Adobe Names Most Popular Emoji in New Study

oldwatery

macrumors 6502a
Sep 16, 2003
742
294
0
Maui
www.raymasters.com
I am so glad I am old and lived through a time when people actually spoke to each other over the dining table and wrote letters, using the alphabet.
We are on a fast track to nowhere. Dumb does not even get close to describing where we are as a society.
 

JOHN PRINCE

macrumors newbie
Sep 28, 2018
5
8
0
USA
I'm calling BS on this survey.

“81 percent of emoji users believe that people who use emojis are friendlier and more approachable.”

Really. But that turns out to be a lie, because in actuality…
“65 percent of emoji users said they were more comfortable expressing emotions via emoji rather than a phone call.”

So in fact they’re more distant and detached. The survey says otherwise, because it sounds nicer.

So there’s a narrative that articles like this reinforce without any exploration of the apparent fact that it’s a *false* narrative. This is like when newspapers do surveys about what readers would like to see more of, and it comes up as editorials and hard hitting investigations, etc. But actually people read the sports, comics, and obits.

This survey is aspirational. And it's BS.

I used emojis too, of course. I have maybe 10 that I use, and it's mainly the ones seen in this article. Beyond that they become a barrier to communication. Emojis are like perfume. A little might be nice, but there *definitely* is such a thing as too much. Or maybe it's like someone having a flower in their office, vs someone whose every flat surface has flowers, kittens, cartoon babies... there's a difference between approachable and cloying.
Well said.
I have friends that I used to spend hours with, sitting on the porch or in a pub, talking about interesting topics we both enjoyed.
With some of them, I still can.
But a good number of them have lost the art of conversation. They constantly look on their phone, spent way too much time on Twitter and other “social media”. And, coincidentally, are frequent users of emoji when I communicate with them.
The friends that can still hold a 2-hour conversation without looking on their phone use social media sparingly, rarely use emojis.

“65 percent of emoji users said they were more comfortable expressing emotions via emoji rather than a phone call.”

They’re not really “expressing emotions via emoji”. They don’t now how to express emotions.

My kids, all millennials, quickly embraced all forms of social media when they launched. Thankfully, within a few years, they ditched all of it.

I have long conversations with them. Super enjoyable. No interruptions. Priceless.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Defthand

jfx94

macrumors regular
May 22, 2013
133
15
0
where ever I am at.
N = 1,000 people? That's all? Out of the hundreds of millions of people who text, Adobe could only survey 1,000?

And MacRumors thinks research based on N=1,000 is notable enough to post?

How about a proper study of at least 100,000? And report the cross sectional demographics too. Break down results based on age and gender. What emoji is most used for people over age 50? What's the most common for teens? Where were these users located? For only a thousand surveyed, it could be anywhere.

I guarantee you could do a survey like this in local high schools in NYC for N=1,000. But that wouldn't be representative of the entire population. This is terrible research at best, and an even worse news story.
 

NMBob

macrumors 65816
Sep 18, 2007
1,008
635
0
New Mexico
Pfft. It sounds as if you have issues. I use emoji in several languages.

Emoji provide a shorthand for expressing emotions, body language, or facial expressions that cannot otherwise be readily conveyed via impersonal text communications. I still properly capitalize and punctuate my text messages, but I also use emoji when appropriate to punctuate a joke, express affection for my wife, or give one of my kids a virtual hug.
Ha! I love you. XOXO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jhfenton

Ubele

macrumors 6502a
Mar 20, 2008
631
97
0
Emoji provide a shorthand for expressing emotions, body language, or facial expressions that cannot otherwise be readily conveyed via impersonal text communications. I still properly capitalize and punctuate my text messages, but I also use emoji when appropriate to punctuate a joke, express affection for my wife, or give one of my kids a virtual hug.
I'm surprised at all the emoji hate here. I've been a professional writer and editor, in one capacity or another, for almost 30 years. I admit that I resisted emoji at first, but I came around. Communication involves both the message sender's intended meaning and the recipient's perception of the intention. Email text lacks the visual and audio components of body language, facial expressions, and vocal tone. Especially in workplace emails, where people might not know each other well, the recipient might assume anger, frustration, irritation, or sarcasm in a message where none is intended. A well-placed exclamation point and a smiley face can prevent that from happening.

Of course, it depends on the context. If I'm emailing one of our senior executives, or a colleague whom I know prefers formality, then I avoid exclamation points and emoji. If I'm emailing one of my bubbly, extraverted colleagues, then I include the occasional exclamation point or emoji. When I'm corresponding with one of my old friends who also happen to be writers, I rarely use emoji, because we know each other well enough that we rarely read unintended meanings into each other's messages, and we grew up in the pre-emoji era. When I'm texting my wife, I always include hearts, kissy faces, and smiley faces, because she loves them, and she'd probably think I was mad at her if I didn't include them. When I'm texting other friends, I sometimes include martini glasses, birthday cakes, tacos, palm trees, and other emoji because, well, I think they're fun.

On the other hand, I draw the line at multiple exclamation points, all-caps text, and trendy slang, because those just aren't "me." (I don't "rock" an iPhone XR, I just own one. :))
 

jhfenton

macrumors 6502a
Dec 11, 2012
907
471
0
Cincinnati, Ohio
I am so glad I am old and lived through a time when people actually spoke to each other over the dining table and wrote letters, using the alphabet.
We are on a fast track to nowhere. Dumb does not even get close to describing where we are as a society.
I suggest that you and the other emoji curmudgeons subscribe and listen to the Pessimists Archive Podcast: A History of Why We Resist New Things. All of the episodes are great, but this thread reminds me of a few in particular: Episode 1: The Walkman; Episode 2: The Good Ol' Days; Episode 3: Recorded Music; Episode 14: The Novel; Episode 16: The Telegraph; and Episode 18: Kids These Days.

Emoji are neither a cause of nor a sign of the decay of youth, communication, or civilization more broadly.
 

Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
670
1,023
0
I don't understand how this site hasn't added emoji support to its forums yet.
Probably using MySQL with utf8 character set, which doesn't support 4-byte characters. Moving a database as large as the MacRumors forum to utf8mb4 would be significant and probably not worth the effort since the only benefit would be displaying emojis.
 

Dave-Z

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
670
1,023
0
58 percent of emoji users said they're more likely to open up an email from a brand that uses emoji in the subject line,
I'm 100% more likely to flag an email as Junk when I see an emoji in the subject line.
 

gaximus

macrumors 6502a
Oct 11, 2011
926
1,187
0
I'm so old, that in my days, they were called emoticons or smileys, and they were entirely made up of punctuation marks.

But to be honest, I don't get the whole emoji craze.
  • Use of anything but the classic smiling, sad, or laughing one is highly ambiguous and I have no idea what you're trying to say (like if you send me a gorilla or one expressing a complex emotion, like crying but laughing but also wearing glasses and riding a shark). Like, what are you trying to say? Why don't you just write it down instead?
  • Using them often makes you seem childish and immature, equivalent to TYP1NG EVERY7HING LIKE TH!S111
Seriously, when would you ever use an emoji depicting garlic? Or butter toast? Why would you ever have to use those? Since when is typing "dog" slower than opening up the emoji panel and scrolling through a quadrillion of emojis to find the one that looks like a dog?
I agree I hardly ever use emojis over text, but I do like using them in titles of things. Like some of my group messages names use emojis, just makes it more fun, it does take longer to use than typing, but for a title it can be worth the time.
 

nexusrule

macrumors 6502
Aug 11, 2012
458
388
0
Andy Rooney must be spinning in his grave. To me, it's a pointless keyboard interface getting in the way.
Radical idea here, how about use a set of emoji that combined can create something that, well we can call a word, and by putting lots of emoji together you get lots of words that make a sentece.

Let's call them letters, and allow people to express themselves in a manner other can understand ....

I know it sounds wierd, but we can create a keyboard for them to make it easier, this would totally change the world.

I also have a slogan : "26 emojis, always in your pocket, express yourself!"


They did :apple::);):(:mad::confused::cool::p:D:eek::oops::rolleyes:o_O
After Thousands of years worth of human language development..... we are now regressing back to cave paintings.
Emoji users think emojis are great - no **** sherlock.
What a waste of pixels
When taking in person we communicate with words, eyes, hands, tone of voice, posture, gestures etc. If we talk at the phone we still have voice (tone, volume, mood).

Do some of you genius have a working alternative to emoji to express all the emotions words can’t convey alone or you just criticize for the sake of criticize?

And no, words can’t convey everything, unless you spend a lot of time picking every word and punctuation sign of every sentence *and* someone has a very good grasp of writing and language. Is not exactly ideal if you want to have s conversation, isn’t it?
 

Defthand

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,246
1,614
0
Emoji are neither a cause of nor a sign of the decay of youth, communication, or civilization more broadly.
Youth and civilization have always had their flaws. Pessimists are people who are experienced enough to recognize the fact and have concern. Promoting—or ignoring—the flaws is irresponsible.
 

thisisnotmyname

macrumors 68000
Oct 22, 2014
1,902
4,123
0
known but velocity indeterminate
Andy Rooney must be spinning in his grave. To me, it's a pointless keyboard interface getting in the way.
I had to Google Andy Rooney but thank you, you've completed the emoji bingo I started in the other thread: old person ranting about other than latin characters in communication. :)

edit: after reading about who Andy Rooney was, in the future I suggest updating your reference to "Lewis Black." Still a bit dated but I think more people will understand the reference.
 
Last edited:

31 Flavas

macrumors 6502
Jun 4, 2011
489
246
0
I don't understand how this site hasn't added emoji support to its forums yet.
OMG how dare MacRumors even think about adding more emoji! Thanks a lot - we’re going to miss out on news because of adding more emoji. :mad:
 

nexusrule

macrumors 6502
Aug 11, 2012
458
388
0
When talking in person we communicate with words, eyes, hands, tone of voice, posture, gestures etc. If we talk at the phone we still have voice (tone, volume, mood).

Do some of you genius have a working alternative to emoji to express all the emotions words can’t convey alone or you just criticize for the sake of criticize?

And no, words can’t convey everything, unless you spend a lot of time picking every word and punctuation sign of every sentence *and* someone has a very good grasp of writing and language. Is not exactly ideal if you want to have s conversation, isn’t it?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Akrapovic

Akrapovic

macrumors 6502a
Aug 29, 2018
511
732
0
Scotland
theracingline.net
Indeed. Emoji is a good replacement for tone of voice and body language.

However it seems people would rather be angry! OMG I hate emojis! Fun articles? How dare we have those! What a waste of pixels! I pay per pixel and I'm outraged! A picture says a thousand words, except now god damn it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: MEJHarrison

gaximus

macrumors 6502a
Oct 11, 2011
926
1,187
0
Forget apple being doomed we are. lol
The difference being these are not replacing our language, they are an addition to be more expressive, if you want to use them. They are also universal and while you couldn't write an entire sentence using emojis you could express something to someone that doesn't speak the same language as you.

Also I don't know what a single one of the glyphs means, and I doubt many people do. while my 3 year old can tell me what almost all of the emojis mean.
 

Defthand

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,246
1,614
0
In seriousness, I use emojis when contacting people in my organization that I have never met. That way they get the right tone of humility and friendliness, rather than cold hard demands from someone they don't know.
If I received a business-related email with cartoon embellishments, I'd be insulted that someone though I needed to be addressed like a child. Would you send an email with emoji to a superior?

As a side note, courts are having difficulty interpreting the implied meaning of emoji in company emails that are submitted as evidence. Imagine if an employee included "kissy face" emoji in emails to a coworker of the opposite sex? They could be a smoking gun for a sexual harassment claim even if that was not their implied meaning. If I were an employer, I would ban their use.
 

Akrapovic

macrumors 6502a
Aug 29, 2018
511
732
0
Scotland
theracingline.net
If I received a business-related email with cartoon embellishments, I'd be insulted that someone though I needed to be addressed like a child. Would you send an email with emoji to a superior?

As a side note, courts are having difficulty interpreting the implied meaning of emoji in company emails that are submitted as evidence. Imagine if an employee included "kissy face" emoji in emails to a coworker of the opposite sex? They could be a smoking gun for a sexual harassment claim even if that was not their implied meaning. If I were an employer, I would ban their use.
If you're at work and one of the thoughts you have in your head is "How would this look in court?" then your company has bigger problems than Emoji use in emails.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Paradoxally