16 Dead, 421 Sickened in San Diego Hepatitis A Outbreak

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #1
    https://timesofsandiego.com/life/20...hepatitis-outbreak-421-sickened-latest-stats/
    dang, hope this gets controlled quick.
     
  2. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #2
    Who needs national healthcare?

    I'm healthy.

    So what do I have to worry about?
     
  3. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #3
    why are CA democrats still sitting on their butts concerning single payer?
     
  4. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #4
    Are you an IV drug user?
     
  5. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #5
    :rolleyes:

    No. But I have been known to use streets and sidewalks on occasion.
     
  6. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #6
    barefoot?
     
  7. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #7
    This is a hepatitis outbreak among the homeless population in San Diego.

    Homelessness is an increasing social and public health problem worldwide. According to the United Nations, “absolute homelessness” describes the conditions of persons without physical shelter. “Relative homelessness” describes the condition of those who have a physical shelter but one that does not meet basic standards of health and safety, such as and access to safe water and sanitation, personal safety, and protection from the elements (1). An estimated 100 million persons worldwide experience either absolute or relative homelessness (2). Homelessness is associated with numerous behavioral, social, and environmental risks that expose persons to many communicable infections, which may spread among the homeless and lead to outbreaks that can become serious public health concerns (38). Epidemiologic studies of homeless populations have reported the following prevalence rates for infectious diseases: 6.2%–35% for HIV infection (6,913), 17%30% for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (9,10), 12%30% for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (9,10), 1.2%–6.8% for active tuberculosis (TB) (3,4), 3.8%–56% for scabies (11,12), 7%–22% for body louse infestation (5,11,13,14), and 2%–30% for Bartonella quintanainfection (5,15), which is the most common louse-borne disease in urban homeless.

    The prevalence of these transmissible diseases among the homeless varies greatly according to living conditions. Homeless persons who sleep outdoors in vehicles, abandoned buildings, or other places not intended for human habitation are mainly street youth, female street sex workers, and persons with mental health problems (1). These persons are frequently injection drug users (IDUs), and they often engage in risky sexual behavior, which exposes them to both blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections such as HIV, HCV, and HBV (6,9,10). Homeless persons sleeping in shelters are mainly single men, but they also include single women, families with children, and mentally ill persons (1). The primary health concerns for this population are the overcrowded living conditions that expose them to airborne infections, especially TB (7), and the lack of personal hygiene and clothing changes that expose them to scabies, infestation with body lice, and louse-borne diseases (5). Homeless persons using single-room hotels or living with friends and family show a high prevalence of illicit drug use and risky sexual behavior that increases the risk for infections transmitted by blood and/or sex (6), and they also frequently live in overcrowded conditions that expose them to TB (7).

    Homeless people face many barriers to accessing healthcare systems; these factors contribute to increasing the spread of infections (1). Implementing efficient strategies to survey and prevent the spread of communicable infections among the homeless is a public health priority. Strategies reported to be efficient for controlling or preventing communicable infections in the homeless are targeted interventions that focus on areas where homeless people are more likely to reside and are conducted with a mobile team that includes outreach workers (8,1619). In this review, which concentrates on the primary communicable infections commonly associated with homelessness, we summarize the main intervention measures reported to be efficient in controlling and preventing these infections.

    Link


    Its a difficult situation because out of the few people who you could actually help there are many who don't give a f**k, which is why they're in that position in the first place.
     
  8. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #8
    Do you walk on your hands or pick up food off the street?

    I'm also pretty sure these people have access to healthcare if they need it. Doesn't California have a state medical plan for low/no income persons?
     
  9. VulchR, Sep 19, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017

    VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #9
    Oh for heaven's sake, do you think it is a good thing that there is a pool of infectious diseases in human beings left untreated?

    EDIT: OK - the tone of this post was a little harsh... I just think there is always a risk of infectious diseases causing havoc because we've become complacent.
     
  10. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #10
    1. Those people need to seek treatment, no one is being left untreated.

    2. They've given out 7000 vaccinations to those "at-risk".

    I mean this isn't a case of anyone saying "Hey, there's 600 people on the street with Hep A, that's really unfortunate" all the while doing absolutely nothing about it.
     
  11. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #11
    The point is the hepatitis is there, evolving, so it does entail some risk, but I'm glad to learn that vaccinations are being given out. It just makes sense. Sorry about the tone of my previous post...
     
  12. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #12
    Yes it's there, yes it's tragic, yes we hope the outbreak gets contained. But 2nd post in and people can't help themselves with a senseless "Who needs national healthcare" when that would make no difference whatsoever. These people don't have to go without healthcare if they don't want to.

    BTW......No apology needed. ;)
     
  13. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #13
    Didn't Cali vote for UHC? Where is it?
     
  14. ActionableMango macrumors G3

    ActionableMango

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    Sep 21, 2010
    #14
    I don't understand how an outbreak from November last year is already killing people. I must be mistaken, but I thought this disease was largely asymptomatic and took decades to kill. Maybe I am confusing A, B, and C types.
     
  15. Zenithal macrumors G3

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    #15
    Do you understand single payer? It's based on taxes taken in. Homeless people don't pay tax because they have no sizeable income and no address to boot. This is an outbreak of HepA among the homeless population in California. I can't speak for all Californians, but I don't care about the homeless. There's plenty of opportunities to get off the street and get back to being a contributing member of society. Popping off in droves will hardly garner concern from me. I've made my contempt for homeless people who actively choose to not seek government and private help before. So my post shouldn't surprise anyone.

    The homeless who do not seek help are merely a burden on society.
     
  16. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Aug 5, 2010
    #16
    I'm not sure about the US, but I have come across restrooms that contained a receptacle for needle disposal. Drug users can be an issue, but apparently that was one way to help control the risk to others.
     
  17. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #17
    Some restrooms in the US have receptacles for needle disposal but they weren’t put there for IV drug users, they were put there for diabetics.
     
  18. DearthnVader macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #18
    Way to love thy neighbor.

    Oh, I forgot, these people have no home, so they can't be your neighbor.:rolleyes:

    Your post doesn't surprise me, it's the typical type of thing someone would say if they never lived a hard day in their life.
     

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17 September 19, 2017