Wine Q

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Cooknn, Jun 26, 2006.

  1. Cooknn macrumors 68020

    Cooknn

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers, FL
    #1
    My sister and her husband are going to be celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary and I was thinking about buying them a bottle of wine from 1981. Is it possible to get a good wine that old for US$150 or less? What kind would you recommend? I favor red, but am open to suggestions...
     
  2. UKnjb macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #2
    Hi.

    Lucky your sister and brother-in-law! Such a good present you are thinking of buying them.

    Can I suggest that you buy them a half-bottle of Chateau d'Yquem? It is not a red wine, but a dessert wine (Sauternes), has a very interesting history and is pretty much the best wine I have ever drunk - it is unique IMO.

    it is listed in the USA on at least this site.

    Please let us know what you do end up buying! I, for one, will be curious. :)
     
  3. satty macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2004
    Location:
    You can't beat Wellington on a good day
    #3
    Nice idea.

    But I doubt you will find a 25 year old bottle of wine still drinkable for $150*. There are not many whites that can be stored so long, so I would look for a red straight away.

    The oldest wine I ever drunk was a red - made of Lemberger grapes - with about 10 years of age, which I bought 8 years earlier. I have one bottle Chateau Musar (Lebanon) '95 here, which I intend to drink sometimes this year.

    * Wines of that quality often cost $150 when they get sold first time.
     
  4. Cooknn thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cooknn

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers, FL
    #4
    Yeah, I'm really looking for a needle in a haystack here I know. Bang for the buck so to speak. I don't want to end up with crap just because it's 25 years old, but I'm thinking that my budget might be an issue...

    Thanks for your suggestions. I'll definitely keep you posted.
     
  5. Applespider macrumors G4

    Applespider

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    looking through rose-tinted spectacles...
    #5
    I'd second this. I've only drunk Chateau d'Yquem once at a press wine tasting where it was £185 a bottle - and I've never have described myself as a dessert wine fan but, oh boy, this stuff was ambrosia!
     
  6. lexus macrumors 68000

    lexus

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2006
    Location:
    Depends Greatly On The Weather
    #6
    A bottle of a Yquem Sauternes from 1700 went for $100k in feb and a whole collection will go on sale later on this year with an estimate of $2million.
     
  7. UKnjb macrumors 6502a

    UKnjb

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #7
    Aaaah .... Quality. Please note that I didn't suggest cheap plonk - only the best for your sister! :) I have been searching for details/availability of the 1981 vintage - and it doesn't look as though it was declared. Bummer. It needs to have been maturing for at least 15 years before being drunk - 25 years is just getting into its stride.
     
  8. Cooknn thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cooknn

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers, FL
    #8
    I just got off the phone with a broker here in South Florida. We talked about a Bordeaux from the right bank, which leads with the Merlot grape. I'm learning :eek: He believes he can get me into a 750ml bottle for my budget and that it will be *very* good.

    I found some info here to validate his comment. Also found this 1981 Chateau Cos d Estournel which is from left bank and leads with the Cabernet Sauvignon grape. It's in Los Angeles though...
     
  9. frankblundt macrumors 65816

    frankblundt

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Location:
    South of the border
    #9
    If it works, there's no better metaphor for longevity and the increasing grace, subtlety and complexity that comes with ageing.

    The gamble is of course, if the wine's corked, oxidised, turned thin, bitter, sour or dead, it will provide the exact opposite...

    If they ever drink it - that being the other problem with old, expensive wines - far too many people never even open them, or by the time they do, they find out to their disappointment that they should have drunk it 10 years ago when it was actually at it's peak.

    From memory 1981 wasn't a "great" vintage.

    You might consider less risky alternatives like a 25 year old scotch, or a half case of a well-reviewed Riesling or Cabernet from a recent vintage that will age beautifully over the next 25 years. It doesn't quite give the same wow factor as a 1981 label, but it might prove a happier choice in the long run.
     
  10. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #10
    I can point you towards some excellent Central Coast wines that will age beautifully over the next 10-12 years if you'd like.

    One place I know of will do custom labeling for cheap too. Makes a bottle of wine a much more personal gift.
     
  11. Cooknn thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cooknn

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Location:
    Fort Myers, FL
    #11
    Appreciate that feedback. I've been doing some more reading about the 'risks' involved. And the fact that '81 was not great either. Need to do some more digging to make up my mind on this...

    Thanks, but I think I've waited too long. I'm leaving for TX on Saturday morning and the party is on Sunday. Appreciate the input though :)
     
  12. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #12
    Dunno if you're still after this '81 vintage wine but just let me warn you that if it's not corked/oxidised then it'll probably cost you an arm, a leg and maybe some sternum too.

    Sorry for the Aussie bias, but I know '81 was a pretty decent year for cabernet sauvignon in some of the cooler regions here in South Australia (think Coonawarra) but I really have no idea about the various vintages in the Northern Hemisphere.

    As frankblundt said, buying wine that old is gonna be a gamble. You can't really tell if it's bad from simply looking at it but there are still some tell-tale signs to look out for such as a raised cork, sediment floating on the top (may need to twist the bottle around a bit to find this) and some people even claim they can smell a corked bottle too (it'll be pungent). Of course, if you can smell it's corked without opening it then the wine will be totally gross.

    Having said that, you might have more luck with something that is less of a gamble like a nice frontignac port or maybe a brown liquor. :)
     
  13. Dr.Gargoyle macrumors 65816

    Dr.Gargoyle

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2004
    Location:
    lat: 55.7222°N, long: 13.1971°E
    #13
    My personal favorites are wines from Châteauneuf du Pape. The red ones are a decent bang for the buck.
    If you want to go crazy, I would suggest a Romanée Conti instead of Chateau d'Yquem.
     
  14. MarkCollette macrumors 68000

    MarkCollette

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2003
    Location:
    Calgary, Canada
    #15
    Probably a lot easier to get a hard liquor that old.
     
  15. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    #16
    So you wouldn't recommend a Chateau Ver D'fleur then? Get it? **** Over the Floor?? Ha ha haaa......ergh....:rolleyes:

    A lot of people in this country pooh-pooh Australian table wines. This is a pity, as many fine Australian wines appeal not only to the Australian palette, but also to the cognoscenti of Great Britain.

    "Black Stump Bordeaux" is rightly praised as a peppermint flavoured Burgundy, whilst a good "Sydney Syrup" can rank with any of the world's best sugary wines.

    "Chateau Bleu", too, has won many prizes; not least for its taste, and its lingering afterburn.

    "Old Smokey, 1968" has been compared favourably to a Welsh claret, whilst the Australian wino society thouroughly recommends a 1970 "Coq du Rod Laver", which, believe me, has a kick on it like a mule: 8 bottles of this, and you're really finished -- at the opening of the Sydney Bridge Club, they were fishing them out of the main sewers every half an hour.

    Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is "Perth Pink". This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is BEWARE!. This is not a wine for drinking -- this is a wine for laying down and avoiding.

    Another good fighting wine is "Melbourne Old-and-Yellow", which is particularly heavy, and should be used only for hand-to-hand combat.

    Quite the reverse is true of "Chateau Chunder", which is an Appelachian controle, specially grown for those keen on regurgitation -- a fine wine which really opens up the sluices at both ends.

    Real emetic fans will also go for a "Hobart Muddy", and a prize winning "Cuiver Reserve Chateau Bottled Nuit San Wogga Wogga", which has a bouquet like an aborigine's armpit.
     
  16. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #17

    Hey! My armpit's not that bad. :D
     

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