Al Jazeera America to shut down

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by ericgtr12, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. ericgtr12 macrumors 6502a

    ericgtr12

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    #1
    There's no money in straight fact based news without the sensationalism. Too bad, they were a good neutral news network.
     
  2. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #2
    If you listen carefully, you can hear Al Gore laughing all the way to the bank.

    I had heard they were good at hard news but they are not carried on my cable system.
     
  3. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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  4. Solomani macrumors 68030

    Solomani

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    #4
    Albert 'Al' Jazeera? He's Osama bin Laden's cousin. Goes by the family nickname Al.
     
  5. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #5
    guessing the name had plenty to do with them not making it in America.
     
  6. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #6
    Have you ever watched it? I have.

    Every 30 seconds, everyone would stop what they were doing, point their fingers at the cameras, and scream "INFIDELS" at the top of their lungs. Also, anytime they got on the topic of Israel, one of the reporters would just blow up for no apparent reason.

    It was really awkward.
     
  7. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #7
    I don't think I have "Watched" any of the "news" in a while , I prefer the interweebs
     
  8. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #8
    Al laughed in 2013:

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/07/opinion/kurtz-gore-al-jazeera/

    $70 mil - nice deal, possibly?

    I then read the next paragraph:

    Dang... but in business, would Beck trying to buy it be strange? Surprised he was told "no way"...
     
  9. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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  10. Solomani macrumors 68030

    Solomani

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    #10
    Yah, awkward. But I always loved their recurring segment called Ululation Nation.
     
  11. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #11
    It was pretty boring and they didn't offer that much of differ reports than the rest of the media. I don't feel like I've seen the other side of the coin by watching Al Jazeera America.
     
  12. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #12
    It always pissed me off, cuz it made me think The Lion King was about to come on.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 13, 2016 ---
    INFIDEL!
     
  13. ericgtr12 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    ericgtr12

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    #13
    It's all going the way of the dinosaur, there's no way they can keep up with social media.
     
  14. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #14
    It's too bad. Al Jazeera America did some really good work on the militarization of police and cross-border shootings by U.S. Border Patrol. Their show "Fault Lines" was especially good.

    It's a shame to see any organization that does strong, thoughtful journalism fold up.
     
  15. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #15
    Social media is good at breaking news, and snapshot journalism but not quite as good on stories which require a bit of time and in-depth analysis.
     
  16. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #16
    My friend works there. They had their company picnic each year on 9/11. Guess he needs to look for another job.
     
  17. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #17
    I'll be honest, my first significant exposure to them was listening to Bin Laden tapes, and my initial impression, was they were acting as terrorist mouth pieces. I'm happy to admit this was my error. It would still be interesting to know if they ever editorialized terrorists as being a negative for Islam, or does being a Muslim news network (which I assume they are) mean you'd not allowed to? To be fair, you could ask the same thing about Fox News when it comes to Christianity...
     
  18. ericgtr12 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    ericgtr12

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    #18
    True, and we'll get our chance to read it hours later.
     
  19. Scepticalscribe, Jan 14, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #19
    Most of the original staff of Al Jazeera (I cannot speak for the US version, as I never saw it) were trained by the BBC and brought those standards to the new station.

    In terms of news, while the perspective may be different, I have always found it an excellent and credible source of news, one that I respect and regularly consult, along with the BBC. That doesn't mean that I have to agree with it, always. As a matter of fact, I don't, - anymore than I would always agree with the BBC, excellent though it is, at its best.

    However, they think to do stories that would simply never occur to the older networks, or public broadcasting systems.

    Myself, I think it unfortunate that - as a result of this decision - that the US is being deprived of an excellent and well resourced news service.
     
  20. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #20
    While they no doubt have made some mistakes,many of it's critics are people who think criticising the Israeli state equates to anti-semitism.They are obviously a bit blind when if comes to the Qatari state (which news source that is state owned or indeed privately owned doesn't have a blind spot in relation to news?).
    Although I haven't seen Al Jaz America I believe they tried to muscle in on local US stations something that was always a long shot.It would be a great shame if Al Jaz English went the same way.
     
  21. ericgtr12 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    ericgtr12

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    #21
    Sadly, Americans don't want fact based unbiased news without opinion and hyperbole interjected into it. Any of the major cable networks only survive because they sensationalize all of it, CNN used to be okay but in their race to keep up with FOX have gone off the rails, every story they have now is "breaking news" no matter how trivial it is.
     
  22. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #22


    All true.

    But al-Jazeera America was probably doomed from the outset. Never mind the fact that the name itself probably made most Americans associate it (incorrectly) with middle-east terrorism. Or the fact that very few US cable or satellite networks carried it.

    Part of the problem is the fact that audiences lie. In surveys they tell researchers that they want straight unbiased news. But when it comes to actually clicking through the dial they settle for shows about cake makers or dysfunctional gold miners. The reality is that between the three US broadcast networks, PBS, Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, etc. - there is already a glut of news programming considering the total potential audience.

    Its sad, but in a way I think al-Jazeera would have done better if they actually had taken more of an editorial slant in the news programming. I think that a lot of Americans really are curious about how different people from the middle east see the world. What typical people on the streets of Dubai or Teheran; Haifa and Homs really are thinking about. What they think about their own governments; what they think about much of the turmoil that is troubling their world. And what their honest opinion of the US and Europe's role in middle eastern affairs might be.

    Given that the network is funded by the Qatari government - that was never going to happen.
     
  23. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #23
    Sorry to go on a tangent, but I just loath those kind of people. My aunt, who is a RABBI, was called a "hateful woman" because she dared to suggest that maybe Isreal should treat the Palestinians better.
     
  24. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #24
    There's a lot more on cable TV than 24-hour news stations. We had to cancel cable due to medical bills, and I really miss having it. Streaming TV just doesn't do it for me.
     
  25. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #25
    Right, it would have been a great improvement but it was not going to happen. Another complication would have been that "typical people on the streets of..." only Haifa and possibly Teheran among the several places you mentioned may have felt safe in commenting publicly about much of anything, except maybe how great the cucumbers are at the produce stand where one attempted the interview.

    This is a region where some countries still list sorcery as a capital crime. Sorcery in Islamic countries is not about summoning voodoo curses, it's about blasphemy, heresy, atheism, abandoning Islamic principles (including interpretations of what that means, like your brand of Islam is not the one approved of by the state). And it's a region where you may suddenly vanish forever if you object to having your profitable restaurant or desirable piece of property bought out by a princeling or emissary from the emir for less than market value. So the safest things to say in public are probably... thank you, excuse me or I don't know.

    And the Middle East is still a region where in some countries being seen talking to someone whose purpose is to communicate to the West means taking the risk of being charged as aiding a spy. Or worse, depending on exactly who the parties are. Iran is apparently still quite dodgy that way. There is freedom of speech but using it with Americans in particular can be risky for both parties. Qatar itself has freedom of speech with constitutional protections but has qualifications on it that are far more limiting than those on our own First Amendment.

    Finally journalism in general seems to have become far more risky, not less so, in our "age of information". The pages of Committee to Protect Journalists are always eye opening and the section on the Middle East and North Africa is no exception: https://www.cpj.org/mideast/
     

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