrepresentation by the media manufacturers. The title of this thread says it all -- "Why won't this 4.4GB file burn to a 4.7GB disc?" Because it's NOT a 4.7GB disc at all -- it's only 4.3GB -- that's the way it is, you can't do anything about it, sorry about your luck. Sucker!
     
  9. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #9
    I could be wrong, but I don't think the 1024/1000 bytes thing applies to optical media. The disc is really able to hold 4.7 gigs, however, there's overhead taken up by the file system once you format it, leaving you with 4.3. So technically, the media manufacturers are doing nothing wrong with that claim.
     
  10. Father Jack macrumors 68020

    Father Jack

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    Location:
    Ireland
    #10
    OR If your burner allows, use a dual layer DVD blank.

    FJ
     
  11. AlBDamned thread starter macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #11
    yeah I might look at that for future reference, although given the price of D/L discs it seems a waste for just such a tiny bit over. All the files are zipped anyway so I'll probs just split them evenly over two S/L ones.
     
  12. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

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    Jan 20, 2005
    #12
    It's important to note that it's not the media manufacturers who are "getting away with" anything...they are using proper terminology. It's the computer operating systems that are erroneously using the term "gigabyte" when they are actually referring to gibibytes.

    That "4.4 GB" file you see on your computer is actually 4.4 GiB, or about 4.72 GB.
     
  13. Mr Skills macrumors 6502a

    Mr Skills

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    Nov 21, 2005
    #13
    Your etymology may be correct, but that is not the accepted, everyday use of the term in the real world. Computers have been around too long. It is just an excuse for computer companies to use in court.
     
  14. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #14
    Organisation intergouvernementale de la Convention du Mètre has this to say:

    1 KiB = 2^10 B = 1024 B, où B désigne l’octet. Bien que ces préfixes n’appartiennent pas au SI, ils doivent être utilisés en informatique afin d’éviter un usage incorrect des préfixes SI.

    My translated copy of their guidelines says:

    1 KiB = 2^10 B = 1024 B, where B denotes a byte. Although these prefixes are not part of the SI, they should be used in the field of information technology to avoid the incorrect usage of the SI prefixes.
     
  15. MacBoobsPro macrumors 603

    MacBoobsPro

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    #15
    IT IS false advertising because the company selling the products know that its not 60GB, its 55GB. So they should not be allowed to use 60GB or even GBs.

    It should be labelled accurately.

    You wouldnt pay for a 5.0 Litre engine in a car and settle for a 4.0 Litre when you got it would you?

    I think we should cause a stink. Just for the hell of it. :mad:
     
  16. Mr Skills macrumors 6502a

    Mr Skills

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    Nov 21, 2005
    #16
    Someone already tried.
     
  17. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    Jul 4, 2004
    #17

    After reading this thread I think they should really be called 'gibberbytes'. ;)
     
  18. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    Aug 30, 2003
    #18
    "gibibyte" etc. were only adopted by IEC in the late 1990s, long after media manufacturers started playing these games.
     
  19. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island
    #19
    Computers use the

    1024 bytes == 1KB
    1024 Kb == 1MB
    1024 MB == 1GB
    1024 GB == 1TB
    1024 TB == 1PB

    See a pattern here?

    If you read any of the disk manufacturers packing they clearly state that they use 1000 MB == 1GB. Your typical OS calculates 1024MB == 1GB, so your losing about 24MB per GB of storage because of the math.

    It makes a big difference when you buy a 700GB drive these days.
     

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