Your America

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Rebel, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Rebel macrumors newbie

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    #1
    Chances are your America and our politicians America are not the same place. If you are dead center on the earning scale in real-world twenty-first-century America , you make a bit less than $32,000 a year, and $32,000 is not a sum that our politicians have ever associated with “getting by” in this world.

    Politicians have never had a job the way you have a job*, where not showing up one morning gets you fired, costing you your health benefits. Politicians may find it difficult to relate personally to any of the nearly two million citizens who have recently lost their jobs, or the nearly 12 million who are still out of work. Politicians have never had to worry that they could not afford the best available health care and education for their children.

    For them, forty-three million people without health insurance may be no more than a politically inconvenient abstraction. When politicians talk about the economy, they are not talking about your economy. Their economy is filled with rich pals who fly around in their own airplanes. In politician’s economy and world, their friends relocate their companies offshore to avoid paying taxes. Taxes are for chumps like you. You are not a friend. You're the help. When the party our politicians are hosting ends, you'll be left cleaning up the house.

    Of the People, By the People, For the People - What today's politician keeps forgetting.

    United Citizens of America
     
  2. mischief macrumors 68030

    mischief

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    #3
    Agreed.

    Most of them seem to have lost touch with just what a "Public Servant" really is.
     
  3. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #4
    Rebel - your continued discourse on this forum is welcome, but you've been warned in the past about spamming with that link. Final warning.
     
  4. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #5
    Enlighten me, please, Rower. What makes that link any more spam-like than anyone else's signature?
     
  5. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #6
    Placement in the body text as opposed to the signature area - it's like an advertisement in a banner ad as opposed to in the text of the web page; you ignore certain areas of the page.

    Rebel is welcome to add it to his signature, but we had issues with him before apparently posting solely to promote that site/organization under the pretext of discussing the thread topic.
     
  6. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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  7. Rebel thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #8

    I'll behave........
     
  8. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #10
    If the thesis of Rebel's article is correct, Dubya is closer to The People than is Senator Kerry. :D

    Anyhow, I've always said that nobody in Congress should evade some two weeks a year of going incognito around their district or state. Casual clothes, shop at the discount stores, hang out in a corner bar, listen to the CB when on the highway. Heck, make it a month of manual labor on a farm or building houses. And live on what they earn.

    Well, no, that last wouldn't work. They might get an appreciation of what the world of minimum wage is like, though...

    :), 'Rat
     
  9. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #11
    Final Warning indeed.

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    ridiculously offtopic but it's nearly 2 AM and i stumbled across the picture ;)
     
  10. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #12
    Ha - don't think we're quite that hardcore, but the sentiment is about right sometimes. ;)
     
  11. kuyu macrumors 6502a

    kuyu

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    #13
    Well put, Rebel. There is definately some distance between "our" America and "theirs". In the end it's a matter of method. Republican's believe your struggle is your own. Democrats believe your struggle is everyone else's problem.

    You know, neither stance really seems to alieviate the problems/issues. Both have their merits, mind you, but neither is perfect.

    As for politicians, Ben Franklin was a great politician. He didn't believe that politicians should be paid for their duty. He donated all of his paychecks from politics to Boston and Philidelphia with the condition that they allow interest to acrue for 100 years. Both cities let the money sit for 200 years. His $1000 or so dollars became millions!!! That's patriotism. :)
     
  12. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #14
    He obviously shared Einstein's view of compound interest. ;)
     
  13. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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  14. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #16
    The increase in net worth during the tenure in office for the career-type politician is truly wondrous. Amazing how much of their salaries they can successfully invest! :D

    Not many do like JD Watts of Oklahoma, leaving the House of Representatives after doing his duty as he saw it, and then returning home.

    Or, do like "Mr. Sam", Sam Rayburn. He was once the most powerful politician in the U.S. (FDR era), but retired to a simple home in east Texas and lived quietly. When he died, his estate was some $17,000.

    Dunno how factual it is, but I've read that if Kerry is elected, he will be one of the wealthiest to ever achieve the presidency.

    'Rat
     
  15. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #17
    Probably only if you include his wife's fortune. As I suspect any divorce court in the nation will tell you, this is her money, not his.
     
  16. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #18
    And didn't she get that fortune from a Republican? She wasn't a Heinz at birth...
     
  17. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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  18. Rebel thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #20
    I have a question for this discussion flow.

    How many of you would support an "ordinary citizen" who decided to run for President of our nation?

    I am talking about a polished business professional who understands large budgets, capital expenditures, civilian politics, human resource needs, business accountability, and managing diverse work groups. - But they have no military background, or foreign political experience.

    I am not talking about Arnold or any other celebrity. This is just an ordinary guy who worked his way up the corporate ladder, and lived his life like most of the rest of us. Commutes to work (hours each day), lives in suburbia America, has a beautiful homemaker wife (who is not interested in politics), a couple of kids, and has no skeletons in the closet.

    I am interested in your thoughts.
     
  19. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #21

    hard to say... it depends on the person...many former business professionals are screwing politics up since a few years in austria..

    many many how once gotten into upper management have completly lost any connection with reality

    fitting quote:

    "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."
    Lord Acton, 1887

    i think in todays growing globalization / interconnection etc. diplomacy is more important then ever before

    about military career: unimportant but i prefer a president without
     
  20. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #22
    And again, that ranking seems to take his wife's money into account. According to the referenced Forbes list, the richest American president of all time is (adjusting for inflation), George Washington!

    Where is FDR on that list, I wonder? I thought his family was loaded.
     
  21. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #23
    Rebel, for me it would depend on the guy's ideas about political philosophy, and maybe more important, the "workability" of his ideas if they were notably different from the general mainstream.

    For instance, I like many of the libertarian ideas, but I don't think a libertarian administration could be successful. Were there more of a grassroots buildup of libertarianism over time, it might well be different.

    It's taken some 70 years for us to develop into today's Nanny State--but not everything we're doing at the federal level is bad.

    'Rat
     
  22. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #24
    I (perhaps somewhat sadly) would not be apt to support such an individual for the Office of President. I would enjoy someone like you describe as a VP or a Senator, however...My reservations stem (again sadly) from the ability of said individual to "play the game"...if he/she was not skilled enough at the negotiating the political landscape, they would be ineffective, regardless of intentions.

    If this "regular" individual was able to adapt to the system, there is a good chance that they will change to such a degree that they become exactly like the career politicos that are so detached from general realities...such is life.

    My reply depresses me...
     
  23. Rebel thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #25
    Your reply depresses me also.

    Personally, I believe that our political offices (at all levels), have lost touch with what is important for a nation to survive.

    A nation’s most valuable resource is its children. If the children are not taken care of, the nation will eventually fail. Take a good look at our youth and at our failing educational systems. Our future as a nation is in terrible jeopardy, and it is directly related to politicians who have lost touch.

    George Washington warned our nation not to get caught-up in specific political parties. From a non-partisan standpoint, both main political groups (elephants and donkeys), have some good views and some not so good. You can also add the libertarians to the mix.

    I believe that the executive branch of our federal government needs to have non-partisan leadership. Folks who can take in all sides and collaborate direction that is best for our nation’s future. These leaders will have to have business savvy (unlike lawyers). Political parties, who place party agendas first, should never be allowed to hold our nations highest office.

    Our nation is not yet ready to follow this view because our nation’s recent success during the Clinton years is still fresh. People are not angry or scared enough yet. Our nation is years away from economic recovery. Kerry doesn't have a plan, and Bush doesn't have a clue. Our nation may be ready to follow this view in the 2008 elections, and if not, then definitely in the 2012.

    And I know who can pull it off. But the timing will have to be perfect.
     

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