Would you eat Quorn?

Discussion in 'Community' started by Durandal7, Aug 17, 2002.

  1. Durandal7 macrumors 68040

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    #1
  2. Beej macrumors 68020

    Beej

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    #2
    Heh... next thing they'll be recalling nuts because they can have the same effect on some people...
     
  3. awrc macrumors regular

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    #3
    Is Quorn a new introduction to the US or something? When I left the UK in 1994, you could buy Quorn in pretty much any big supermarket. It had been on the market for a while and there'd been no calls to ban it.

    And I'd add that this was before Mad Cow got really big, so it wasn't as if there was some sort of desperate search for an alternative to beef at the time :D
     
  4. zarathustra macrumors 6502a

    zarathustra

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    #4
    I have had Quorn on many occasions, and as a previous poster said, it has been available for a long time. Trust me, it's not any worse than feasting on the muscle tissue of animals who are injected with hormones and God knows what else while they stand in their own fecies.
     
  5. alex_ant macrumors 68020

    alex_ant

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    #5

    Silence! How dare you try to make Macrumors' resident fatasses feel guilty about what they eat. You should be ashamed.
     
  6. jelloshotsrule macrumors G3

    jelloshotsrule

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    #6
    never heard of it. but the more meat alternatives there are, the better.
     
  7. awrc macrumors regular

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    #7
    I just have a problem with the idea of "meat alternatives" generally, especially when a lot of effort is put into making it look and/or taste like meat. If you want to eat meat, eat meat. If you don't want to eat meat, don't. Being vegetarian but eating fake meat is just weird - I'd have thought that if someone found the idea of eating dead animals unpleasant, they wouldn't want their non-animal protein to look and taste like it.

    It's like someone giving up cannibalism but requiring that every time they have meatloaf, it's cooked in the shape of a foot.

    I'm not vegetarian, but I try to limit the amount of meat in my diet to maybe one meal a week (a big juicy steak on a good week, Hamburget Helper with lean meat on a bad one). The rest of the time my diet is primarily vegetarian - if it wasn't for the objections of my wife, I could live entirely on the Gourmet Veggie Sub from the local Jimmy John's pretty much indefinitely.
     
  8. eyelikeart Moderator emeritus

    eyelikeart

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    #8
    I'll try anything pretty much...unless it's something really nasty....like raw squirrel or something...he he he :D

    esp. if there are health benefits to it...most people are turned off to something that sounds funny if it's healthy...not me...quite the opposite ;)
     
  9. zarathustra macrumors 6502a

    zarathustra

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    #9
    You sir, are funny.:cool:
     
  10. ShaolinMiddleFinger macrumors 6502a

    ShaolinMiddleFinger

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    #10
    I agree with AWRC. If you want to eat meat, eat me.

    What's the deal of trying to eat something that looks like something else.

    I eat meat everyday. It hasn't bothered me none.
     
  11. vniow macrumors G4

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    #11
    How do you prefer to be cooked, medium or well-done?
     
  12. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #12
    edvniow,

    A little slow on the offer today, aren't you?
     
  13. vniow macrumors G4

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    #13
    I'm multitasking: tabbed browsing, cleaning room, cooking lunch, screwing around with my out of tune guitar, it's tough staying on time. :D
     
  14. Kashchei macrumors 65816

    Kashchei

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    #14
    When I was a grad student living in England (and money was very much an issue), I ate Quorn regularly and it was wonderful. I don't know that I would have tried it the first time had I known what it was made of, but having taken the leap I can say that it is the best meat-substitute I have ever eaten.
     
  15. Durandal7 thread starter macrumors 68040

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    #15
    Yea, it's new to the U.S. Some gruops over here are claiming it causes problems with your digestive tract. I would be willing to try it but I haven't seen it this far into the country yet.
     
  16. topicolo macrumors 68000

    topicolo

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    #16
    Fungus? bah. Mushrooms are fungi and people eat them all the time. I'd try it. I've had seaweed and snakemeat and they didn't taste all that bad. Quorn can't be much worse.
     
  17. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #17
    Quorn, introduced in Britain in 1985, arrived in U.S. supermarkets in January. Its popularity in Europe now rivals that of soyburgers and other meat substitutes.

    Never heard of it myself, but it seems europe has had it for almost 2 decades, come on, this is ridiculous. If it makes you sick don't eat it, but if its acceptable to your GI tract, why make a fuss?

    I love meat alternatives now and again - a good portobella mushroom on the grill is great. But there wasn't enough info on the fungus that makes up Quorn - it might not be mushroom, but some thing else you could grow in a vat.

    Anyone know the how its made?

    D
     
  18. awrc macrumors regular

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    #18
    Oh, sort of like Olestra, you mean. Its side effects are more than just claims, but nobody's managed to ban it yet, probably because the diet and potato chip industries can afford more lobbyists than the anti-Olestra activists.

    I wonder who's *really* behind the Quorn fuss, the meat industry or the more rabid vegetarians who object to even the idea of meat substitutes? Fungal rights activists, perhaps?

    Then there's Sorbitol, for that matter. I *love* sugar-free mints containing Sorbitol, but if I eat more than just one or two, I deeply regret it. I know there are anti-Sorbitol websites out there, but I don't recall seeing any concerted action to ban it. Again, probably because the "sugar-free" aspect means its got some big names and big bucks behind it.
     
  19. awrc macrumors regular

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    #19
    From people, of course :D

    See www.quorn.com for the grisly truth.

    Actually, the web site doesn't get any more specific than "mycoprotein", which I suspect means it's generic goop grown in big vats.

    Al
     
  20. Royal Pineapple macrumors 65816

    Royal Pineapple

    #20
    if we arnt suposed to eat the animals, than why are they made of meat?

    sorry i had to:D
     
  21. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    #21
    I would take a tiny bite from it, and then if I liked how it tasted I would take a larger bite :D
     
  22. whfsdude macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    Speaking of screwing around.......


    Hehe that made my day, now back to Billy Corgan & reading the boards.


    PS. The Help viewer sucks in os x when will I every get a break and I was almost done with carracho help x :-(
     
  23. whfsdude macrumors 6502a

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    One more thing best Corgan song =) Billy's Gravity Demos - Depresso
     
  24. Durandal7 thread starter macrumors 68040

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    Well, the website said that parts of Quorn are mushroom (8%-87% depending on dish) but it doesn't say what the rest is.
     
  25. awrc macrumors regular

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    #25
    The websites differ depending on country. The UK website's so evasive about what's in Quorn you'd think it really was something like Soylent Green, but the US site page here basically says it's an edible fungus. Well, technically they say it's a plant, but plant != fungus, so they're hedging around the truth, since I'm pretty sure the "myco" in "mycoprotein" means it's fungus. I suppose it's easier to say it's a teeny tiny little plant than a kind of mold found in dirt. So a mushroom is roughly right, although again calling it a mushroom is more public relations, since the actual stuff's probably got more in common with what you find growing on cheese if you leave it too long. According to the US site it's made in in huge fermenters then harvested. Again, Soylent Green comes to mind.

    Interestingly, they make a bit of a fuss on the US site about Quorn not being genetically modified - someone in marketing screwed up there I think, since the UK's aversion to GM crops doesn't exist to anything like the same extent in the US.

    Now that I think about it, I think my ex-wife and I did try Quorn once before I left the UK. Well, I did anyway, my ex-wife was allergic to mushrooms if I'm remembering correctly. Tasted like chicken. No, really. However, it was supposed to, since it was Quorn chicken pieces. Thoroughly unmemorable.
     

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