WiFi speed and iOS syncing

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by Slinkwyde, May 27, 2012.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    #1
    Twigman08 and I were derailing a thread about user adoption of WiFi sync with troubleshooting talk. Summary: His WiFi network is slow and has poor signal range, so he often use USB sync instead. The computer room where the router is used to be a garage, and the house is "pretty big" so he can't connect from his bedroom. I explained that WiFi sync uses the LAN not the Internet, and listed the theoretical speeds for N, G, and USB 2.

    Now I'll reply to his last post.

    If your router, computer, or iOS device is using 802.11g, that would explain it; the connection can only be as fast as the slowest link in the chain. Other factors include interference (other WiFi networks, 2.4GHz microwave ovens, 2.4GHz cordless phones), distance from the router, walls, and LAN congestion.

    Do you see other wireless networks from your neighbors? What router (make and model) do you use?
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    davidg4781

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Location:
    Moulton, TX
    #2
    How can you tell what speed you're on? I recently got a MBP with 802.11n and I can't remember if I have any other devices that still may be on g.
     
  3. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    #3
    I replied back to your private message. I will admit that I'm not 100% network tech savy, but when it comes to computers, hardware, software and all that I'm comfortable with, I'm a programmer. Just never have yet done a lot of studying up on network connectivity.
     
  4. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    #4
    You'd have to look that up for each device, starting with the router. What router (make and model) do you have?
     
  5. thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    #5
    I Googled the router in your PM, and as you suspected it is an 802.11g router. Now it's up to you whether or not you want to upgrade to N router. N routers tend to have significantly better range as well as speed, so upgrading might make you able to connect from your bedroom. It also helps to place routers up high and away from large metal objects.
     
  6. macrumors 65816

    davidg4781

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2006
    Location:
    Moulton, TX
    #6
    So I know my router will support N, but to make sure the network is running on N I have to go through and make sure everything else is on N?

    Bit cumbersome. I did just switch it to N only and everything seemed to work. I might keep it on G for now. No benefit to using N in my current situation, aside from syncing my iPhone.
     
  7. Slinkwyde, May 28, 2012
    Last edited: May 28, 2012

    thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    #7
    No, I wasn't talking about changing any settings. You shouldnt do that. I was only talking about Googling for the hardware specs for each machine/device on your network. Then you'd know which, if any, of them are limited to 802.11g. You could then upgrade/replace those things when N-capable hardware if you so desired.

    You wouldn't have to do that either. On a mixed network 802.11n and 802.11g can talk to each other just fine (N is backwards compatible), but those particular interactions can only happen at 802.11g speeds.

    The setting you're referring to is only on your router. It determines what kinds of machines/devices are allowed on your network: 802.11n only, 802.11g only, or both (mixed network). Setting your N-capable network to G-only will slow it down with no benefit. I recommend mixed, which is the default.

    Make sense now?
     

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