99° C When converting video - Normal?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by rocknblogger, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. rocknblogger macrumors 68020

    rocknblogger

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #1
    I'm not one to watch temps but I'm converting a 10GB MKV to AVI video and I noticed the fans kick in (which I know is normal) and decided to check the temps. All four cores were at 99°c. Is this normal for this type of operation? My Mac Pro or PC never get close to that so just I'm wondering about it.

    2013 rMBP
    i7 2.7GHz
    16GB'S RAM
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Yes, quite normal. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level.

    If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC.
    (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. dontpannic macrumors 6502

    dontpannic

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    May 16, 2011
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    Orpington, Kent, UK
    #3
    Mine sits around 96°C here when doing anything intensive (2011MBP)
     
  4. theBostonian Suspended

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  5. Inopia-Vi macrumors regular

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    #5
    On the same machine (MBP 2011), when the lid is open, the fans running and the laptop on a griffin elevator i get 82 degrees.

    However, this is when Handbrake is the only program open. Converting Blu-Ray to maximum quality. Takes 5 hours and the temperature goes between 79-85.
     
  6. rocknblogger thread starter macrumors 68020

    rocknblogger

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
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    #6
    I knew I'd get a concise answer from you. A lot more than I needed but it is appreciated ;)

    I thought that it was normal but I figured I'd ask anyway just to be sure. I just ran the same operation on my PC and the average core temps never went over 44ºC. I guess it pays to invest in cooling :D

    Thanks for the the helpful links too. I'll make sure to peruse as time permits:)

    ----------

    Yeah actually I'm a bit surprised at the length of time it's taking to convert this one movie. I'm used to 30 to 60 minutes for high quality conversions. Considering this machine has the i7 2.7GHz proc I expected it to be faster even if it is a laptop specific processor.
     
  7. maratus macrumors 6502a

    maratus

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    Jun 12, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #7
    Yes, it's common but of course not so normal. I had a thread about this issue before, everything was explained there. Long story short, even for this new 2.7Ghz chip with 6MB L3 cache you can't really do anything - it's simply too hot for rMBP cooling system.
     
  8. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #8
    Comparing desktop silicon to laptop silicon is apple to oranges (pun intended).

    Desktops aren't meant to push much past 60°C whereas mobile silicon is meant to withstand much higher temperatures as a cooling system cannot be as effective in so little space.
     
  9. rocknblogger, Apr 14, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013

    rocknblogger thread starter macrumors 68020

    rocknblogger

    Joined:
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    #9
    Trust me, I know that. I've been around computers well over 30 years. I was just commenting on how different the two platforms are. But taking heat out of the conversation, I was still surprised at the length of time it took to convert this video. This is supposed to be a pro level laptop and in my humble opinion, it falls a bit short. I'm now second guessing myself that maybe I should have gone with the cMBP 2.7GHz as it has 8MB L3 Cache. For these types of operations that processor would be faster though I don't know by how much.

    Don't get me wrong, I still love my rMBP. I expected a bit more punch.
     
  10. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    Dec 11, 2008
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    #10
    The standard MBP will be worse as the Retina has vastly improved cooling and it can be spec`d with a 2.8 with 8Mb of L3 cache, equally it wont be vastly faster in the same circumstance. Mac portables have always run notoriously hot, to date the Retina is the best portable Apple has produced for thermal management, my own 2.3 Retina will pump out 3GHz+ all day long without any in indication of throttling.
     
  11. rocknblogger thread starter macrumors 68020

    rocknblogger

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    Apr 2, 2011
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    #11
    I really wanted to get the 2.8GHz but it was way too much. It's okay, I don't have to use the rMBP for conversions. My PC or Mac Pro can handle that. For everything else I do the retina is more than capable.
     
  12. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #12
    Realistically unless you can moniterize the difference the 2.8 is simply not worth the additional price, and the potential for throttling ever increases. Those seeking serious performance, as you say should look to a desktop based solution.
     

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