16 GB of RAM and still huge page-ins

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by SBlue1, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. SBlue1 macrumors 65816

    SBlue1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    #1
    Hey. A quick question.

    I just upgraded my late 2012 MacBook Pro with 16 GB of Ram. I had 8 GB but work with lots of big apps like Photoshop and Indesign at the same time plus have a second account on the same Mac so I constantly had big page-in and page-out numbers as well as a high swap and the cursor was constantly turning into a beachball.

    Now since I have the new RAM the Mac is running like new and I never use more than 10 or 11 GB and the page-outs and swaps are down to 0. There are still a high number of page-ins though and the booting time seems not to have improved a lot. When I take a look at the numbers there are 200.000 page-ins just seconds after a fresh reboot, 600.000 page-ins after 30 minutes of simple surfing.

    Is this normal? If not how can I get rid of this?
     
  2. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

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    #2
    page ins -> stuff read from disk and cached in memory.

    don't sweat it.

    pageouts are evil tough.

    cheers
     
  3. cjmillsnun macrumors 68020

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    Aug 28, 2009
    #3
    It's normal.

    Boot times won't improve without an SSD.
     
  4. SBlue1 thread starter macrumors 65816

    SBlue1

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    Oct 17, 2008
  5. SkimMilk168 macrumors regular

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    Singapore
    #5
    I'd suggest that you upgrade to a SSD.
    Definitely will see improvements in boot up times, and swapping times will also be improved. Less beach balls. :D
     
  6. Natzoo macrumors 65816

    Natzoo

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    #6
    Get the SSD now! lol, but really you should get it.:D
     
  7. campyguy macrumors 68030

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    Portland / Seattle
    #7
    Get an external scratch disk for PS. Do it now.
     
  8. yjchua95 macrumors 604

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    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
  9. JHUFrank macrumors 6502a

    JHUFrank

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  10. Natzoo macrumors 65816

    Natzoo

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    #10
    hi i have 5 million page ins and 13 page outs. What do the page outs mean, i looked it up but kinda need to know how to stop it
     
  11. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

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    #11
    page outs is the VMM writing stuff that was in memory to the swap file.

    it is also normal, but means your system needed more memory than you have available. When you need to use what was in that memory it will need to read it back from disk, and probably swap other stuff out to make room for it.

    13 is nothing. i currently have a quarter of a million and that's also negligible.

    cheers
     
  12. T'hain Esh Kelch macrumors 601

    T'hain Esh Kelch

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    Denmark
    #12
    Get an SSD. I wonder why no one in this thread suggested it!
     
  13. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Oct 10, 2013
    #13
    Please post a screenshot of the activity monitor and describe the symptoms of the problems you are experiencing. Why are you looking at page-ins/outs?
     
  14. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

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    #14
    from the OP, there is no problem and the mac runs like brand new :D
     
  15. Natzoo macrumors 65816

    Natzoo

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    #15
    Me?
     
  16. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #16
    You will always have page-ins, or your Mac wouldn't be running. It is quite normal for you to have a growing number of page-ins as you use your Mac, run applications, load documents, etc., and it's also normal for all of your memory to be in use by OS X. It does not mean that you are running out of memory or that it is maxed out. OS X will manage all available memory, making it available to apps on an as-needed basis. Refer to the following Apple support article for more information on how to understand your Activity Monitor readings.
     
  17. zeppo2 macrumors member

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    Sep 4, 2010
    #17
    I've read this before on this forum, and I am not doubting it (I know nothing about this stuff.) But if this IS true, then how do you know when you ARE at the point where a memory upgrade will make a difference? What readings should you look for?

    Thanks,
    Zeppo
     
  18. Fishrrman macrumors G3

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    Feb 20, 2009
    #18
    You won't enjoy the potential speed the MBPro is capable of UNTIL you install an SSD.

    The installation is "screwdriver easy", so long as you have the RIGHT TOOLS (I think you'll need a Philips #00 and a TORX T-6, check to be sure).

    SSD prices are so reasonable now that there's really no excuse not to put one in.

    Do it, and you won't regret it.
     
  19. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Oct 10, 2013
    #19
    GGJstudios has already answered your question in great detail and with sources.
    What do you not understand?

    Also look here:
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1756865

    ----------

    My reply was directed at the OP, but it seems to apply to you, too.
     
  20. Cloudsurfer macrumors 65816

    Cloudsurfer

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    #20
    If Activity Monitor shows a Red graph, it's time to upgrade. If it shows a Green graph, you're fine. It's really not that difficult.
     
  21. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #21
    As stated in my earlier post, if the memory pressure graph shows red, it means RAM memory resources are depleted and OS X is using the drive for memory. That would indicate you don't have sufficient RAM. If that happens infrequently, it may not justify buying more RAM. If it happens regularly under your normal workload, more RAM would improve performance.
     
  22. zeppo2, Jan 28, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2015

    zeppo2 macrumors member

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    Sep 4, 2010
    #22
    I guess it's not worth trying to explain what I mean:

    "... it's also normal for all of your memory to be in use by OS X. It does not mean that you are running out of memory or that it is maxed out. OS X will manage all available memory, making it available to apps on an as-needed basis."

    I suppose I was just reading the above the wrong way. To me, it seemed to be saying that the monitor won't show green because the normal use by the OS X always ramps it up to the Orange range in some "maximizing" of resources, in which case, orange, the color of "caution", really isn't serving as any warning. So they might as well just make it Green and Red and skip the orange. That would make sense, reading it the way I was. I suppose I should have read with the sense of: "it is not abnormal for all of your memory to be in use by OS X."

    I really worded my question wrong and instead of writing" at the point where a memory upgrade will make a difference" should have said "at the point where memory is getting low?" Because by the way I understand it, OS X makes it look like all the memory is maxed because it sets it all aside for management processes, though in reality you might really not be nearing the brink of low memory resources because those "management processes" haven't actually had to use all the memory it has claimed or set aside to manage. As I said, I don't know about this, only what I have been able to piece together, but from what I've read, just because OS X is "managing" all the memory resources, doesn't mean all resources are being used. I guess that is wrong. But if you can't figure out what I mean by that, or conceive of a system of memory management like that, then I'm not explaining myself well enough and it will be take too difficult to do so in this thread, I'm afraid. But no biggy.
     
  23. SBlue1 thread starter macrumors 65816

    SBlue1

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    Oct 17, 2008
    #23
    Hey everybody, thank you for your posts. Everything is fine. :)

    My main problem was the low speed and frequent beach balling due to working with both Photoshop and Indesign at the same time. Switching between the two or just loading or editing a big file was a constant pain and killing the workflow. By checking the system status it turned out I was running out of ram since there were enormous values for swaps, page-ins and page-outs. Page-outs slow the system down since this means the Mac is temporarily copying a portion of the ram onto the hard drive every time it runs out of space.

    Now by upgrading the ram there are almost no slow downs. The page-ins and swaps are down to zero, just leaving some page-outs which made me worry that something was not right. Now since everybody said this is normal I won't worry. :)

    Now to improve the loading times of the apps I installed a new SSD a few days ago. Everything is so fast now. So thanks for your help guys.
     
  24. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #24
    I think you meant page-outs and swaps are down to zero. You will always have page-ins if your computer is running.
     
  25. SBlue1 thread starter macrumors 65816

    SBlue1

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