Apple employee claims HSDPA would drain battery in an hour

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by netdog, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. netdog macrumors 603

    netdog

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #1
    My brother finally got his iPhone yesterday, and when he asked why HSDPA speeds aren't being supported yet in NYC, the Apple salesman told him that running the phone at HSDPA speeds (7.2) would drain the phone's battery in an hour or less.

    Any truth to this?
     
  2. wronski macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    #2
    No. They don't know.
     
  3. philgilder macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    the iphone supports hsdpa... its in the tech specs. i know some peoples iphone battery is bad, but it lasts longer than an hour!
     
  4. WPB2 macrumors 6502a

    WPB2

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Southeast, LA
    #4
    7.2 must have more radios in it, so it would burn more fuel (battery). Thought I would add that, considering in a vehicle more speed = more fuel. makes cents.
     
  5. Tosser macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    #5
    Except: It isn't true. Not even close.
     
  6. cantankerously macrumors regular

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    Jul 11, 2008
    #6
    HSDPA and 3G are synonymous. That Apple guy doesn't know squat.
     
  7. netdog thread starter macrumors 603

    netdog

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    London
    #7
    To be clear, when I said HSDPA, I was talking about speeds at 7.2 Mbit which, to my understanding, is the highest speed supported by the iPhone (but not by AT&T).
     
  8. benzslrpee macrumors 6502

    benzslrpee

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    #8
    unless the HSDPA is using a different chipset than whats being used for UMTS right now, there should be no difference in battery life...assuming band spectrum (850) and signal strength are the same
     
  9. sirherbert macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    #9
    3G and HSDPA are NOT synonymous; HSDPA (member of HSPA family) is known on Nokia phones as 3,5G. 3G (UMTS, baseline) allows for 384kbit/s, whereas HSDPA goes up to 14,4mbit/s

    Source: Wikipedia.
     
  10. Gandalf2008 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2008
    #10
    HSDPA is NOT equivalent to 3G!

    GSM -> EDGE -> UMTS -> HSDPA
    2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5

    UMTS (or W-CDMA), which has a maximum speed of 384Kbps, is 3G.
    HSDPA (3.6Mbps theoretical maximum velocity in first versions,
    7.2Mbps in most recent versions, that also have HSUPA)
    is often advertised as 3.5G
     
  11. phannon666 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Location:
    Bucks, UK
    #11
    I'm with the rest of the crowd on this, the guy knows nothing. I seriously doubt that it requires more power to use a HSDPA connection than it does to watch a movie on the iPhone.
     
  12. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #12
    No, it doesn't. And, Gandalf2008 is correct. HSDPA supports up to a certain speed without HSUPA being implemented.
     
  13. Gandalf2008 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2008
    #13
    Battery drain

    While I don't believe the Apple employee either, it is perfectly possible that
    HSDPA usage could drain the processor quicker than UMTS usage, if more
    processor power is needed for the HSDPA signal processing.
     
  14. hsleiman macrumors regular

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    May 30, 2008
    Location:
    Morgantown, WV
    #14
    iPhone supports up to 7.2. The issue is att has that speed limited on all their smartphones so as to not strain their network. If att were to lift it's max speed limitation, our phones would be much faster although probably not at 7.2.
     
  15. hsleiman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    Location:
    Morgantown, WV
    #15
    iPhone supports up to 7.2. The issue is att has that speed limited on all their smartphones so as to not strain their network. If att were to lift it's max speed limitation, our phones would be much faster although probably not at 7.2. The speed is limited to avoid network strain not prolong battery life.
     
  16. Gandalf2008 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2008
    #16
    Max speed on HSDPA

    Everybody should remember that 7.2Mbps is a *theoretical* maximum speed...
    probably not even attained in a laboratory under ideal circumstances.

    In the US, I use a Verizon EVDO Rev A modem, and get up to 2Mbps real
    download speeds.
    In Europe, I use a 7.2Mbps HSDPA/HSUPA modem, and haven't ever gotten
    more than 1Mbps real download speeds (and that's on various networks,
    even very close to a tower, with all "bars")
     
  17. njchris macrumors regular

    njchris

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    #17
    Dollars and cents?
     
  18. thirdeyeopen666 macrumors 6502

    thirdeyeopen666

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    #18
    Listening to Apple Store employees is something that should be done purely for entertainment purposes.
     
  19. WPB2 macrumors 6502a

    WPB2

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Southeast, LA
    #19
    sense?
     
  20. WPB2 macrumors 6502a

    WPB2

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Southeast, LA
    #20
    But they wear such professional attire, I think they do know everything.
     
  21. Tosser macrumors 68030

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    Jan 15, 2008
  22. retroneo macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    #22
    In my testing all four HSDPA networks in Australia:

    Consistently expect 1.5Mbit on Three and Telstra. Around 1Mbit but variable on Vodafone and Optus.

    It doesn't seem any faster in my speed tests on the only network that supports 14.4Mbit (Telstra). The other networks only support 3.6Mbit at this stage here (all will offer 7.2 before years end, when Telstra is offering 21Mbit).

    I haven't run speed tests in the middle of the night or outside the middle of the city, so it might be better than this for some....

    While 7.2 decoding is more complex (more power), that is offset by downloading the same information in less time (saving power).

    The iPhone is slower than a HSDPA modem plugged into a computer, but the phone is also hampered by its CPU and Flash memory. It pulls down 5Mbit on a WiFi connection that can do 17Mbit on a laptop.
     

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