A Bad Pill or Not

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Plutonius, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Plutonius macrumors 603

    Plutonius

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    #1
    It has been reported that New Hampshire is trying to pass a bill that allows women 18 years or older to purchase birth control pills without a prescription. The pills would only be released by pharmacy employees and would be behind the pharmacy counter (similar to Sudafed allergy medicine).

    I think it's a good idea.

    Do you agree or disagree with this change ?
     
  2. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #2
    As long as there is no real risk of abusing the pills which I don't think there is I don't see why they shouldn't be over the counter.
     
  3. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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    #3
    Oregon already has that. but sometimes they need to see a doctor to have things worked out.
     
  4. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #4
    I'm good with it.

    But I'd also like to see the "morning after pill" sold OTC behind the counter as well.
     
  5. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #5
    Isn't it already available without a prescription? Or is it on the shelf and you are wanting to make it more difficult to get by moving it behind the counter?
     
  6. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #6
    If the pill is currently covered by insurance would this move mean women would have to pay the full price without a prescription?
     
  7. ChrisWB macrumors 6502

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    #7
    I just checked my plan (Blue Cross), and you're correct.
     
  8. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #8
    Wait, is it?

    (honestly don't know. Thought is was still by prescription.)
     
  9. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #9
    I think it is, but I'm not 100% sure.
     
  10. ibookg409 Suspended

    ibookg409

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    #10
    What was the policy before? The same but with a script?

    Over 18 I think I'm fine with it, although I'd prefer if they were out of high school first. From a medical perspective I like the idea of having to get a script initially to make sure the pills won't harm you. I guess I really don't know how I feel. I've always been against things that alter our bodies natural functions chemically.
     
  11. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #11
    Plan B, or the "morning after pill" is available OTC.
     
  12. Septembersrain Contributor

    Septembersrain

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    #12
    I think it's a good idea for the most part. Only concern I'd have is if the person has a medical condition or other situation where birth control could do harm.

    I agree with above that the morning after pill needs to be available at more places. Say if a 24 hour pharmacy carried them and sold them at an affordable price, then you'd have access right after an oops moment.

    Now for the cost of birth control without insurance, there are some that I used to take when I didn't have insurance that were like $20 a month. Not too bad but I'm not sure how the pricing is now. They'd have to keep it low for it to be of benefit to the market who would need it (People without insurance, low income, etc).
     
  13. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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    #13
    Better not drink coffee eat sugar and quite a few other things.
     
  14. MaulRx Suspended

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    #14
    Oregon allows pharmacists to prescribe the pill if they are familiar with your medication history and after the completion of a small amount of CME. Pharmacists are under utilized in this country so I think it's a good model to follow in other states. As ubiquitous as the pill is it's still not safe for every woman so it's good to still have a bit of information in hand.

    Oregon is also one of the few states that allows ND's to prescribe narcotics if I remember correctly....
     
  15. ibookg409 Suspended

    ibookg409

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    #15
    Ugh.
     
  16. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    #16
    This is a great idea. I think either the pharmacist or a doctor should consult with them before hand though, or during the early days in taking it. The pill is wonderful. I genuinely don't know why, of even if, anyone can be against it. But it's powerful. There doesn't need to be an age limit on it either.

    Same with the morning after pill. Just make it readily available to literally anyone. Again - why not?

    If a woman wants to protect against pregnancy, regular her period, or any of the other effects of the contraceptive pill then they should have access to it and full control of their body.
    Ditto for the morning after pill. If they want to end a potential pregnancy then sure. Go for it! Have a mini consultation with the phramacist to explain what will happen (physically and emotionally) and boom.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 4, 2017 ---
    Is that a reaction from someone that knows they've been had and so cannot reply? It certainly looks like it. It's a genuine puzzle. You said you don't want things that alter your body, but literally everything does. I mean, I assume you only eat food that our teeth and digestive system have evolved to eat - fruits, no meat, etc? It's a pretty huge statement.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 4, 2017 ---
    Or take painkillers, need insulin, allergy medication, meats that contain tryptophan, eggs. Gosh you could write such a huge list, it's pretty funny.
     
  17. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #17
    As a clinical pharmacist I'm a bit leery of having birth control be dispensed OTC (or "OTC Control", meaning it's held behind the counter).

    Here's my justification:
    - Counseling as to how to take contraceptives is very important. Unlike other medications its very important that the contraceptives we're talking about here are taken on a specific schedule. Missing doses can cause the medication to fail. Understanding the cycle and resetting it is often a point of confusion. Counseling should absolutely take with these drugs, but knowing how large chain pharmacies operate, it's not going to happen, patients won't necessarily read the instructions, etc.
    - If pharmacists are going to be expected to counsel on these medications, make recommendations, etc, are pharmacists going to be reimbursed by insurance companies for this service? Probably not.
    - If contraceptives went OTC, insurance companies would likely stop covering them- thats usually how it works once drugs lose their prescription status. That would theoretically make contraceptives more expensive.
    - Reproductive health is an important topic, and should be part of a relationship fostered with a doctor. This won't happen with people jumping around from pharmacy to pharmacy. There is no structure for follow up to monitor how the patient is doing like you would have with a doctor visit.
    - Birth control is a safe medication, but let's not underestimate how dangerous it can be. There's blot clotting disorders associated with birth control. Getting a family history and analyzing other health conditions important in selecting the right medication.
    - There are many, many oral contraceptives on the market. I'm not sure how a patient would intuitively know which one to take and which one to switch to if they're having side effects.

    I'm all for access to birth control and understand the need for increased access. But I'm also more than anything for patients getting the best quality of care possible. I don't think dissolving doctors out of the picture for something as important as birth control is providing quality healthcare. If patients don't know how to use their medication and aren't supervised, the medication may not be effective. I honestly don't trust walking into your average CVS a patient would get the adequate time to be counseled by a pharmacist. I know how those places work, they're understaffed, overworked, and their bottom line is sales, not quality of service.
     
  18. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #18
    The more birth control and less unintended pregnancy the better. That said, it's a good idea as long as birth control is usually agreed to by the average non-religiously challenged doctor without any kind of extra legitimate medical screening required. Can they (the pill) be dangerous to the wrong medically incompatible person, at least any more so than the average over the counter drug?
    --- Post Merged, Feb 5, 2017 ---
    Some good points although I know of several drugs that are OTC, but still available through prescription. Usually the prescription gives the higher dosage and is significantly less expensive.
     
  19. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #19
    I'm not a doctor so I'll let them decide. If it's safe, sure.
     
  20. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #20
    This is how I feel.

    I'm all for easing up access to birth control, 100%!

    But while OCP's are generally safe, there are a few issues with prescribing them that leaves me to believe a physician should still be required.

    Smoking and combined OCP's (products with both an estrogen and progesterone ingredient) is generally not advised for women older than 35years of age due to an increased risk of blood clots. I can screen my patients for smoking before prescribing, but will women screen themselves reliably?

    Also, migraine with aura is becoming a contraindication for combined OCP's, due to an increased risk of stroke. Many women may not know that ahead of time.

    I do think things like the Depo Provera shot should not require a physician to prescribe however!
     
  21. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

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    #21
    Birth control pills have almost always been available in pharmacies throughout Europe without a prescription. Most of the girls I went to college with started their BC while studying abroad. It's certainly something a pharmacist can deal with.
     
  22. unlinked macrumors 6502a

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    #22
  23. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #23
    I had no idea you were a teetoller or didn't use any type of medication or nutritional supplement.
     
  24. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #24
    A pharmacist can manage getting BC into the hands of patients safely (probably better than most physicians can TBH).

    What a pharmacist can't do is follow-up on any issues that may arise related to the use of BC pills. Abnormal bleeding, blood clots, etc.
     
  25. shinji macrumors 65816

    shinji

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    #25
    Couldn't that just be left to a warning label?

    Might even be more effective because it reaches those patients who lie to their doctor about smoking and don't get the memo.
     

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