Will the US save the Saudis or just grab the oilfields?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by skunk, May 30, 2004.

  1. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
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    Republic of Ukistan
    #1
    http://www.forbes.com/markets/newswire/2004/05/30/rtr1389365.html


    Would they be foolish enough to commit further troops to defend Riyadh? Do they care if Mecca and Medina are in the hands of another theocratic regime? Now they've relocated to Iraq, the US could simply throw a cordon around the oilfields ("for the world", of course) and leave the House of Saud to its fate. They could even lay on a "reverse airlift" to bring back the Sauds whom they whisked out of the US just after 9/11.
     
  2. wrldwzrd89 macrumors G5

    wrldwzrd89

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    Solon, OH
    #2
    An unstable Saudi Arabia is bad news for just about everyone - especially those countries that use the oil produced there. I don't think that the US knows what to do, or even what its best options are for dealing with this situation at this point - they're too focused on Iraq. (This is my first post in the Political forum)
     
  3. skunk thread starter macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
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    #3
    Focused is an interesting word to use...:rolleyes:

    Welcome to the world of quick-witted repartee and incisive observation! :D
     
  4. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    Nov 14, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #4
    It just gets more and more disturbing doesn't it? It's also telling that the US is the least supportive of Iran, the biggest democracy in the region, and the most supportive of Saudi Arabia, which is the least democratic. Kind of goes counter to our stated goals.

    As for the question at hand, for sake of US interests, Saudi should get help from somewhere else. Help from the US would only make things worse. Also, the "two state solution" of a new oil field state and a religious state around the holy cities is as realistic as the "three state solution" for Iraq. The US likes atlases appearing as they do. The problem with redrawing any border is that it brings other borders into question, which brings even more borders into question. I don't know Saudi's makeup or geography well, but I'm sure Qatar, Yemen, Kuwait, etc. Wouldn't stand by idly if a land grab of the world's most valuable land was going on.
     

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