Anyone here with or knows someone with asperger's syndrome?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by juanster, Jan 26, 2009.

  1. juanster macrumors 68020

    juanster

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    #1
    like the title says, i have a presentation to do and i would simply like to talk to or get to know of some people with the syndrome. I do not want to just do a presentation on what books and journals are saying but more of an everyday life with AS. If you can answer some questions or even tell me about day to day activities and how it affects you that would be great...
     
  2. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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  3. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #3
    I have Asperger's. PM any questions you like and I'll do my best to answer them.
     
  4. juanster thread starter macrumors 68020

    juanster

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    #4
    of course Lee, it's a pretty wide topic, and individual that have this syndrome are that, individuals, it is different for every one, but there are certain things that are very common, one of the most common one is that per say they are not very good at perceiving certain cues. usually body language or gestures. It is a very "low" level of autism as i understand it, but usually also are very focused on whatever it is that really interests them, so maybe they can for example be very interested on a certain topic, say the heart as an organ, when in bio class, tehya re speaking of teh heart he may be extremely interested and do certain things like raise their hand a lot, and soemtimes not being able to take cues form the proffesor trying to move on, keeps speaking of teh heart ...liek i said before it is differnet fro every individual. But it is mostly a problem with social communication. some people read everythign too literal.. some people just won t speak to others unless they know them for a very long time. stuff liek that...

    or perhaps, say something that he/she would not find offensive but it is to someone else..
     
  5. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #5
    Thanks- that's very interesting.
     
  6. juanster thread starter macrumors 68020

    juanster

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    #6
    yeah it really is, there are so many studies going on about it, some people can cope really well in a day to day basis and recently there has been a lot of talk about Albert Einstein having AS as well, and that explaining his out of the "norm" behavior yet extreme success with math and physics.. which could have been what interested him
     
  7. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #7
    That actually sounds alot like it fits. Some of histories greatest people had they been alive today would be diagnosed with one thing or the other. Just shows abnormalness can have advantages.
     
  8. Anuba macrumors 68040

    Anuba

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    #8
    I know there's a tech company in Sweden that only hires people with Asperger's, since they're extremely (obsessively) thorough and have endless patience with details.

    I'm sure I have a hint of it myself, though I've never been diagnosed. The thoroughness and obsession with detail thing certainly checks out, and the social interaction impairment as well. It's a rather exhausting chore to be around people because none of the standard, off-the-shelf social interaction comes naturally. It's like I have a secondary CPU constantly processing everything and reminding me what to do; when someone says "Hi, how are you?", it tells me "this is where you say 'fine, thanks', and don't forget the 'and you?' part at the end. Oh, and look them in the eyes while you say it because people apparently expect that". I'd honestly prefer to have some more obvious handicap that can be spotted from 50 meters away, because this one is quite subtle and flies under the radar, or registers as me being shy, having a bad day or just being a general @-hole. And when I return home from being around people I have to lie down, pant and yell "gaaaahhhh!!!!" like I just ran a marathon.

    But hey, it could be worse. I could have had Tourette's, quadriplegia or a conjoined twin. This is more on par with migraine or balding.
     
  9. apsterling macrumors 6502a

    apsterling

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    #9
    Honestly, Tourette's isn't that bad, coming from someone with it. It's just a bit of an inconvenience, and often gets you picked on by immature people. It's a disease that has lots of urban myths surrounding it, that are often overplayed.

    But in regards to the OP, I know a few people but none of them post online, they're mostly in my real life interactions (particularly one person in my chemistry class and one person in my band period)
     
  10. Anuba macrumors 68040

    Anuba

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    #10
    It comes in many shapes and sizes. I suppose the urban myths you're referring to are about involuntarily sputtering xxx-rated words, which is a fairly rare manifestation of Tourette's. But I've seen documentaries about some cases who have to, I dunno, stop and flick the same light switch 200 times everytime they walk past it, which seems like a major inconvenience.
     
  11. apsterling macrumors 6502a

    apsterling

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    #11
    Yeah, that's the urban myths I'm referencing.

    I have a form where my head nods up and down as if I were signaling yes. It's even sometimes evident in my videos while I drum, and it's a huge hindrance to a ton of things that I wish I could do without looking odd. Not so much to fit in as to just reassure myself it doesn't have control over me.

    But at any rate I've gotten crap since I was born, about how my head nods. So I'm used to it. It's the nicknames that people I don't like give me that really drive me off.

    But yeah.
     
  12. millerj123 macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    Aspergers specifically, or just on the autism spectrum? My nephew was diagnosed with Aspergers until he was almost 18, and then his doctor re-diagnosed him as high functioning autism. My oldest son is autistic, but also fairly high functioning.
     

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