ACTA more countries not ratifying.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Happybunny, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #1
    So far Germany,Netherlands, Bulgaria, have declined to sign.
    This summer it must be signed by the EU parliament, before it can be made law across Europe.:)

    Various committees of the EU parliament have take the treaty under scrutiny, and do not like what they see.:mad:

    There are more signs that as Euro parliament members begin to gauge the depth of feeling against, there is a ground swell against ACTA.:)
     
  2. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    ****ing Cunty National and their ******** policies have already signed ACTA. Spineless chickens, don't represent New Zealand at all.
     
  3. KingYaba macrumors 68040

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    I'm glad they're not signing it. These media corporations pretend like they don't have recourse and it's really tiring.
     
  4. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    I'm glad as well. Anything we can do to avoid propping up a failing industry that refuses to change and relies on the government and litigation to exist is good
     
  5. LiesForTheLiars macrumors regular

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    ACTA is utterly retarded. Anyone with half a brain can see that. I'm surprised anyone is signing it. Maybe they didn't read what it is.
     
  6. (marc), Feb 27, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012

    (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #6
    I do not like ACTA and I really appreciate that some governments are not signing it. But I think much of the protest against it is misplaced.

    Pretty much all protestors will fall in at least one of the following categories:
    • People who tape their mouths, implying that ACTA leads to censorship laws. This is completely made up, ACTA contains nothing to that effect.
    • Teens who think that because they all download copyrighted content without paying means that it should be legal. They're wrong, and it shouldn't. There are so many who say "I'm not going to pay $9.99 (*gasp!*) for just one album!". I wonder who they are to dictate prices.
    • People who wear Guy Fawkes masks. Apparently they support Anonymous, who mostly engage in internet vandalism.

    The general public and even a lot of the protestors are quite misinformed about ACTA. This is sad, because the ridiculous protests against it devalue the protests against other bills, which are far worse in terms of censorship, surveillance, etc.


    Did you read it? As far as I know, it doesn't contain anything that would change the current copyright laws regarding the internet.
     
  7. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    If it's anything like SOPA (which it apparently is), it gives governments the ability to arbitrarily shut down websites which are deemed in violation of the law without first proving that they are in a court of law.

    As for your comment about prices. The market dictates prices, so if people are unwilling to pay $9.99 for a CD (they're actually closer to 13-14 but whatever), guess what? It's not worth that much. Corporations need to adjust their pricing scheme instead of propping up their industry through litigation which only results in more negative sentiment against them.

    Artists don't make money off CDs.

    The RIAA and MPAA are gatekeepers and rely on being able to purchase and accumulate copyright instead of producing anything. Their business model dictates how you can access media, not the media itself. Example, loaning a book. Two people gained the intellectual property, yet one copy was purchased. No different than sharing a song.

    What's the fundamental difference between sharing with 5 people? 10? 20? 500? 1000? Who gets to draw the line and what's their objective criteria for doing so?

    That's not a valid business model and we're going to see an end to it. Copyright and patent laws are inherently bad for society and a free market since they slow down innovation and foster profiteering.
     
  8. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #8
    As far as I know, ACTA does not allow that. SOPA/PIPA were much more extensive laws.

    The fundamental difference, as stated by ACTA, is when the person makes money out of illegal file-sharing.
     
  9. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    It's not just that though. From what I've read some of the concerns are that it makes generic drugs illegal, and it's going to have an adverse affect on free software as well as lead to more surveillance, and searches. None of those are worth it to me, as a citizen, to make sure somebody doesn't download a song that they probably wouldn't have bought anyway.
     
  10. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    European government officials have repeatedly claimed that ACTA does not change the current legislation. Of course they could be lying.

    There's a difference between somebody downloading a song and somebody running an illicit file-sharing business:
     
  11. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #11
    Than it's pointless. SO why bother with it?


    Not in the eyes of the media corporations. I do agree that those businesses should be shut down though unless they're making money through advertisement or some other device not related to the file contents.
     
  12. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #12
    Maybe simply to be part of the agreement. Imagine policies like "we only make our content available in countries that have ratified ACTA". I really don't know that though.

    Possibly. Thankfully, the media corporations are not part of the jurisdiction.
     

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