Wii and Projection screen

Discussion in 'Games' started by JMax1, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. JMax1 macrumors 6502

    JMax1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Location:
    Harlem, NY
    #1
    Anyone know if the Wii and sensor bar can hook up to a digital projection screen? My sister has one and I was wondering if I hooked it up to that and put the sensor bar under the projection on wall (or wherever), would it work? Or does it need something the TV has that the wall doesnt?
     
  2. weldon macrumors 6502a

    weldon

    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #2
    It'll work just fine. You can place the sensor bar either on top of or underneath the screen. Nintendo recommends that you place the sensor bar so that it aligns with the center of the screen and flush with the front. You should be able to get close enough with the front of the projection screen so that it will work great. You might even be able to place the sensor bar behind the screen if it will let IR through.

    Here's the Nintendo setup page for the sensor.

    Here's your problem though... The sensor bar has to be attached to the Wii and the projector is also attached to the Wii. With a normal TV, the Wii is placed next to the TV for the video and audio connections so the sensor bar is right there. With a projector, the video is on one side of the room and the screen where the sensor bar would go is on the other side of the room. You might not have enough cable to stretch to both the projector and the sensor bar.

    The cable looks to be pretty long, but I don't know the exact length. Also, there is a rumor that Nyko will come out with a wireless sensor bar which would solve your location problem.
     
  3. gloss macrumors 601

    gloss

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Location:
    around/about
    #3
    They do sell, or are at least working on, extension cables for this situation.
     
  4. weldon macrumors 6502a

    weldon

    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #4
    The sensor bar cable is 138 inches long. An extension cable should work since the cable only carries power for the IR lights in the bar and does not communicate with the Wii. Maybe one will be available soon that will solve your problem.
     
  5. JMax1 thread starter macrumors 6502

    JMax1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Location:
    Harlem, NY
    #5
    I'm sure I could just use an extension cable for the cables leading from Wii to TV and then place the Wii by the screen
     
  6. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #6
    I played a Wii on a projector - it plays fine but the cable is pretty short, we put the Wii in the center of the living room and was able to get the composite cables to stretch.
     
  7. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #7
    How does the sensor bar handle big screens ?

    I too have a HD projectors (as well as a lovely tv in the other room) but was under the impression the sensor bar is limited to a max screen size?

    Is it ?
     
  8. Spanky Deluxe macrumors 601

    Spanky Deluxe

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #8
    I think the real limitation arises because of the distance the wiimote can be from the screen for it to work the pointer properly. If you've got a 10" screen you don't really want to be stuck a couple of meters in front of it after all. This could probably be circumvented though by building your own sensor bar which is a few times longer and where the LEDs are further spaced apart.
     
  9. RoxStrongo macrumors regular

    RoxStrongo

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Location:
    Bournemouth, UK
    #9
    i am still very intrigued to know exactly how the sensor bar works. does anyone have any idea how it calculates the screen position? i came to the conclusion that it doesn't actually need to know how big the tv is because the software will know when the bounds of the screen have been reached so as long as it is centred there will be no problem. what really gets me though is how it knows where the middle of the screen is, as it seems that the settings that indicate whether the bar is above or below a screen are only optional. another thing is why, if the bar is under a screen, it must be placed at the front of the surface rather than in front of the screen. is this because of possible reflection maybe?
     
  10. Spanky Deluxe macrumors 601

    Spanky Deluxe

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #10
    I don't know for sure but I'm guessing that the CMOS sensor in the Wiimote uses the position of the LEDs and its knowledge of their diameter to calculate the remote's orientation and distance from the CMOS sensor. This data is then used to calculate the position and orientation of the wiimote from the screen which is done by using data from the calibration that needs to be done when you first use a wiimote.
     
  11. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
  12. Flowbee macrumors 68030

    Flowbee

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Alameda, CA
    #12
    Here's a video that shows how to make your own battery-powered sensor bar.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdxJt9UNqxE

     
  13. cwright macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Missouri
    #13
    I've been trying to figure out how this will work with my projector setup too. Does anyone have any details on when an extension cable for the sensor bar will be available? It's only 11.5 feet long, and my projector is 20 feet away from the screen. I had planned on just getting extensions for the component cable, but a longer cable for the sensor bar would be ideal.

    I'm also a little concerned with possibly being too close to the screen (or the screen being too big?) Our screen is 10.5 ft wide, with 2 levels of seating (one 8 ft from the screen, the second about 12 ft away).

    With that setup should I be placing the sensor bar above or below the screen? Does it matter?
     
  14. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #14
    Here's a solution.

    Just get a female to female phono connector in order add an extra long phono cable onto the wii's composite yellow to your projector and keep the wii near the screen.

    or by three for component blue,green & red.

    A phono cable and interconnects are cheaper than buying an official sensor bar extender assuming they release one at all.
     
  15. JMax1 thread starter macrumors 6502

    JMax1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Location:
    Harlem, NY
    #15

    That's what I meant to say, I just forgot the nice terms. Thanks!
     
  16. cwright macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Location:
    Missouri
    #16
    Thanks for the link, I may give that a shot. So the sensor bar only connects to the Wii for power then? Seems kinda dumb that they wouldn't make it plug into a separate outlet instead so you could place it anywhere.
     
  17. Spanky Deluxe macrumors 601

    Spanky Deluxe

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #17
    What does the connector for the sensor bar look like? Has anyone used a multimeter to measure the voltage sent by the sensor bar port?

    Here's some stuff I've just written up that some people might want to try if they're serious about this stuff and using the sensor bar with a projector.

    How to use the Wii sensor bar Method 1(provisional and untested):

    Part 1:
    • Buy a Wii.
    • Buy a multimeter.
    • Buy a multi-volt adjustable DC adapter.
    • Buy a few wires.
    • Buy some tape.

    Part 2:
    • Measure the voltage of the Wii sensor bar's output on the Wii

    Part 3:
    • Use the wires to connect the DC adapter's end to the Wii sensor bar's connector (you can probably do this with a bit of tape with a bit of fiddleing). Make sure you get the positive and negative wires the right way round.
    • Set the multi-volt adjustable DC adapter to the voltage you measured before and plug in.

    How to use the Wii sensor bar Method 2(provisional, untested and more risky):

    Step 1:
    • Buy a Wii.
    • Buy a multi-volt adjustable DC adapter.
    • Buy a few wires.
    • Buy some tape.

    Part 2:
    • Use the wires to connect the DC adapter's end to the Wii sensor bar's connector (you can probably do this with a bit of tape with a bit of fiddleing).
    • Set the multi-volt adjustable DC adapter to a low voltage near the bottom of its range and plug in.
    • Increase the DC adapter's voltage until the sensor bar works. If you get to the high end of the DC adapter's voltage then switch the wires round that you wired above.

    I accept no responsibility to any damage caused by people trying this. This is just how I'd go about doing it and is purely theoretical at the moment. Personally, I would use method 2. The DC powered devices I've fiddled with in the past tend to be pretty resiliant to incorrect voltages and being powere the wrong way around. Since all that are involved are LEDs which only work in one orientation, it would work one way and not the other.
     
  18. RoxStrongo macrumors regular

    RoxStrongo

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Location:
    Bournemouth, UK
    #18
    although this is quite a comprehensive explanation of the functionality of the sensor bar its still not quite touching upon how the wii knows what size screen you are using and how it calculates the centre-point of it.
     
  19. Spanky Deluxe macrumors 601

    Spanky Deluxe

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #19
    I reckon it does this by the calibration you need to do with each Wii Remote. If the calibration tells you to aim at the top left corner then the wiimote will be angled differently when using different sized screens.

    Crappy diagram:
    |
    |
    |
    -: wiimote

    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    -: wiimote

    -: is the sensor. |s denote screen height. Obviously the angle from parallel at which the wiimote must be set to in order to point to the top of the screen is greater for bigger screens and at an equal distance from the screen, the LEDs will appear lower on the wiimote's CCD sensor.

    Edit: After doing a bit of googleing it seems that the screen size doesn't matter although what I wrote before this edit is still basically true. The Wii just needs to know where the centre point of the television is in relation to the sensor bar. This distance will obviously be bigger for bigger screens if the sensor bar is placed directly below the screen as in the diagram above.
     
  20. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #20
    The sensor bar works in the same way you don't need a larger mouse pad for larger screens.

    Has anyone seen the video where they used candles instead of the sensor bar? That was pretty funny (and it worked too)
     
  21. bobber205 macrumors 68020

    bobber205

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    Oregon
    #21
    If they let you plug it anywhere, then you would need to use another "power brick" to ensure the power supply is not getting too much power.
     

Share This Page