iPhone X Apple Made Me Turn Off Find My iPhone So They Could Send Me A Replacement Phone

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by matty1551, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. matty1551 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    #1
    Long story short, I have an iPhone X with defective hardware (audio issues when recording video). Apple chat support offered to mail me a replacement X. I would be able to keep and use my current X until the replacement arrived.

    However, in order to set this up I'd need to TURN OFF and LEAVE OFF find my iphone. Since I'm in a bind, I reluctantly agreed but this seems really unsafe. Now, while waiting for the replacement, I'll have no way to track or wipe my phone in the event it's lost or stolen.

    Any idea why they would make you do this?
     
  2. chscag macrumors 68040

    chscag

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    Anytime I traded in an iPhone either to Apple or my carrier, the first thing they want you to do is turn off "Find My iPhone". I can only surmise that in order to set you up on the new X, the old one had to first be removed from the Find My iPhone lock.
     
  3. Banglazed, Nov 25, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018

    Banglazed macrumors demi-god

    Banglazed

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    Cupertino, CA
    #3
    FMI is a anti-theft feature. Apple requires all Apple product for any repairs or exchange or trade in or returns to have FMI turned off. Apple can denied your replacement if you failed to turn it off and charge you for the replacement device because it possible you're not the right owner if you cannot turn it off. If you get a replacement device, erase your device and mail it out. There's instruction included.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201557
     
  4. matty1551 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Jul 7, 2009
    #4
    I can totally understand turning it off right before sending it in but this rep told me I had to turn it off right then or she couldn't even set up the repair case.
     
  5. BugeyeSTI macrumors 68030

    BugeyeSTI

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    Aug 19, 2017
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    Arizona
    #5
    What’s the big deal? If you want a replacement you’ll follow there instructions...
     
  6. Five_Oh macrumors regular

    Five_Oh

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    Jan 7, 2017
    Location:
    Flyover Country, USA
    #6
    For him, the big deal is if something happens to his phone while he's waiting for the replacement.

    OP, I'm assuming this is just Apple's way of reducing the chance you will forget to turn off FMI before shipping your old device, this resulting in them denying you credit for it.

    I agree that you shouldn't have to do it.
     
  7. JPack macrumors 601

    JPack

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2017
    #7
    If you can't turn it off, it means the phone isn't yours. Pretty simple. Why would Apple proceed if the phone doesn't belong to you?
     
  8. BugeyeSTI macrumors 68030

    BugeyeSTI

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    #8
    Or as @JPack stated, it’s not your phone if you can’t turn off FMI..
     
  9. Five_Oh macrumors regular

    Five_Oh

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    #9
    I guess the "leave it off" portion is the problem.
     
  10. JPack macrumors 601

    JPack

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    #10

    The intention is to minimize the chance of OP selling or gifting the defective phone prior to receiving the replacement.
     
  11. Five_Oh macrumors regular

    Five_Oh

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    #11
    Agreed. But it is also risky, as the OP stated. What if his phone was lost or stolen while waiting for the replacement?

    I think it should just be on the individual to make sure FMI is disabled before sending it in. I believe Apple charges for the new phone until they receive the old one anyway.
     
  12. JPack macrumors 601

    JPack

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2017
    #12
    I agree it's slightly risky for the OP but I suppose it's the cost of doing a warranty replacement.

    The credit card authorization can be placed on a fraudulently obtained card. In that scenario, Apple can blacklist the replacement device, but they are still out roughly $300 for the cost of the hardware.
     
  13. Hieveryone macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    Apr 11, 2014
    #13
    If I remember right I think I had a similar situation. But I just turned it off.
     
  14. burgman macrumors 68000

    burgman

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    #14
    This is a good example of living in fear over what-if’s. If it’s that big of a problem shut the phone off and put it in a safe or safety deposit box until the replacement arrives in couple of days.
     
  15. Five_Oh macrumors regular

    Five_Oh

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    #15
    Most people don't have car accidents frequently, but I bet they wouldn't be willing to drop coverage for a few days.

    And it's not "a big problem". It's just an added risk that some feel is unnecessary.

    YMMV
     
  16. Shanghaichica macrumors G4

    Shanghaichica

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    Location:
    UK
    #16
    Yes you have to turn it off otherwise Apple won’t be able to gain access to the phone when you send it back to them. They’ve sent you a replacement but they still want to be able fix your phone and sell it on as refurbished or use it to replace someone else’s phone when it’s faulty.
     
  17. JPack macrumors 601

    JPack

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    Mar 27, 2017
    #17
    Of course Apple can remove Activation Lock. Apple will even remove the lock for owners who have lost their password but can provide proof of purchase. I've explained the real reasoning above.
     
  18. Relentless Power macrumors Penryn

    Relentless Power

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    Jul 12, 2016
    #18
    That’s not feasible for everybody, because they may have to use that defective device until the new/replacement phone arrives. For example, if the defective phone display is ‘Yellow’, or one of the speakers does not work, the phone itself is still functional, but they don’t have a back up phone to use just to put away the defective phone in a safety deposit box.
     
  19. Cowboy1629 macrumors 6502

    Cowboy1629

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    Sep 20, 2012
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    Indiana
    #19
    Just turn it back on until the new one arrives. Before sending the defective one back turn it off. That’s what I did with an iPad, no problem.
     
  20. nostresshere macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    #20
    Wow - how many times do people here actually have their phone stolen or lost?

    I love the findmyiphone... but if I had to turn it off for a week... no big deal at all. Bang. Done!
     
  21. Phone Junky macrumors 65816

    Phone Junky

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    Oct 29, 2011
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    Sunshine State
    #21
    In the grand scheme of things, is it really that big of a deal to turn it off for a couple of days?
     
  22. jtrue28 macrumors 6502a

    jtrue28

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    Apr 10, 2015
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    #22
    Just turn it back on after they confirm your new phone order. JFC.
     
  23. Neo1975 macrumors 6502

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    May 11, 2015
    #23
    Turn it back on, I did. Just remember to turn it back off when you return it.
     
  24. C DM macrumors Sandy Bridge

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #24
    https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...me-a-replacement-phone.2157014/#post-26866668
     

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35 November 25, 2018