A few questions regarding my purchase of iMac and followup

Discussion in 'iMac' started by piatti, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. piatti macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #1
    I want to move the stuff in my old MacBook Pro to my new iMac. The question is, if I do that using Time Machine would Snow Leopard come over too? I first tried to do it via Mac to Mac over the WiFi but it would just load and load.

    The Best Buy guy said that I can't exchange the Magic Mouse with the trackpad because Magic Mouse came in the package. But aren't they supposed to give a choice in the first place?

    I was looking at some HP all-in-one. If I bought this one (i7) wouldn't it be faster than iMac? How does it compare with the iMac 27inch all in all? I'm afraid maybe I made the wrong choice...
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #2
    Mac OS X v10.6: How to use Migration Assistant to transfer files from another Mac
    No, you can selectively restore only user files, without copying system files.
    You can if you order one online from Apple:
    Not necessarily. There's more to performance than just processor speed. RAM, HDD/SSD, operating system and apps all play a role, as well.
     
  3. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #3
    If you see the specs the RAM is definitely better I think it's coming with 8 GB, not sure how to check for others. Could you go into that link if you don't mind and see how it compares with iMac?
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #4
    In my opinion it doesn't compare at all, since it's not running Mac OS X. No matter how good the hardware specs are, if I have to go back to Windows, it's not worth it.
     
  5. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #5
    What about Windows do you not like? Can't you run Hackintosh on it?
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #6
    Don't get me started! Too many things to list. There are hundreds of threads on Windows vs Mac OS X. Search and read a few of those to get an idea. Windows may be great for some people, but it's not for me. I gave it up about 4 years ago and my only regret is that I didn't switch to Mac sooner.
    I prefer not to violate software license agreements. Besides, it's so much simpler to buy a Mac, where the hardware and software were designed to work together, without "hacks".
     
  7. Kungshi macrumors member

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    #7
    As for myself, it's hard to just pinpoint one thing or two things. I can sum it up as this though: My overall user experience using OS X is easier, more enjoyable, and does not create stress and frustration. I say this because there have been many many mannnnny occasions while using windows where my experience was difficult, nothing close to enjoyable, and very stressful.

    I switched over from XP, and I know that microsoft and apple have stollen ideas from each other that has ultimately resulted in a better experience on both ends, BUT OS X to me is STILL the superior OS in terms of user experience.

    (As a side not, I run Windows 7 on my iMac, so I continue to use both operating systems with OS X being my primary about 95% of the time)
     
  8. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #8
    Seconding someone else's notion, you only get to choose your mouse when you order it through Apple; you can't replace an included accessory for another one.

    As for your HP all-in-one conundrum, I'm going to offer up two notions here.

    1: HP's machines suck. Period. Worst quality, worst included bloatware, worst offense of included bloatware, worst tech support, worst everything. Laptops, desktops, everything. I'm told that their business machines are better in this regard, and that's all well and good, but I get the feeling this is not exactly for business use and is more of a home machine, am I right?

    2. All-in-one machines suck. The only upshot to owning them is that you have a substantially reduced cable clutter. Otherwise, they're nowhere near as upgradable as their tower cousins, and they have nowhere near the room for things like a fast GPU, and the thermal envelope is way too small for what stuff they are actually able to fit inside, making them not very reliable (the iMac is probably the worst offender out of all of the all-in-ones out there). Not to mention, it's terrible bang for your buck.

    So by asking which machine is a better buy, the general answer is pretty much none of them, because HPs suck and because all-in-ones (especially) like the iMac are not reliable, and neither machine is a very good bang-for-your buck purchase.

    That being said, with the word "Hackintosh" being thrown around, I will affirm that, while it does require a certain degree of preparation, research, and (sometimes [your mileage will certainly vary based on how well you have researched and prepared]) headaches, you will always get a better bang for your buck than just about any desktop Apple makes, and it will be upgradable in ways that even the Mac Pro isn't and never will be.

    That said, Hackintoshing a laptop isn't anywhere near as feasible, and with the MacBook Pro being probably the best engineered laptop out there from a servicing/repair/reliability standpoint, I'll typically recommend it over all of Apple's other Macs if one doesn't want to go the Hackintoshing route.

    Windows is unparalleled in the corporate environment. For home users, while it is a matter of preference, Mac OS X tends to provide the least amount of headaches.

    It's not so much that the software and hardware was designed to work together as much as it is that the software is inherently capable of working on machines not made by Apple and branded as "Mac", Apple just locks it down so that it can't. Really all that separates the version of Mac OS X running on a Hackintosh from the version of Mac OS X running on an Apple-branded Mac is a different boot-loader, and extra drivers. If the machine is old enough, an alternate kernel is sometimes used, but as is the case with most recent Hackintoshes, this is becoming less and less frequent. As for the software license terms, they are inherently stupid and unjust, but even barring that, it's not like Apple can do anything to send the anti-piracy authorities after me for running Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware, especially if I own a MacBook Pro with the same version of Mac OS X that I legally paid for. Now if I start selling Hackintoshes, that's a whole 'nother story.

    Also, gonna dispel this myth right here and now; assuming you do enough research and follow directions correctly, it's not hard to set up and maintain (with regular OS X point releases such as 10.7.3) a Hackintosh these days. During the Tiger-on-Intel and Leopard days, it wasn't. At all. But that much has changed and it gets easier and better with each new major release of Mac OS X.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #9
    I used Windows for decades in corporate environments, and I wasn't impressed at all.
    You're entitled to your opinion, but it's just that: an opinion.
    I buy a Mac. I turn it on. I start using it.

    Let me know when your "hackintosh" gets easier than that. :rolleyes:
     
  10. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #10
    So what should I do then? Should I return the iMac and then buy a used Mac Pro Tower and a display? Would that be better bang for the buck? HP is touch screen so I thought that was cool. I'm guessing I should first buy a good bang for the buck PC tower and then make it a hackintosh by and by.
     
  11. Yebubbleman, Feb 4, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2012

    Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #11
    From an IT administrative perspective, Microsoft has more tools inherently built into the client version of Windows than Apple does into the server version of Mac OS X. Do I prefer Windows to Mac OS X, absolutely not, but there's a reason why it leads in terms of marketshare in those environments.

    I'm assuming you disagree here? For the sake of a friendly debate, what's fair about my software company telling me what I can or cannot do with the software I legally paid for provided I am not illegally distributing it?

    a 27" iMac starts at $1700. A similarly configured Hackintosh costs about half that. While I never said it was as easy or as fast as an Apple-branded Mac, you certainly don't have to expend $850 worth of your own effort to get the thing up and running. The OP asked about Hackintoshing from a bang-for-buck perspective. Given that and given what I've said here, the Hackintosh wins. Though again, if we're talking about buying an Apple-branded Mac, I wouldn't ever go with an iMac to begin with.

    I would suggest returning the iMac and going with a 15" MacBook Pro and an external display. If you really don't want a laptop and if that doesn't suit you, then I'd say go with a Hackintosh if you're feeling adventurous, go with a refurbished Mac Pro (on Apple's refurbished Mac section of their online store) if you need the performance and don't want to be bothered with the hassle of making a Hackintosh, or if neither of those suit you and/or you don't need that much performance either way, just get a higher-end Mac mini. Either way, regardless of which of the four options I've laid out here you want to go with, you are free to get whatever external display you want.

    As for the touch-screen element to the HP, it's more or less superfluous in Windows 7. It'll be given much more attention in Windows 8, but if you've read about Windows 8 so far, you'll probably agree that at the rate they're going, it'll flop for everything except for the ARM-based tablets that are due to come out with it. That being said, that HP all-in-one isn't an ARM tablet, so it's basically a stupid feature that you won't use much of anyway.
     
  12. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #12
    Hmm I already have a 15 inch MBP. So I can buy a display for that (which display is best bang for the buck?) But we need extra computer for the family so maybe I should buy a 17 inch cheap HP laptop (like 440 at Best Buy) in addition. For the higher-end Mac Mini I thought you can't configure it to be quad core like the iMacs are?


    But this article says that iMacs nowadays are good bang for the buck! http://www.macworld.com/article/155643/2010/11/imac_ode.html

     
  13. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #13
    You can get a Mac mini Server and then just wipe it and load the non-Server OS. Though, really, I think you'll still be hard-pressed to find many applications able of utilizing more than 2 cores.

    The iMac is a great bang-for-the-buck within the context of Apple's line-up. However, when you consider that the same hardware can be put into a (non-Apple) tower for half the price, you'll find that the only real benefit to getting an iMac over any other desktop is to have that fast of a machine with Apple's blessing for running Mac OS X. Outside of that context, it's grossly overpriced for what you get inside. That and given its increased likelihood for failure (both in and out of warranty), it's not a great machine in my opinion.

    If we're talking about a family machine, get a Mac mini and really any monitor as long as it supports HDMI, DisplayPort (or miniDisplayPort), or DVI, or hell, even VGA. I seriously doubt a "family machine" needs quad-core power. Or turn your current 15" MBP (assuming it's a few generations old) into the new family machine and them get a new one for yourself, unless you own a current generation 15" MBP, in which case a Mac mini will be more than enough for your family; if you have any gamer children, I'm gonna say you should get the higher-end Mac mini so you can get the better graphics processor.
     
  14. zarf2007 macrumors regular

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    #14

    What you fail to mention when you say the hackintosh is half the price is you are not including a $1000 IPS screen which would bring the price way up. You are not comparing like for like. Add to that the noise/heat of a tower and the crap/ugly design of a non iMac and the disadvantages add up quickly...

    I get tired of arguing with windows 7 users as to why Macs/OSX is better, a recent conversation with my brother-in-law ended with me saying:

    When you changed cars from a toyota to a BMW, you commented that everything in the BMW seemed to be slicker, smoother, higher quality and a more comfortable drive, that is what changing from Windows to OSX/Mac is like, it just works and unless you experience it you will keep listing hardware specs on a pc.....but thats missing the point. If you run a crap OS (windows) on any hardware that experience sucks.

    If you go down the hackintosh route, you get all of the heat/noise/hacks that break the OS crap which takes away the fundamental reason for owning a Mac, to get a quality hassle free experience to be able to do what you want to do without endless patches/bloatware other crap stopping you doing it!

    /end of rant!
     
  15. Yebubbleman, Feb 5, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012

    Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #15
    To be fair, you can find said IPS screen for cheaper than the $1000 premium that Apple charges. Even barring that, 90% of iMac users don't need an IPS screen, but are forced to pay for one anyway in buying an iMac.

    Heh...if you want to talk about heat, there is no bigger offender out there than the iMac. At least a tower has proper heat dissipation for the components inside; the iMac is always so close to heating that Apple modified the firmware of its hard drives so that the extra power pin that ordinarily goes to the hard drive access LED on PC towers is used to connect the hard drive's own internal temperature sensor to the logic board. This is a necessity that no other computer, Mac or PC, REQUIRES. Also, if you want to talk about ugly design, try opening up an iMac, and you'll see that inside, it isn't very pretty at all.

    As for noise, you know it isn't impossible to build a quiet tower, right? Even so, I'd rather a noisy tower with proper heat dissipation than a quiet iMac with poor heat dissipation.

    I've worked at an Apple Authorized Service Provider, and save for the influx of people spilling crap in their MacBooks and MacBook Pros, the machines most commonly seen inside the shop are...you guessed it...iMacs.

    Whoa, hey now. I never said that I was more pro-Windows 7 than I am pro-Mac OS X. I'm very pro-Apple, I'm just very anti-iMac. A Mac mini, to me seems kind of stupid, but I appreciate its existence, and for the people who want to buy it, it is the perfect machine. The Mac Pro even, has flaws that I'm not stoked on (for instance, crap GPU options and the necessity to hack a video card's firmware in order to get a newer one than is available from Apple to run). But that doesn't mean that I don't like Mac OS X or even Apple branded hardware designed to run it. I just have a narrow selection of Macs that I don't think are inherently stupid by comparison to their PC hardware counterparts. For instance, the MacBook Pro is the best notebook around. Period.

    First off, if we're going to go with a car analogy, then I've got another one for you. Which is ultimately a more reliable car, a Toyota or a Mercedes? Last I checked, the Toyotas don't die. Similarly the hardware on a Hackintosh, provided you don't go with the cheapest stuff out there, likely won't die before you naturally replace the components anyway. Sure, the Mercedes costs more and looks nicer and probably feels slicker for a time, but there's no reason why you should need to spend that much more money on a car.

    That being said, Mac OS X is an amazing operating system, and it is no less amazing on a smoothly-running Hackintosh than it is on an actual Apple-branded Mac. It's not like you suddenly lose the benefit of having moved away from Windows to begin with by opting out of using Apple's hardware. Does it require more work to set up, yes. Does performing your own oil change require more work than having someone else do it, yes.

    Judging from what you say here, I'm guessing that you have never built a Hackintosh, or know what goes into building one, or how the times have dramatically changed for those building one.

    I'll be happy to enlighten you. For one, there are no heat issues. Period. Again, no other computer out there has as much consistent heating issues as the Apple iMac does. Gaming PC laptops come very very close. Secondly, if you go cheap on the Power Supply, you will have a noisy machine. Otherwise, there are no noise issues either. As for hacks, the only software components that are different between a Hackintosh's installation of Mac OS X from a real Mac's installation of Mac OS X is a modified bootloader, and drivers. That's it. The kernel is (unless you are using way older hardware) stock, the rest of the OS is stock. Every time you run a point release update (such as 10.7.3), you download the update and before you reboot your computer, you re-file away your drivers, and then you reboot and that's it. No intense hackery. No nothing. I'm given the speed and power of the iMac along with the upgradability it never had, without the heat and hardware reliability problems it inherently has. Sounds like win to me.

    Obviously, this route isn't for everyone. If you don't know enough about computers and if you don't want to know in order to use your damn machine, then by all means, get a Mac mini as they don't require you to do anything but plug the thing in and turn it on. But if you know what you're doing, you can still save money (even with an IPS display if someone so chooses) and get a machine that will last you much longer. Having once owned an iMac, I can attest that once your internal hard drive gets full, there's nothing you can really do except buy a new one and pay an obscene fee to have it upgraded by someone who may or may not be authorized by Apple to even do such a procedure (and given how complicated that repair is, you definitely want them to be). Sounds like a terrible deal to me. At least Toyotas can be modded.;)

    As for "ugliness", I have two thoughts on that word when used in the context of computers.

    1, my computer is a tool, not a fashion accessory. I'm not buying it because it looks nice; I'm buying it because it is the best thing out there for what I want to do. People on these forums tend to forget that when all is said and done, these are machines; we buy them to get a (series of) job(s) done, not to stand around and look pretty to passersby. That being said, if by getting a prettier computer, I'm sacrificing functionality, that sounds like too much form, too little function, and at that point, you miss the entire point of owning a computer to begin with.

    2, I look at "ugliness" from a more practical design standpoint. When you open up a custom-built PC tower, while you might see wires everywhere (unless the builder uses twist-ties), you have immediate and easy access to every component should anything break down. (Laughably, this isn't typically true of name-branded PC desktops, which is why I am being specific to custom-built towers.) If you pick a pretty enough case, then as far as PC towers go, as far as JUST hardware goes, you have just as pretty of a machine as any Mac. Though, I'll clarify that by saying that the iMac isn't a pretty machine. Externally, it's gorgeous. But internally, it's a nightmare. And really, those two are two sides to the same coin; you can't judge one without the other and have a complete judgement of the thing. Sure, you may never open it, but that doesn't mean that it won't ever have to be opened; more likely than not, it will, and having been there before, I'll attest, from the fully exposed power supply that can shock and kill you if you are not careful to the necessity to pull the IPS panel you love so much just to even get that far, to how crammed everything is, it's nowhere near pretty in there. The Mac minis are bad about how annoying it is to get at internal parts, but they don't offend anywhere near as bad as the iMac does. The unibody MacBook Pro, on the other hand is as beautiful on the inside as it is on the outside. It's as easy to get at every part as it is on a PC tower; just unscrew the bottom plate, and you have access to everything. It's great engineering, and is by no means, inside or out, "ugly".
     
  16. zarf2007 macrumors regular

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    #16


    Actually I have previously built a hackintosh, it was back in the days of snow leopard so while things may be more streamlined now there is still a chance that a future patch/version of the OS will break things and its hassle that people could do without....

    I have the top of the line 2011 iMac, regularly put it through its paces and have zero issues with heat/noise (with SSD it is silent). Yes you can do this on a hackintosh but for how much? and while you state most people don't need an IPS screen even if one can be had for half of what I quoted that still brings the cost of a high end hackintosh + screen to the same or more than the entry level iMac.

    To the original thread starter, if you want a family computer with zero virus issues, stability and at a reasonable price you cannot get a better all in one deal than an entry level iMac.

    as for uglyness, while I use a computer as a tool it is a bonus if it looks nice. The fact that it is all in one with minimal clutter is also a nice to have.

    if my HD dies anytime soon I can add a firewire/TB external model if I don't want to replace it internally. A little more clutter on the desk but nowhere near as bad as a regular PC.

    The fact that you worked in an apple authorised repair centre means that you saw a lot of faulty imacs. If you worked in a HP repair centre you would see a hell of a lot more faulty PCs.

    And one think that cannot be denied is apple after sales care, especially if you purchase applecare, beats anything any other PC vendor can offer....good luck with trying to get a dell replaced after 3 repairs.

    I have build PC's for many years and you know what? lifes too short to be wasting on crap like that. I want a computer that works when I want to use it and I am not interested in v2.2.3.3f of the latest ATI driver that will get me 1% performance increase that I will never notice....

    Buying an apple computer separates the men from the boys, going back to the BMW analogy, I want a quality car that works well and does the job, I dont want to spend weeks in my Garage tuning the engine to get 5mph more from it.....in short, I have a life.
     
  17. Yebubbleman, Feb 5, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012

    Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #17
    You will only break the OS if you fail to follow instructions properly. This was and is true for all versions of Intel-native Mac OS X. As for Snow Leopard and newer, provided you pick a good build, it's incredibly streamlined to keep everything as up-to-date as it would be on a real Mac. Failing to pick a good build will cause you no shortage of problems.

    No, you can actually build an i7 Hackintosh with an IPS monitor for exactly what an i5 iMac costs.

    Also, consider yourself lucky that you have yet to have problems with heating. Odds aren't in your favor.

    You actually can. A Mac mini as they are far more reliable. Even more than that, a Linux PC; though I imagine app compatibility will be an issue after a while.

    Again, you are not factoring how ugly it is on the inside making it looking nice a merely superficial feature. Again, the point to buying a computer isn't it looking nice; it's it running nice and not being failure-proned.

    Right, because that's not inconvenient at all. :rolleyes:

    You and I aren't comparing HPs to iMacs. Also my Apple Authorized Service Provider also worked on PCs. We saw one or two HP all-in-ones for every thirty iMacs. Sure, that's likely because we're not an HP authorized outfit, but I imagine that HP's all-in-ones don't have as many customers as customers looking for a machine in that price range have more than one option to choose from.

    Again, I don't know where you get the idea that I'm a pro-Windows guy, let alone a pro-HP/pro-Dell guy. Yes, AppleCare is unbeatable. If you don't want to get your hands dirty with something like a Hackintosh, AppleCare is probably the single best thing about owning a Mac. This is why every Mac I've ever bought, every iPod I've ever bought, every iPad I have ever bought (which, albeit, is only one-strong so far), has AppleCare.

    Believe it or not, I don't care about having the latest drivers or the most finely tuned performance. I want, just like you, for my computer to work when I sit down to use it. Life is too short for that kind of crap. That being said, life is also too short to be dealing with the myriad of problems associated with a poorly engineered all-in-one computer that only offers beauty on the outside and not on the inside.

    Furthermore, money doesn't grow on trees, so I want to get the best possible bang for my buck. The iMac also fails to deliver on that front.

    Man, even as an Apple fanboy, I have a lot of problems with that statement. As someone who deals with this stuff for a living, I can assure you that there is no men vs. boys disparity between those who buy a Mac over a PC. There is however between those who feel that there is versus those that don't.

    Incidentally, you don't need to do that with any Toyota either. Again, they're reliable even without modification. Similarly, if you do things correctly on a Hackintosh, you don't need to spend weeks or even hours tweaking it. Yes, it's more effort than either an Apple-branded Mac or even a PC, but the final product can be no less reliable.

    I actually take offense to this statement, because I have one too. In fact, every single computer recommendation I make is toward the end of the end user ALSO having a life. When the day is done, I want to check Facebook, watch YouTube videos of cats, read and respond to e-mail, and send and receive instant messages just like everyone else. This also means that I want my things working properly, and I don't want to have to go out and buy any external hardware to accomplish the tasks that should be accomplished by a working internal part; that seems to kill the whole point of an ALL-IN-ONE. The necessity to do so also equates to BAD ENGINEERING!

    So yeah, an iMac looks nicer externally, but if you consider prolonged reliability and ease of service (and not to mention inevitability of service), it's suddenly a poor proposition.
     
  18. wrinkster22 macrumors 68030

    wrinkster22

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    #18
    anyone who thinks you can "just run Hackintosh on it" clearly should not attempt that

    Like GGJ said
    1) Windows is crap
    2) Putting OSX on a PC is illegal



    in future reference;
    -could you please snip these posts
    -not use forums for chat
    -getting the thread off topic

    thanks
     
  19. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #19
    No ****. That being said, it's not impossible or even all that difficult unless the person doing it knows little about computers or how Mac OS X works or both.

    That being said, wrinkster22 is right, a Hackintosh is probably not the solution for you. Again, I'd say either get a Mac mini and an accompanying monitor or get a new 15" MacBook Pro and repurpose your old one as the family machine. Either way.



    1) Irrelevent; point already established eons ago
    2) It's about as illegal as jaywalking and last I checked, that wasn't frowned upon anywhere near as much as the illegality of building (and mind you, not selling) a Hackintosh.

    Last I checked, we were still on topic. The OP steered the conversation in the direction that it currently is in. It's called a debate, and last I checked those were not in poor taste on forums like these. That being said, I entreat you to report me to the mods if you feel that I am violating any rules.
     
  20. wrinkster22 macrumors 68030

    wrinkster22

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    #20
    I am not going to report you, infact I have never reported a real person on MR,
    I just though it would be beneficial to steer the thread back to the OP, it almost seems as he is scared to jump it now.

    Re: Hackintosh steeling,
    there is a long debate that could ensue about this but I would rather just agree to disagree :eek:
     
  21. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #21
    :p
    Have you ever reported a fake person on MR? (Sorry I couldn't resist.:p)

    Or he's just not at his computer yet. That being said, the OP did originally steer the conversation to Hackintoshing. His debate was iMac vs. HP vs. other. He asked about Hackintoshing, the ensuing debate was about why the first two sucked and why "other" is the preferred option, to which I tried to debunk stupid Hackintosh myths while pointing out that the iMac is about as bad of a buy as any HP and that the OP should consider either a Mac mini or a MacBook Pro if not a Mac Pro. Seems pretty linear and on-topic to me.

    I mean, you pretty much pointed out that he's probably not the type that should do it anyway (and I agree with that), so legality or illegality, while being a conversation all onto itself, is more or less irrelevant.
     
  22. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

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    #22
    I do have the 2010 15MBP. Which spec for the Mac mini should I get and I all those terminologies in association with the monitor are unfamiliar to me so I wouldn't know how to go about looking for one with all those features. I wanted my family to be able to use FinalCut Pro (although I don't even know how to use it yet) to edit family videos and make our own movies. And also I like having a lot of browsers/ apps on at the same time so I want to be able to do that too. And I like things to load fast.

    I also would like to know sooner or later how to build a Hackintosh and what PC tower would be the best bang for the buck to buy in order to do that.
     
  23. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    Los Angeles, CA
    #23
    The Mac mini has two ports for video, Thunderbolt (which for all practical monitor-related purposes, is the same connection as miniDisplayPort) and HDMI. They give you a complimentary HDMI to DVI adapter with the mini, or you can leave the HDMI port open (for plugging in a TV) and buy a miniDisplayPort to DVI adapter from Apple. Up to you. You want a monitor that supports HDMI, miniDisplayPort, or DVI or any combination thereof. A monitor that supports the full-sized displayPort is fine, though you'll need an adapter.

    insanelymac.com is a great place to start. Again, if you're new to computers and/or not great with them, it will be challenging, but it's by no means impossible.
     
  24. piatti thread starter macrumors 6502a

    piatti

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Location:
    USA
    #24
    I was worrying Mac Mini might lag if I tried to have lots of apps open. Is that not true?
     
  25. wrinkster22 macrumors 68030

    wrinkster22

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2011
    Location:
    Toronto
    #25
    I dont know where people get these ideas..
    The mac mini is very powerful.
    Just get 8gb of ram from newegg of crucial or amazon or wherever
     

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