Anyone running a Velociraptor 600gb in an iMac i7 2009 model?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by djtofu, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. djtofu macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    #1
    I know a VR won't be as fast as a SSD, but just want to find out if anyone is running that particular setup and what kinda temp ranges are you getting.

    Thanks!
     
  2. flipster macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    Wouldn't make much sense you can get an ssd and the fact that those 10,000 rpm drives have proven to be more unreliable and make more noise lol
     
  3. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
    #3
  4. wingzero1285 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #4
    My gaming PC had a Velociraptor 600GB and I loved having one fast traditional disk. So I put it inside of my 2010 iMac i7.


    Long Answer:

    Under extreme load, the temperature was 61-62c. Thats too hot .The fan never went over 1100RPM. I have tried connecting the temp sensor 3 different ways:

    1: Permanently modifying my original Seagate sensor to fit into the Western Digital pins on the back of the Velociraptor. If connected incorrectly, the fan ramps up to full speed. If connected correctly, the fan never went over 1100RPM, even at extreme temperatures (at least according to the S.M.A.R.T. temperature). Oddly enough this is the only temperature that I can get for the hard drive. There is a sensor that always reads 3c with any program I use. Even with the stock drive. I think it was called "HD Bay Sensor".

    2: As I read for people that did not want to short their sensor when installing an SSD, that they instead used an Optical Drive Sensor. I tried this, and it too needed to be connected to the rear pins of the Velociraptor correctly. Once again, under extreme load it did not go beyond 1100RPM.

    3: I tried to use the same transistor used for the LCD Temperature Sensor. This too had the same results as number 2 above.

    So this had lead me to 3 conclusions:

    A: Leave it stock if you don't want to spend a lot more money fooling around and potentially breaking something since it is extremely fragile inside of that computer. For example, ripping the display connector off of the logic board was not fun to solder back on. 32 tiny pins RIGHT on top of each other. Yeah that sucked.

    B: The stock drive runs cooler than a Velociraptor and offers more space and not too bad of performance.

    C: Get an SSD if you are willing to spend $300 on a 600GB Velociraptor. I stopped fooling with traditional hard drives and slapped a 240GB OCZ Vertex II. By far the best upgrade to any computer as of now. I keep all of my applications on there and set my former internal disk inside of an external firewire 800 enclosure as my home folder.

    Side observation:

    I noticed two other things. The HD fan never seemed to go over 1100RPM on my mac regardless of which disk was installed. I tried all I could to get the original Seagate hot enough to ramp that fan up. I think this might be firmware related to the disk itself or some sort of firmware on the mac and how it controls its fans related to what brand disk was originally installed or something with the S.M.A.R.T reading. Not sure, just an idea. Also, the pins that even the stock Western Digital temp sensor connect to are the same jumper pins for 1.5gbps SATA speed. Thought that was odd, although when I had the VR installed the system profiler under SATA said the speed was indeed 3gbps. Benchmarks with no sensor connected and sensor connected, yielded same results.





    Short Answer: Go SSD. Faster, quieter, way less heat.
     
  5. gabicava83 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
  6. djtofu thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    #6
    Thank you everyone for the input! Now as for getting a SSD, any particular brand I should look into or even a different controllers?
     
  7. MacHamster68, Nov 7, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2010

    MacHamster68 macrumors 68040

    MacHamster68

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    #7
    not in a 27 inch but i'm running it in my iMac core duo 1.8 and it really speeds things up , and effectively cool thanks to the icepack compare to the older WD 250 gb 7200rpm that was in it

    and originally the fans should never have to raise beyond the 1100 rpm (1200in older iMac core duo)under normal usage of the harddrive on the old core duo its set so the fan for the hardrive will start spinning faster at 65 celsius , a temp that not even the velociraptor is reaching , its stays happy 45-50 degree celsius
     
  8. wingzero1285 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #8
    Under load what temps were you getting with your VR? I was getting about 61c or so. Fans never went over 1100rpm which was disappointing....
     
  9. wingzero1285 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #9
    Sandforce controllers are the way to go. I have heard that the new gen 3 Intel ssd's will be very good also. Basically the newest and latest Sandforce or waiting for the intel and you cant get wrong. They're only going to get better, faster, more reliable, and cheaper.
     
  10. MacHamster68, Nov 9, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2010

    MacHamster68 macrumors 68040

    MacHamster68

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    #10
    under really heavy load means writing and reading multiple files at the same time over a longer period (ripping a couple dvd ) the harddrive temp went up a bit to around 54 degree and my HDD fan too never went faster then 1200 rpm (default idle setting in 2006 iMac , but should not make such a huge difference these 100rpm )
    and your 61 degree are nothing to worry about your fans will only start to kick in if the harddrive temp will go beyond 65 degree or even later in the new iMac's , if its bothering you you can always install smc fan control and speed up the hdd fan a bit
     
  11. wingzero1285 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #11

    I see. Isn't 65c a bit too hot though? I don't think I would be able to stress it that high to see if the fan acutally ramps up. I feel like the HD fan in the 27" only reads from SMART data and not this "temp sensor" (which plugs into the jumper pins). Anyone have any ideas about how it reads the HD temp and how/when the fan is told to "turn up"? Sorry to hijack this thread.
     
  12. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
    #12
    SF-2000 is coming early next year as well
     
  13. wingzero1285 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    #13
    What is the most accurate way to read temperatures on a mac? It appears that there can be varried results from temp monitor and smc fan control and whatever else is out there... I think istat. I guess installing windows and using a variety of temp reading programs on there would be a better bet?
     

Share This Page