Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads for Police

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Southern Dad, Sep 17, 2014.

  1. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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  2. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #2
    I think this is something we all can agree on.

    BL.
     
  3. Southern Dad thread starter macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #3
    I believe that you are right. Who will pass out the Rainbow Stew and Free Bubble Up. This doesn't happen often.
     
  4. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #4
    If it gets confiscated and you don't get arrested you can totally wipe them remotely now can't you?
     
  5. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #5
    Yes. But on the other side of that coin, you can exercise your 4th amendment right to be free of illegal search and seizures, as the police are required to get a warrant to search your phone.

    Prior to this, they were able to get around it, by asking Apple to unlock it for them instead of getting the warrant. Legal, but highly unethical and immoral.

    BL.
     
  6. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #6
    Oh i see.
     
  7. Southern Dad thread starter macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #7
    No. If they physically turn the iPhone off, you can't wipe it.
     
  8. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #8
    They have to unlock it to turn it off though don't they?
     
  9. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #9
    No
     
  10. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #10
    That brings up an interesting question.

    SD, put on your detective hat.

    Would the police turning off a phone (if they have the ability to) be considered to be evidence tampering?

    Also, if you agree with what you've posted in the OP, yet are put in the position to confiscate someone's phone to later go through (with or without a warrant), as a LEO, how would you resolve the conflict of interest?

    BL.
     
  11. Southern Dad thread starter macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #11
    The police can use something called a Faraday bag to protect the phone from receiving signals to wipe itself. I don't believe that holding the off button and swiping would be tampering with evidence because the phone itself isn't the evidence but the data to which it contains.

    I don't believe the police should go through the phone without a warrant or permission.
     
  12. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #12
    I am not SD, but I don’t think that it would constitute evidence tampering since you are not altering data that is on the device itself. The courts are usually more concerned with the data and not the device unless you are looking at specific aspects of the device itself (such as how the cell antenna connects to a tower and where, or GPS locations), but powering off the device is considered OK. It’s helpful when this is disclosed by the evidence handling tech or the cops. Given how things like computers and the such are stored for given periods of time that exceed battery life, I would think that such things are seen as normal.
     
  13. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #13
    I thought when you use a lock code that the iPhone is encrypted and impossible to unlock without the password.
     
  14. EvilQueen macrumors 6502

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    #14
    Yea, I would imagine that remotely wiping the phone would be the evidence tampering, not the police simply turning it off. How is that tampering with evidence?


    But like you said, a faraday bag would would work also.
     
  15. impulse462 Suspended

    impulse462

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    #15
    I don't believe them. All these companies denied stuff when Snowden documents proved all of them complied one way or the other. I don't believe apple at all.
     

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