A Question About Torrenting/P2P Illegal File Sharing

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by TheSVD, May 31, 2010.

  1. TheSVD macrumors 6502a

    TheSVD

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2008
    Location:
    The Jolly Ol' Midlands, England
    #1
    Right, heres something my aunty brought up the otehr day which i found rather interesting:

    The industries claim that illegal file downloading loses companies $x a year. However, if the technology of illegal file downloading wasn't available, or if it was suddenly stopped, how many of those people would actually go out and buy the media they could get for free? I know my brother used to do it alot, and upon questioning him, he said he never would have bought all the stuff he downloaded. Surely this makes their claims inaccurate?

    Any thoughts/views on this?
     
  2. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #2
    Back in the day of CD players, I had only a handful of CD's. Seven, I believe. If I wanted to listen to all those lovely songs that had passed, I'd have to hope it would, by chance, play on the radio. These were songs I liked to hear, but would NEVER consider buying.

    My options:
    Be patient, it may come on the radio and quench all
    Spend $15 on the song I want, plus eleven other crap tracks.

    Seriously, Come Sail Away is OK, but I don't want to have to tolerate the hour of acid trips that envelope it, much less for $15.

    I own Michael Jackson on cassettes and CD's, therefore I feel justified downloading those songs. Besides, I wore out my Thriller cassette around '98, does that mean I should pay for the right to own that music all over again?
     
  3. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    #3
    This isn't the first time this argument has been brought up, a few software publishers actually did away with any type of authentication system because it was a pain for their real customers and didn't stop people from cracking it.

    The theory makes perfect economic sense, but the problem is if companies simply give up and allow pirates to have their way it is likely to create a culture of stealing IPs and then the people who would have bought the product originally would be turned to pirate it.
     
  4. ethical macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    #4
    Of course it's inaccurate, and this is an argument that pro-piracy groups use all the time. Doesn't stop the media companies from claiming it's true though.
     
  5. TheSVD thread starter macrumors 6502a

    TheSVD

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2008
    Location:
    The Jolly Ol' Midlands, England
    #5
    Yeah i thought so, but i just thought i'd ask it here cause i knew i'd get some decent responses :) And yeah i've noticed some companies just have no protection anymore, its kinda sad how they've just given up. I didnt say that that should happen, nor should they give up. I'm not pro piracy, but they sare some interesting points.

    Yeah i thought it would be! Haha i had no idea, my aunty just brought it up the other day :) And yeah, i guess they would be biased and try to make it look like the worst case scenario.
     
  6. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #6
    Do I believe they are losing money to pirates yes because there are a lot of people who have pirated something and now will not go out in buy it.
    It is not a 1 to 1 ratio but it is clearly there. Would sales of something increase if there was no pirating of it, I believe it would. I would say for ever 10 pirated copies of lets say a movie they might loose 1 sale. Of a hit movie that number would be a lot lower to may 5 to 1.

    I am not a fan of pirated protection in software that I buy because it annoys me when I want to use it legitly.

    Now if you take apple old quick time pro I would say for it was a 100 to 1 ratio that might of lost. I know plenty of people who crack that old quick pro threw 2005 because of the very VERY annoying upgrade to pro advertisement that would pop up.
     
  7. bobertoq macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    #7
    I used to do that a lot and I most certainly wouldn't have bought everything I got (if I didn't pirate it). I wouldn't spend all that money on music (I wouldn't have even had enough money to buy everything I pirated). I would have found a way to listen to new music without piracy, too. I did, however, go to concerts and buy merchandise from bands that I "stole" from.

    But torrenting really is killing music, just like home taping did:
    [​IMG]
    Taken from official RIAA website.
     
  8. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #8
    It doesn't work that way. You own the media in the specific medium that you purchased. Just because you own one form of the artist's work doesn't entitle you to the other forms because your needs change. If you bought the cassette then that's what you bought, it doesn't give you rights to the vinyl, the CD, the DVD, the concert, etc.

    No matter how advanced we get, intellectual property is going to always be a debated topic.
     
  9. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #9
    No, I'd have to pay for the physical media, and they don't offer a way to attain it without ALSO paying for the music again. I'd gladly pay for another tape, it's the tiny charge for the intellectual property that bites.

    So I personally feel justified downloading songs that I already own the media to.
     
  10. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #10
    ^^^ I understand what you are saying, but the way the laws are written at this point you can't separate the intellectual property from the media format. It's just not a one and done deal. That's why there was such dissatisfaction with DRM. People wanted to purchase something and then be able to do what they wanted with it. The artist and producers are just starting to undersand this and that is why we are seeing all the movement toward DRM free content.
     

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