Apple releases broadband tuner 1.0


liketom

macrumors 601
Apr 8, 2004
4,167
23
Lincoln,UK
thats cool , but when i downloaded it it went straight into the installer? i thought 10.4 always had that download pop up?

but cool anyway
 

crazzyeddie

macrumors 68030
Dec 7, 2002
2,790
0
Florida, USA
liketom said:
thats cool , but when i downloaded it it went straight into the installer? i thought 10.4 always had that download pop up?

but cool anyway
Same here. It must be one of those net-enabled DiskImages with some sort of Apple-trusted key.... sounds sorta like M$.
 

GKThursday

macrumors regular
May 25, 2005
107
10
Ditto,
I did get a warning as it started installing, but it's a bit late at that point.
Yi+
Thursday
 

thejadedmonkey

macrumors 604
May 28, 2005
7,980
531
Pennsylvania
crazzyeddie said:
Same here. It must be one of those net-enabled DiskImages with some sort of Apple-trusted key.... sounds sorta like M$.
This is where I spaz. Please, never ever ever ever compare Apple to M$ (No matter how similar they are :p )
 

ITASOR

macrumors 601
Mar 20, 2005
4,400
3
I'm hesitant to install this because my internet it working surprisingly well lately and I have a feeling this will end my happiness. Besides, how much faster can it make it?
 

treblah

macrumors 65816
Oct 28, 2003
1,285
0
29680
liketom said:
thats cool , but when i downloaded it it went straight into the installer? i thought 10.4 always had that download pop up?

but cool anyway
I'm guessing you have 'Open safe files automatically' checked?
 

samh004

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2004
2,211
85
Australia
bluebomberman said:
Where does it install to exactly? I don't see how you uninstall it...
It mentions:

There is an optional uninstaller that can be used to restore the settings that were in effect at the time just before the system parameters were changed.

So I would assume you just launch it again and select uninstall if need be.
 

bluebomberman

macrumors 6502a
Jan 9, 2005
919
0
Queens, NYC
samh004 said:
It mentions:

There is an optional uninstaller that can be used to restore the settings that were in effect at the time just before the system parameters were changed.

So I would assume you just launch it again and select uninstall if need be.
Okay, not entirely intuitive to launch the installer to uninstall it...but your answer sounds plausible enough.

Internet's working, at least, so I'll stick with it.
 

dejo

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 2, 2004
15,725
447
The Centennial State
Does anyone know if this will have much effect on the following setup: Mac to Airport Base Station via Airport Extreme, Base Station to cable modem via cat-5, cable modem to... well, you know the rest?
 

DavidLeblond

macrumors 68020
Jan 6, 2004
2,198
286
Raleigh, NC
dejo said:
Does anyone know if this will have much effect on the following setup: Mac to Airport Base Station via Airport Extreme, Base Station to cable modem via cat-5, cable modem to... well, you know the rest?
Unless you have one bitchin' cable connection, I'm guessing no. I'm not touching this one... says for very fast connections (5Mbps or greater) and thats not me.
 

xStep

macrumors 68000
Jan 28, 2003
1,999
96
Less lost in L.A.
Will it Help Home Networks

Here is a short (Linux) tutorial about this very subject...
http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005/11/17/tcp_tuning.html

How I understood it was; when you have a very high speed network connection and the time for the packets to get from your box to the destination is long, your better off sending bigger chunks of data. It sounded to me part of the issue was that the client was waiting for acknowledgments that the packets were received correctly, before sending more data. If your sending more data per packet, your waiting on fewer receipt notices.

So, it doesn't sound like this will help your internal network which has high bandwidth and very low latency.

I wonder what happens when this goes through a router. Does the router have to be tuned too?
 

shamino

macrumors 68040
Jan 7, 2004
3,386
130
Purcellville, VA
According to the Apple page, it is meant for people with high-speed (5M or faster) links with high-latency. In other words, satellite users.

People using satellite broadband often have problems with internet access, because of the high latency, relative to the bandwidth. You've always been able to hack around this by tweaking some system parameters (increasing the size of the TCP buffers). This application simple performs the tweak for you (increasing the send-buffer to 128K and the receive buffer to 350K) using an Apple-supported installer.

It doesn't do anything you couldn't do yourself, but the self-contained installer should (hopefully) prevent people from making mistakes that might cripple their networking capabilities.
 

iMeowbot

macrumors G3
Aug 30, 2003
8,643
0
mduser63 said:
I think this is Tiger only. Tried to install it on my Power Mac (running Panther) and it said that it couldn't be installed.
Yep. Nothing wrong with your system, 10.4 is in the system requirements. You can, however, still get the same effect by using the sysctl command from the terminal.
 

shamino

macrumors 68040
Jan 7, 2004
3,386
130
Purcellville, VA
DavidLeblond said:
Unless you have one bitchin' cable connection, I'm guessing no. I'm not touching this one... says for very fast connections (5Mbps or greater) and thats not me.
Unless you've got a seriously crippled ISP, only satellite users will need this.

All other kinds of high-speed connections (like cable modems and leased lines) usually have very low latency.

The problem with satellite is that the speed of light can't be increased. A geostationary satellite (which is what you must use if your antenna doesn't have elaborate controls to follow it across the sky) must be at an altitude of about 36,000km. Light moves at about 300,000km/s, so it takes light about 0.12s to get to the satellite. Multiply that by 4 (you to the satellite, satellite to the destination, reply from the destination to the satellite, reply from the satellite to you) and you get about a one-half second (0.48s) round-trip delay.

So, when TCP sends a packet, it will be at least half a second before the ACK comes back from the computer on the other end. When you've got a high speed link, a LOT of traffic can arrive (or be sent) during that half-second. (at 5Mbps, a half-second is 2.5Mb or 320KB.) This is enough to easily overflow your buffers, causing TCP's congestion control to kick in, drastically slowing down the entire connection.

The workaround is to increase the buffers enough so that they don't fill up before the ACK packets arrive. This way, everything keeps on streaming nicely, without annoying slowdowns. Apple's choice of 350K for the receive buffer covers the estimated 320K burst, plus a little slack space.