Anybody willing to give me a brief description of how 1Password works?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by jekjones1558, Oct 18, 2014.

  1. jekjones1558, Oct 18, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2014

    jekjones1558 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2010
    #1
    Can anyone give me a short description? Do I need to enter all of my current passwords to begin using it? I know that I should have done this a long time ago but am afraid I will be in over my head. Also, do I need to buy it separately for my MacBook Pro and my iOS devices or do I just buy it on one and I am good to go for all devices? (Please be gentle. I am an old lady.)
     
  2. KUguardgrl13 macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #4
    If you use 1Password with your current passwords that you created, I'm not sure it would work the way it's intended to. You create one master password to access the app, and then you initially create app-generated randomized passwords for each of your accounts. You need to change each of your account passwords in the website or app to the 1Password-generated password and then have your browser on your computer save them. iOS apps should also remember them unless you reset your settings. If you need the password to something, you login to the 1Password app with your master password select the login, and copy and paste the password into the website or app on whichever device you're using. It's more steps than just remembering passwords you create, but these passwords are usually less easy for a hacked to figure out. They're more secure :)

    As for the Mac and iOS apps, I believe you need to buy each one from the App Store unless they have a bundle option on the developer's website (I know they do for multiple computers, but I'm not sure about computers and portable devices). You can get away with only having one or the other, but it makes it difficult if you need a password and don't have access to the device with 1Password on it.

    Hope that helps!
     
  3. jekjones1558 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 27, 2010
    #5
    So if I am understanding you correctly: I buy 1password and create a master password. Then as I use various sites where I already have passwords I would login with my current password and then go to 1password to have it create a new password then substitute that new password for the old one. Then in the future 1password would remember all of these new passwords for me and I just need to remember the master. Is that it?
     
  4. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    Jun 14, 2010
    Location:
    US
    #6
    Changing existing passwords is completely unnecessary. Why do you claim this to be true when it isn't?

    ----------

    Yes with the exception that you can choose to keep the same site password or change to a new 1Password generated password if you wish. Your choice depending on how confident you are in being able to come up with your own memorable passwords of decent complexity.
     
  5. jekjones1558 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 27, 2010
    #7
    But I thought that the whole point was that I DON'T have to remember complex passwords with 1password because it will remember them for me. I currently have 6 or 8 passwords that are only fairly complex and use them all over the place. I know this is very poor security so that is why I need 1password. It would create complex passwords but I don't have to worry about remembering them because it will remember them for me. Or do I have it all wrong? This is why I have been afraid to use this app even though I read that it is so great.
     
  6. E.Lizardo macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    #8
    NO. you do NOT need to change any current passwords.After you enable 1 Password,the first time you log on to any site that uses a password it will ask if you want to save the log in,much as browsers do.Having 1 Password generate new passwords is completely optional and unnecessary.The advantage to 1 Password over a browser remembering for you is that they are securely protected by your master password,important if someone else gains access to your computer.

    Having said that,the passwords generated by 1Password are much more secure than the ones most people come up with,so using them certainly wouldn't hurt.

    On the iPhone it works somewhat the same.Open 1Password,enter master password(or scan fingerprint),find the site or app you need,such as your bank.I then copy the bank password to the clipboard,switch to the banking app,and paste it and go.There is also a browser in 1Password,but I don't use it.

    You can sync the desktop and 1OS app through icoud or wifi.

    It's just great,I love it.

    ----------

    It will do exactly what you are describing.just make sure they are backed up somewhere.


    *************
    interestingly,right now desktop 1password is on sale and iOS is free. I think it will fit your needs well.
     
  7. jekjones1558 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 27, 2010
    #9
    So I still need to make a list of all the complex 1password generated passwords as a backup? I currently have a list of all my passwords on Dropbox in a password protected file. So I need to keep that but with all the new passwords? Why? Does 1password sometimes not work?
     
  8. KUguardgrl13 macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #10
    I thought that was the whole point of 1Password to create the randomized passwords. Perhaps I'm wrong? Otherwise I'm not sure of the point of using it with passwords the user has already created. How can you use the master password to login to things?
     
  9. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2013
    #11
    No, you don't need to manually make a list of passwords. 1Password automatically syncs your password "vault" using any of 3 methods (Dropbox, iCloud or Wi-Fi) to other devices. So the password vault is essentially backed up to the other devices. Plus, there is a backup feature within 1Password. Just click on the "backup" command and your vault contents will be backed up on each device, separate from the Dropbox/iCould/Wi-Fi sync.

    Remember that the 1Password vault is stored locally and synced across to other devices. The vault is not stored in 1Password's servers.

    Regarding "not work[ing]", I would not expect that to happen. Even if 1Password went out of business or its servers crashed, you would still have your current local working version of 1Password on your computer and mobile devices. You have to remember your secure password to access the encrypted vault, but the app will work regardless of what happens to the 1Password company or 1Password's servers.
     
  10. infantrytrophy, Oct 18, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2014

    infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #12
    1Password does two basic things: it manages your passwords and it secures them in an encrypted vault. So there is a degree of security provided, even for simple passwords. And there is certainly a convenience factor provided for both long and random or short and non-random password management.

    The most secure way manage passwords is to allow 1Password to generate long randomized passwords, but it is entirely possible to use your own passwords within the 1Password app.


    For sensitive web sites such as bank accounts and email account access, you should use long, random passwords, unique for each account. For non-sensitive accounts such as discussion forums, simple passwords should be OK, as long as you use different password for each site. 1Password doesn't really care what type of password you use - it handles short, non-random passwords and long, randomly-generated passwords equally well.

    You would absolutely NOT want to use your "master" 1Password password to access web sites. That master password should only be used so that the 1Password app can access your encrypted, locally-stored password vault. The passwords in the vault then access the various web sites.
     
  11. KUguardgrl13 macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

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    #13
    I already use 1Password with the generated passwords. I guess I don't understand the purpose of simply using it as a vault unless it can auto login for you. Since I have Chrome remember my passwords across my Macs and my iOS apps remember them on my iPhone and iPad, I don't really need that feature. It doesn't really matter how you use it as long as it works for you. I simply explained it to OP as far as I understand it.
     
  12. jekjones1558 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 27, 2010
    #14
    OP here. Thanks to all for your patient explanations. I think I get the gist of how 1Password works and I feel comfortable proceeding. You are all to be commended for being so helpful to a stranger.
     
  13. Nolander07 macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 16, 2012
    #15
    It really is a useful app. I use it all the time. It's even better now with Touch ID and safari extension.
     
  14. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #16
    KUguard - You are correct of course, and I think that we are saying the same thing. Different people can choose to use 1PW in different ways. 1PW is certainly useful simply as a password manager for the user's own simple passwords. There are convenience features such as auto-login and storing passwords in one place.

    The web browser password managers work well and offer the convenience of password storage and auto-login. As you mentioned, Chrome works with OS X and IOS, but in addition takes this one step further (compared to Safari's Keychain) , by working across platforms (OSX and Windows). The feature lacking with web browser pw managers is the greater degree of security. Whoever has access to your web browser (anyone who picks up your phone, tablet or laptop computer) has access to your web-browser passwords. 1PW stores the passwords (and other data) in 256-bit encrypted form, so only the user with the master password can allow the vault-stored passwords to be used.

    I agree with you that a major benefit of 1PW is the randomly-generated strong passwords. There is really no reason not to use this feature.
     
  15. Abazigal macrumors 604

    Abazigal

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Location:
    Singapore
    #17
    I use 1password to manage passwords for my more sensitive accounts, like paypal. For the other less important websites, I default to iCloud keychain.

    If you are going to use 1password on your ios device, and until 1password integration with apps is more commonplace, you may want to consider using launch centre pro app to make retrieving your passwords easier.

    http://www.macstories.net/roundups/my-launch-center-pro-setup/

    And here is the code (edit where necessary).

    https://launchcenterpro.com/n95zh7

    Don't force yourself, and slowly take the time to figure it out. It's not an easy app to master, and I also let the app lay abandoned for many months until ios 8 came around and made the app less cumbersome to use (most notably, adding the ability to log in using my fingerprint).
     
  16. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    US
    #18
    Careful with generalizations. :cool:

    Consider a work PC where you're not allowed to install personally owned software and it takes an act of congress to get permission or get it officially installed. Makes it a PITA to access sites with random-gen passwords.

    Plus there are several passwords I'll use a bunch for a few days then go a while before needing them again. Far easier to use something I can remember for just typing it in, but securely stored in 1P on my phone or ipad to jog my memory when it's been a while since I last accessed that resource.
     
  17. infantrytrophy, Oct 18, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014

    infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #19
    Of course, good point!

    I'm retired, so I can personally vouch for one of the main benefits - total control over your life, including what computer (and software) you can use. :D

    __________
    Added later: Well OK, I forgot. I'm married, so I don't really have total control over my life. But my Family Commanding Officer does allow me to use 1Password ...
     
  18. eagleglen macrumors 6502a

    eagleglen

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #20
    Could someone compare the benefits of using 1Password with Apple's iCloud Keychain? I know the Keychain doesn't generate complex passwords for you, so besides that.
     
  19. 1rottenapple macrumors 65816

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    Apr 21, 2004
    #21
    Does one password remember screen name?

    I am surprised 1password for iOS is free. How do they make money?
     
  20. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    Jun 14, 2010
    Location:
    US
    #22
    1P hasn't normally been free. Also for the best experience you want the desktop version as well, and that definitely isn't free.

    ----------

    1P:
    Works with non-Apple browsers and non-Apple computers.
    Allows you to store all kinds of info not just passwords. For example passwords you might use within banking apps and so on. It won't fill them in for you but you can look them up. Also you can keep up with the special security questions/answers by putting them in as notes.
    Probably a bit more.
     
  21. infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #23
    By charging for the OS X/Windows apps and by upselling the IOS app to the Pro version with additional features.

    A very real advantage to using 1PW is the cross-device and cross-platform utility. Many or most who use the IOS or Android app would want to use the OS X or Windows app as well.
     
  22. infantrytrophy, Oct 19, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014

    infantrytrophy macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2013
    #24
    Yes, all of these reasons.

    Plus, 1PW provides additional security. All of the info in the 1PW vault (passwords, free-form notes with attachments, credit card and banking info, passport info and much more) is encrypted with 24-bit encryption. Think about it - the content of web browser password managers could potentially be used by anyone who accesses the web browser, even in a lost or stolen device. The info in 1PW is more secure; the vault closes when the screen locks or the 1PW app is closed. Then you need the full 1PW password to access the vault. Various settings (timeouts, PIN access, etc.) can be applied to make it work as you want.

    Keychain is great for non-sensitive web sites (this forum, for example). For security-sensitive sites such as bank accounts and email account access, it is better to use a more secure password manager that provides not only randomly-generated passwords but the added security described above.
     

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