AirPlay music from iPhone to ATV – Ethernet recommended?

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by GM1980, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. GM1980 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    #1
    Hi all,

    Currently I stream music from my iPhone 6 Plus with iOS 8 (Music stored on the phone and Spotify) to Apple TV 3.

    The ATV is connected wirelessly to my router as all the ports are currently used (they are right beside one another).

    Maybe once every couple of hours or so the AirPlay connection seems to drop which is annoying.

    My question is, would there be any advantage in a wired Ethernet connection from ATV to the router?

    As far as I can tell no data would be sent directly from the net to ATV in this situation? Or would a wired connection increase the reliability in general?

    Thanks for any advice on this, or other tips to stop these dropouts.

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
  2. jamesjingyi, Feb 10, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015

    jamesjingyi macrumors 6502a

    jamesjingyi

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    THIS IS WRONG! DO NOT LISTEN TO ME :D SORRY FOR ANY CONFUSION CAUSED
    "I don't think this will work (correct me if I am wrong) but AirPlay works over Wifi and/or Bluetooth only and does not support ethernet connections. The ethernet is to connect the TV to the router directly to improve the reliability of the connection to the internet but not to AirPlay devices. Try switching the channel of your router using a software to determine the best channel (what router are you using?)"
     
  3. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    #3
    Yes it would increase reliability. Right now the Airplay data travels from your phone to the router and from the router to your ATV. That's two wifi failure points. Put the ATV on ethernet and you've just reduced your failure points in half.

    PS Ignore the second poster, I really have no idea what he was trying to say but it is very wrong....
     
  4. GM1980 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
    #4
    Thanks both, cheers Paul I will remove something from the router and wire up ATV and see how it goes.

    Greg
     
  5. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #5
    you're being corrected.

    airplay is network traffic, and as such, will travel over any network connection.

    airplay does not need bluetooth to work, but occasionally bonjour* doesn't work well, or is sometimes blocked on networks. in that case your devices can use bluetooth to discover each other, and figure out how to talk to each other over the network. after that the actual airplay traffic travels over wi-fi or wired network.


    *bonjour is what apple uses for devices to broadcast services over the network.
    Your mac uses it to advertise file or screen sharing, printers use it to advertise themselves.

    you could also get a network switch, run an ethernet cable from a port on the router and you add a bunch more ports.
     
  6. tdale macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    Christchurch, N.Z.
    #6
    Check the local wifi as well as regards channels. I use iStumbler, its a good practice to choose separate channels from nearby routers, 1,6 or 11 for 2.4Ghz. 36, 40, 44, 48, 149, 153, 157, 161, and sometimes 165 for 5Ghz
     
  7. takeshi74, Feb 12, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015

    takeshi74 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    #7
    Generally speaking wired is always recommended over wireless for reliability and performance. Wireless is generally recommended for convenience.

    That said, even if your ATV is wired your iPhone is still going to be wireless but that does rule out one possible point of failure as mentioned above.

    +1 on the comment about adding a switch if you need more ports.


    http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT203822
     
  8. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #8
    Yes.

    Yes, ethernet will increase signal reliability.
     
  9. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #9
    In yosemite you can alt-click the wi-fi icon, select wireless diagnostics, then from the menus go to window->scan (⌘4) and it will tell you the best channels on the left side of the screen.
    **you don't have to run the diagnostics to get there, so don't hit continue.

    I'll turn off my router, so the channels my router is using don't skew the results.
     
  10. tdale macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    Christchurch, N.Z.
    #10
    The statement that Airplay doesn't support ethernet connections is correct. That is DOES is also correct, it depends on the context. Airplay is air play. Not ethernet-play.The ethernet side when connected to an ATV is to allow the ATV is stream better as the source (Netflix, etc, etc)is received via ethernet from the router and not via wifi

    ----------

    Cheers for that. This is what I find frustrating with Apple, all this usefulness, but lack of documentation. Is there a source that documents all these features and shortcuts? I'd never know to alt click that, and on the diagnostics page there was no menu, but command 4 worked. How did you add the command symbol?


    Removing iStumbler now
     
  11. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #11
    Yes.

    For AirPlay to work, one of the devices in the set up needs to be wireless.

    For ease of everything, I recommend that be your iPhone/iPad/laptop.
     
  12. blueroom, Feb 13, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2015

    blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #12
    Not true. They can all be on wired Ethernet if desired. I have several AirPlay devices and the speakers, receivers, ATV's are connected via wired Ethernet.

    My stationary AirPlay sources Synology, iTunes, ATV3 are also on wired Ethernet. My portable devices iPad, iPhone & MacBook are on WiFi. The whole system works perfectly. My only gripe is that the iOS devices can't do multiple AirPlay streams.

    In practice wired Ethernet is much more reliable than WiFi.

    That said, if you're having problems it's probably your network setup. Some WiFi routers are just junk especially the ones supplied from your ISP. For example some old DLink routers couldn't route internally from wired to WiFi.

    FYI: AirPlay uses ALAC for streaming.

    PS AirPlay doesn't use Bluetooth.
     
  13. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #13
    Really?

    Really? So AirPlay is simply a name for sending audio/video over a network and doesn't require a wireless client, like AirDrop at least used to?
     
  14. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #14
    Yep, just a marketing name. I don't know enough about AirDrop but AirDrop needs Bluetooth 4.0 as does Handoff.
     
  15. Uofmtiger, Feb 13, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2015

    Uofmtiger macrumors 68000

    Uofmtiger

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Location:
    Memphis
    #15
    There is the WHAALE app that allows multiple Airplay streams of certain services.

    I personally don't have much need for multiple streams, but when I do want to stream to more than one setup, I get around it it by sending the Airplay stream from my iOS device to my computer running "Airfoil Speakers" and let it send the signal back out to multiple locations using Airfoil.

    For Rdio/Spotify (which would be my most used non-Apple apps), I simply launch them (or keep them open) on a computer and use Airfoil to send the signal to multiple Airplay receivers. With Rdio and Spotify, you can completely control the programs from the iOS apps without sitting in front of the computer. I use TodayRemote in the notifications screen to start playing, skip, control volume, etc. Of course, you need a computer in the mix to do this, but I have a mini for streaming audio and video, so not really much of a problem.

    I should mention that Airfoil can also be controlled via their AFRemote app. It will allow you to control volume of individual speakers and turn them off and on. It also has some basic control of certain apps like Spotify.
     
  16. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #16
    Huh.

    The more you know!

    Though I'm guessing most people, out of convenience, have at least one wireless piece in their system.
     
  17. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #17
    I'll have to take a look at AirFoil, I've seen it and will give it a spin.

    Does it support Genius playlists.
     
  18. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #18
    i had to google and copy and paste off another web page.


    ------

    The name evolved from AirTunes, when it was music streaming only. and it worked on the airport express only.
    Guessing the name came from the device, and not the connection method.
     
  19. Uofmtiger macrumors 68000

    Uofmtiger

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Location:
    Memphis
    #19
    I am not sure I explained it well. There are actually 2 apps that work on your computer and 2 apps that work on your iOS device.

    1. Airfoil - this app loads on your computer and gives you access to all of your Airplay speakers. It will let you select "System Audio" or specific apps like iTunes/Spotify/Rdio. It will steal the audio output from the computer and allow you to send it to any/all Airplay receiver (including the computer's speakers).

    2. Airplay Speakers - This can be loaded on your computer(s). It will make the computer show up on your iOS device as an Airplay receiver. It will show up as the name of your computer in the Airplay device selection in the iOS app or in the Control Center. This allows you to use any audio source on the iOS device and airplay audio to the computer just like any other Airplay receiver. Once your computer is accepting the audio, then you can use Airfoil to push that audio to multiple Airplay receivers.

    3. AFRemote - this is not required to use Airfoil. However, if your computer is in a bedroom and you are in the living room, it will allow you to turn on and off Airplay receivers and control volume of each individual Airplay device. It is an extension/remote for Airfoil that is running on your computer. It also has some basic remote control features to control apps that you are running on a computer. In other words, if you are using Spotify to send audio to multiple Airplay devices, it will allow you to skip songs, pause, play, and see album art on the iOS device. My preference is to only launch AFRemote to control speakers and use the iOS apps for Spotify Connect and Rdio to control their apps running on a computer.

    4. Airfoil Speakers (for iOS) - there is also a separate Airfoil app for iOS. It will allow your iOS device to show up as an Airfoil receiver on the computer (if you downloaded it years ago, it also showed up on another iOS device as a receiver, but Apple removed that feature from future purchases and I don't believe they added it back). However, if you are playing audio on your computer and have your iPhone docked across the room, this allows you to send audio to it because it shows up on the computer as an Airplay receiver. I used this feature quite a bit before I added more Airport Express devices.

    Hope this helps. However, I also want to address your "Genius" question. You don't need Airfoil to get this feature. iTunes has this ability via the Apple Remote app.
     

Share This Page