£5 Product - Simple Mutli-track Recording Device

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by LERsince1991, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. LERsince1991 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #1
    Ok so I wanted to record some things on garageband and adobe soundbooth but the Macbook only has one Line-in and one Line-Out. I thought about it for a bit and decided what I would do.

    I ended up cutting some wires and sticking some together to create a circuit that allowed this to happen. It's really simple, basically get your 2 input instruments (mono devices such as guitar or microphone) and join the 2 mono signals into one stereo signal. This plugs into the standard line-in and preserves the 2 signals. Go into garageband or soundbooth (or whatever you use) and select 2 tracks, One recording from mono line 1 and the other recording from mono line 2. (from the stereo line in).

    There you have it, yes you are relying on the onboard pre-amps and stuff but for most people it just works like that, simple and good enough for quite a few people including me.

    I was thinking about making a little very basic product out of the idea. pretty much just an adapter. 2 mono inputs 1/4" jacks and one stereo output 1/8" jack. Put it in a neat little box and there you have it.
     

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  2. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #2
    Great idea but you can buy these pre-made for about $6 or $7 and any of the large chain music stores. Hosa, Monster and others make many version of this idea with just about any kind of end you might need.
     
  3. LERsince1991 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
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    UK
    #3
    Ah cool, I did a search on the internet but I couldn't find and adapters or cables that offered 2x 1/4" mono jacks (female) into 1x 1/8" stereo jack (male)

    Anyone have a link? Also I believe apple should make an adapter and sell it in their store, I bet they would sell a few.
     
  4. netdog macrumors 603

    netdog

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #4
    These solutions really sound pretty crappy for electric guitars unless you are just going to remove the natural tone of the instrument for on-board processing.
     
  5. LERsince1991 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Jul 24, 2008
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    UK
    #5
    I haven't tried it with an electric guitar but I'll have a go this afternoon. I used an acoustic guitar naturally and it sounded alright. I suppose they would be better if your using onboard processing effects.
     
  6. Dr Sound macrumors member

    Dr Sound

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  7. LERsince1991 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    Guess so :p Thats what I'm talking about.

    Made my own now anyway cos I couldn't find the cable anywhere in the UK!

    I could have done a much better job but don't have the equipment at home.

    Has some thick white Italian leather on the base to stop it from slipping and scratching. Had some left over from another project so why not, even if it is the finest leather in the world, made for designer sofas :p
     

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  8. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #8

    I have a box of misc. cables and adaptors I've collected. One neat one is a slpitter cable to takes 3.5mm TRS (aka "mini stereo") and splits it into a left and right male RCA. Then I have a few RCA to 1/4 inch and RCA to 3.5mm plugs. So I can stick on whatever I need.

    Actually Apple does sell something like this but the price is about 8X higher then I paid at the local music store

    http://store.apple.com/us/product/M9573LL/A?fnode=MTY1NDA3Ng&mco=MjE0OTQ3OQ

    The other trick I'll do is find cables with the corect ends then cut them in half and solder then back together but with the ends swapped around the way I need them. I did this recently so I could connect my Korg metronome into my audio mixer stereo. Some solder and heat shrink tube and I had a custom 3.5mm TS to XLR cable. Heat shrink tubing is the key to a profesional looking job. I find it cheaper and easier to cut a cable in half then to buy bulk wire and the connectors
     

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