World of Warcraft - Beginners Tips?

Discussion in 'Games' started by rumbletum, Feb 18, 2006.

  1. rumbletum macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Wolverhampton, UK
    #1
    I've been reading so much about this, I thought with the arrival of my new mac its about time I finally gave it a go, and just wondered what tips any of you have for someone who's new to this game and pretty much new to this entire genre (although I've been playing games for years).

    Also, I keep hearing about different servers, does it make any difference which one I choose (do you have a choice?), bearing in mind I'm in europe and I'll probably only be playing a few hours per week and not the 20 hours per day that some people manage :)

    So any general types and advice would be appreciated, such as do I have to break the habit of a lifetime and read the manual or can I just wing it.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2003
    Location:
    Planet Zebes
    #2
    I would like to add to this. I just picked up World of Warcraft (Target has it for $30 New until the 20th I believe). I'm going to start a game but would like to get some recommendations before I start. I own Warcraft III and the expansion so I know how to play Warcraft, but have never played WoW. Which realm should I choose? I'm not really sure. Which is the easiest, most difficult, most fun (I know that is pure opinion but I'd like to know what most people think)? I'm leaning strongly toward Night Elves, but am also considering Trolls and Humans. Which do most people prefer that play this game?
    Thanks for any info.
     
  3. ugru macrumors regular

    ugru

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    Sep 8, 2002
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    Caput Mundi
    #3
    first of all you have to decide type of server:

    Normal: server mainly based on fighting against mobs, although PVP is possible in the battlegrounds or on the road if you abilitate the option.

    PvP: server in which PvP is possible everywhere freely, more dangerous but more exiting, (one player of the opposite faction can kill you freely even if you are lev 1 and him level 60)

    RP: a server in which players should play the role in a total way, words like lol, woot, noob and others should be forbidden.

    RP-PvP: same as above but PvP enabled...

    then find a guild as soon as possible is the secret of success...

    Warcraft III is a completely different kind of game, you can not compare them.
     
  4. CJM macrumors 65816

    CJM

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    #4
    I feel the need to post here as I believe I am a bit of WoW veteran.

    Ok, there are three... Sorry four, realm types available. You are "assigned" a realm when you first log in and although it is recommended you play here to allieviate congestion on other servers, at the moment you can create characters anywhere you like.

    Ok the realms are as follows:

    PvE or Normal: This is the game but focused mainly upon the combat against monsters. You can still PvP (player vs. player) if you raise your flag (the /pvp command) and you can still enter battlegrounds or arena type places.

    PvP: This is like above except the game world is divided into territories. In enemy or contested territory you are open to attack from members of the opposing faction.

    RP: Short for Role Play, this where you act and talk as though you were that character. Its not for everyone, but some people enjoy story telling and really being involved into their character's life.

    RPPVP: This is a mix between RP and PvP.

    I personally play on a PvE server... It is easier to level and enjoy game content on this server type but if you like a challenge, pick PvP. As I have levelled I feel more of an urge to have made my character on a PvP server. I also have a few low levels on RP realms just for fun.

    As for extra tips;

    -Use the chat channels. Its vital for help, communicating and making friends/allies.
    -Get a guild. One of the major points of MMOs, its important you get a guild as you can make good friends and help each other out.
    -Pick a class to suit your playstyle. Experiment with several classes and characters 'till you find one you like. Don't feel that you have to play each or the first character you make.
    -Dont be tempted to buy equipment from vendors. Its expensive and a very silly thing to do.
    -Socialise. Its the key to getting you up and running with money, friends, equipment and groups. I repeat myself but its REALLY important.

    Have fun and good luck, its an excellent game that you may find you put more hours than you wanted to into it.
     
  5. ugru macrumors regular

    ugru

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    #5

    We were writing the same information at the same time.... LoL
     
  6. rumbletum thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Wolverhampton, UK
    #6
    Thanks for the hints, think I'll go for a PvE server.

    Am I correct in thinking the patches download automatically, or do I have to install them manually?
     
  7. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

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    Feb 19, 2003
    Location:
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    #7
    Me too. Thanks for the tips.
     
  8. ugru macrumors regular

    ugru

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    Sep 8, 2002
    Location:
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    #8
    Each time you start the game the program search the net if your client need to be patched, if so it download it automatically.

    Choose a pvp server when you will reach level cap you will regret the lack of fights against real players. The battlegrounds in the long time become tedious street pvp is more exciting.

    To do the higher level instances you have to do in a big guild. for some of them you need parties fo 40 players!

    if you do casting caracters, above all priest and druids, you will be much requested in raids...servers are usually full of warriors,rogues paladines and shaman.
     
  9. HiRez macrumors 603

    HiRez

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Western US
    #9
    I have played every class except warlock and I find druid to be the most interesting, because of the variety of different playstyles in one character. But it's fun to try them all, as another poster said don't feel locked into your first character choice, make a bunch of different characters and level them up to at least 30 or so to get a flavor for the character (many of the most important class abilities are not available until after level 20 or 30, so it's hard to evaluate a class accurately before then). Also don't neglect the other side (Alliance/Horde), it can be fun to see other areas and play from the other perspective (try to get over any "Horde are ugly!" bias you might have). I would recommend starting your Horde characters on one server and your Alliance characters on another, since there is a limit of 10 characters per server. You will want to share resources with your other characters on the server and not run up against the limit. Additionally, people typically have one or more "mule" characters on each server, just to hold extra items that won't fit in your inventory or the bank. For example, you might want to dedicate a mule to collecting different cloths which you will naturally get from battling monsters in case one of your other characters takes up Tailoring in the future. Or metals for Blacksmiths, hard to get quest items, etc. Save this stuff, because chances are you will want it later, even if you have no use for it now.

    As far as RP servers, they tend to be pretty mild in WoW, it's rarely hardcore roleplaying, and the people tend to be a bit nicer and more mature on those servers (in general) IMO, so I spend most of my time on a PvE-RP server. As to which server you choose within a certain type, it does not make a lot of difference, some have higher populations but that can change over time. Higher population on a server means more opportunities to group with people, and a larger pool of available items at the auction house, but conversely it also means greater competition for resources and quest items, and more competition at the auction house.

    As far as making money early, take Skinning or Herbalism and you will have plenty of cash (you need close to 100 gold to buy a mount at level 40). Later on, Alchemy can make a good deal of money as well with high-end potions and transmuting. But, I would try different professions with different characters, they can all be fun. Certain professions go better with certain others, or with certain classes. For example, Taurens get +15 to Herbalism skill. Dwarves can spot ore deposits on their map. Skinning is good for leatherworkers because they need it for raw materials anyway. Likewise with Mining for Blacksmiths, and Herbalism for Alchemists. Tailoring can be good for caster classes because you can often wear things you make yourself.

    Auction almost everything of any value if you can, you will almost always get more for it than selling it to a vendor, sometimes much, much more. Playing the auction house can be a game of itself, but time spent studying the prices and auction patterns will usually pay off for you. You have to know when and what to auction, and how much to ask for things, and likewise for purchasing items. It adds up over time. Be very careful about spending a lot of money on items at the AH, chances are you will find good ones out in the field whilst questing.

    Try to move around to different areas for different characters to break up the tedium. Just because your mage went through the Redridge Mountains on her way to the top doesn't mean your warrior needs to, perhaps they might like to try Ashenvale instead, or in addition. A lot of zones overlap in quest levels, and at times you will get fruastrated and hit walls. That's usually a good time to switch zones for a bit, you can always come back later. Switching between different characters can also break up the tedium and give you fresh energy.

    As for game settings, make sure you play around with your video settings early on. Find settings that give you a decent frame rate while looking the best it can (you can see your framerate by typing Control-r). Anything above 15 fps is probably ok, although ideally you want to be over 30 fps, and the video settings can make a large difference. Try dropping down the terrain detail and environment distance settings to gain speed. Also the Full Screen Glow and Death Effect effects tend to slow the game down a lot on many systems, and generally don't add much, so you might try turning those off.

    The best WoW resource is probably Thottbot, I usually have this open in my browser in the background and refer to it constantly. It can be a tremendous help for all kinds of things, such as solutions to quests, prices items sell for, what spells are available at what level, finding quests and zones for a certain level, patterns and recipes for trade goods, talent tree calculators, etc. Additionally the official WoW forums on Blizzard's site have a lot of useful information in them from other players if you can filter out the many thousands of posts (the search system on those boards kind of sucks, though).

    Finally, don't be afraid to try one of the many addons available for WoW. These plugins can make your life a lot easier (although you need to try to keep them up to date with the latest WoW version). They can be interface enhancements giving you more flexible button arrangements, or giving map coordinates to more easily locate quest goals, or tell you the vendor price and average auction price of any item from anywhere in the world, give easy one-button methods for "buffing" (casting beneficial spells onto) a whole party, give aggregate combat statistics, and all kinds of other things. You install them by simply dropping them into your WoW/Interface/Addons folder and restarting the game. Some that I like are Auctioneer, BuffAhoy, flagRSP, Gatherer, MapLoc, and Recap. You can find addons at World Of War.net, Curse Gaming, and other places. I would probably suggest waiting until you've got the basics down before starting with addons though, you won't need them as much at first and it's best to keep it uncomplicated until you know what you're doing (although map location addons can be very handy right away, often called "Cosmos coords" on Thottbot).
     
  10. cluthz macrumors 68040

    cluthz

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    Norway
    #10
    I've played Wow since the beta and enjoy it a lot :D

    The most important in Wow is to get a good guild, with nice ppl you can play with.

    In the start, don't spend much money on equipment, it's not worth it.
    With effective playing you can get a to lvl 30 in like 2-3 days, so don't buy much equipment, use quest rewards and what you find.
    20% of the content in Wow is before you get 60, the rest is lvl 60 content.

    Learn what stats you need! The only stat all classes need is stamina, casters need int, rogues and hunters need agi, warriors need strength etc..
    When you choose your class post back here and i'll sure you get a lot of tips on how to play it.

    Find out how aggro works!! This is how Wow is built up, why do a mob attack you instead of the warrior? Or why do the mob attack your priest friend when you play a warrior that can take 10x more damage?

    And most important of all, don't let the players you play with down, your reputation is everything, if you are nice and play good players wanna play more with you!

    Also, choose a server with balanced horde/alliance ratio. It's not fun to be alliance on a server with 30% horde and 70% alliance, since you'll wait ages to get into battlegrounds.

    And ask more experienced players for tips and tricks.
    I've got a lvl 60 NE hunter, 60 NE warrior, 36 NE Druid, 24 Tauren Warrior, 18 Human rogue, 17 Tauren Shaman :D
     
  11. AoWolf macrumors 6502a

    AoWolf

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Location:
    Daytona Beach
    #11
    Ill make this short and to the point:

    Play PvP you will not regret it.

    Find a class/race you like and stick with it.

    Thottbot is your friend.

    Be wary of people with full epics we tend to be jerks and want little to do with you.
     
  12. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    New Zealand
    #12
    That's what you say now... ;)
     
  13. Josh macrumors 68000

    Josh

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    State College, PA
    #13
    my best advice is to pick a profession and work on it A LOT early on.

    I didn't learn professions until like level 20 on my dwarf hunter, and it sucked because I couldn't use the stuff I was making.

    But now, on my new Tauren (level 9), I started with skinning+leather working right away, and I can use all of the stuff I make, and not only is it way better than stuff I can afford to buy, and better than what most others of a similar level have, I can sell it for good cash too.

    <-- Fornin level 29 Dwarf Hunter on Shattered Hand
    <-- Qianka level 9 Tauren Shaman on Spirestone
     
  14. cluthz macrumors 68040

    cluthz

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2004
    Location:
    Norway
    #14
    On servers today there are mostly high lvl and crafting mats (skins/bars/herbs) sells quite high compared to gear on AH. Keeping up on lvl'ing you tradeskill will cost much more tahn buying gear. I'd rather spend time lvling and skin/mine and sell the mats instead. Back when wow was new ligth leather and copper bars sold for a few silver, now they are like 50+ silvers a stack, not worth it imho, since you'll get good green items for the same price as a stack of copper bars.
     
  15. Josh macrumors 68000

    Josh

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    Mar 4, 2004
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    #15
    True, but generally at low levels, gathering professions will be much better than crafting. Low levels can't disenchant high-level items (because they cant get them or afford them). Where as it flips around level 40, were gathering is a waste of time, and crafting high-level things will get you money.

    For a low level, like my current level 9, I can gather skins easy - nearly everything I kill is skinable. With this leather, I can create gear that is well beyond the gear a level 9 typically has. Gear of equal quality costs much more than a level 9 has to spend.

    However, since it is so easy to gather leather and create gear, I can spare to sell high quality gear at a price similar levels can afford (2-3 silver), and make (in comparison to my level) a killing.

    Plus, me and my same-level buddies are always equipped with really good gear that I make since I'm making it all the time. The old gear can be sold for good dough once it's swapped out.

    Usually, low levels should gather (skinning, herbalism, mining, etc) and sell their stuff to higher levels, who craft (enchanting, blacksmithing, engineering, etc). The higher levels then sell their stuff to high levels.

    Skinning+leatherworking is what I find to be the exception, as I produce items that are very useful to low levels, while building my skill and making money. Enchanting, for example, at levels below 40 is worthless, as you would only be able to get your skill up so high before your level becomes a cap, and you won't be able to obtain mats you need to progress your skill.
     
  16. Fezwick macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    #16
    If you do PvP, let me say, do battlegrounds as much as you can. Start as early as possible and get as much honor as you can. The items you can get from having a high PvP rank are crazy. I started doing battlegrounds at level 40, and I'm kicking myself now.

    Serjin, level 43 Troll Shaman on Lightninghoof.
     
  17. HiRez macrumors 603

    HiRez

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    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Western US
    #17
    I've tried a lot of different professions and I've found Herbalism to be the easiest moneymaker. At low levels you will find a lot of Swiftthistle, which always sells for really good money to high-level rogues for making Thistle Tea. Plus the patches you get it from (Mageroyal & Briarthorn) also sell pretty well, as does Stranglekelp. Most of the midlevel herbs sell easily and for good money (Kingsblood, Purple Lotus, Goldthorn, Sungrass). At the high levels you find a bunch of herbs that sell for a gold or more each, such as Ghost Mushrooms, Gromsblood, and Wintersbite. If you have Alchemy as well, you can make even more money off potions. For example, a stack of 5 Elixirs of Superior Defense sell for around 14-15 gold on my server. And purchasing Arcane Crystals and transmuting them into Arcanite Bars gives you an almost automatic 5-10 gold profit every two days with a minimum of effort (a couple minutes). One thing I will say is that being a Tauren Druid gives you a huge advantage for Herbalism (+15 racial to skill lets you gather herbs sooner and delay buying the advanced books, plus stealthing and aquatic form help a lot with gathering). My Herbalism/Alchemy Tauren Druid had about 350 gold saved up by level 40 just from that (I was pretty aggressive in maxxing the training though, and did put time into it).
     
  18. phill1234 macrumors member

    phill1234

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    Feb 21, 2006
    #18

    I played for almost a year ... and i just quit today. Its REALLY FUN at the begining ... but once you reach level 60 (level cap) you have to wait 2-3 hours to do an instance (dungeon) or go to a battleground (pvp). So my advice is ... dont even bother starting to play this game.

    I got a level 60 hunter and 43 warrior on skywall server.
     
  19. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2003
    Location:
    Planet Zebes
    #19
    So you bought this game, spent a years worth of $ on a subscription, and played it for a year.........
    but you would recommend others to not even bother starting to play this game?
    You played it for almost a year. That's a long time to play a game. So it must be worth it.
     
  20. MacsomJRR macrumors 6502a

    MacsomJRR

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    #20
    oooooooooooooooooo pwned
     
  21. phill1234 macrumors member

    phill1234

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    #21
    My point is... dont make a mistake like me wasting so much time on a game thats boring as hell in the end..
     
  22. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #22
    Stick with a good soloing class, like Hunter. Orcs make great hunters.

    Don't bother with "real" professions. Go herbalism and skinning. Herbs fetch good money on the Auction House. Skins, don't quite fare as well, but heck, might as well make the cash on them.
     
  23. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

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    #23
    What else can you do with herbalism besides sell the herbs? I have chosen that as my first profession and have accumulated some herbs but am not sure what all I can do with them. I'm a Night Elf Priest by the way.
     
  24. shortyjj macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    #24
    An introvert will ultimately be disappointed with this game. I've got 2 60s, one decked out in epix, but I still prefer playing the 52 b/c I'm not that interested in big raids and the guild social aspect, which at this point is the only thing to do end-game (my 52 has fun running 5-man pickup groups, but they're getting to be harder to find)
     
  25. HiRez macrumors 603

    HiRez

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    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Western US
    #25
    Mostly alchemists use herbs to make potions. A few are used in other professions (tailoring, leatherworking, etc.) but they're mostly for alchemy. It's not a terrible profession for a priest, you can make your own health and mana potions, +intellect, +fire, +frost, +shadow, +spell damage, +healing, etc. Plus stuff to help you with quests like invisibility and underwater breathing, and at high levels you can make money transmuting metals and elements.
     

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