Archaeological Discovery, Amphipolis, N.Greece | New Sculptures Found Further In

needfx

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A very exciting archaeological tomb has been unearthed, estimated dating as back as 325bc-300bc, and believed to have been designed by 'legendary' architect Dinokrates, closely affiliated to Alexander The Great.

The size alone of the tomb is impressive. A whopping 500sq.m./5382sq.ft. and 25m/270ft tall, is the biggest in the Balkan area. Who, or what, is inside the tomb is not known yet as they have not actually made it in yet. The shear size of it suggests someone of dynastic standing and extended family. Of course there is a high probability of tomb raiding across the millennia, which can only mean artifacts & information lost in eternity.

This was discovered in Northern Greece, in an area called Amfipolis, which was the main nautical base of Alexander's dynasty. That was also the embarkation point of his campaign to Asia Minor, NE Africa and into Asia.

The tomb's entry is made of marble from Thasos, and the entrance was built up with plinths. Once they were removed, they discovered the entrance was 'guarded' by two sphinxes, placed opposite and facing each other. Unfortunately, their heads are missing, so staring contests have been off the table for quite some time.

They need at least 2 or 3 more weeks to enter the tomb.

Even though I was never really fond of Alexander the Great and his blood/enlightenment endeavor, I am getting goosebumps at the prospect of this being his final resting place. I sincerely hope it does not become a cheap marketing trick nicely wrapped around wishful thinking from our side to attract tourism, but as a find, it's of titanic magnitude.

here's also a link I found in The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/aug/12/archaeologists-greece-tomb-alexander-great

There are not many pictures in circulation yet, as the project is still under wraps and heavily guarded against looting and raiding. We have a bad tracking score on that front too.
 
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CrickettGrrrl

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Feb 10, 2012
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Thanks for posting this --plus the photos with both sphinxes --I've only seen the right side until now. I had the following pictures open on my desktop all day Saturday. I read that the Lion of Amfipolis is believed to have originally sat on a pediment above the entrance. --And I can't believe how incredibly perfect and new the dressed marble perimeter wall looks. Had a good time imagining the original path or landscaping above it.
:)




 

Huntn

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That marble/stone appears to be in great condition. How does it end up buried under 10' of dirt, because it was originally built under ground? Or because it was built into the side of a hill? I ask because those lips on top of wall look like something that would be above ground.
 

LadyX

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Mar 4, 2012
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New Epic Archaeological Discovery in Greece still in the process of unraveling.

I read this in the news this morning! A very fascinating discovery. Thank you for posting.
 

needfx

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At last, both the sphinxes are revealed.

Current height is 1.45m without the heads, with heads is estimated at approx. 2m.

Torsos are finely crafted and reflect the plasticity and the detailed work of the sculptors of the last quarter of the 4th century. Wing parts have also been retrieved, allowing their full reconstruction. It is also believed that both the Lion of Amfipolis and the two sphinxes were made by the same sculptor.

Work is ongoing, will keep you posted.
 
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monokakata

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That marble/stone appears to be in great condition. How does it end up buried under 10' of dirt, because it was originally built under ground? Or because it was built into the side of a hill? I ask because those lips on top of wall look like something that would be above ground.
Good question, and one my archaeology students always asked.

No, it wouldn't have been built underground. But over thousands of years, silt, dirt, sand, rubble, all sorts of detritus build up. Typically, buildings are knocked down and then rebuilt in the same place. This raises the ground level.

Bottom line is that there are many natural and human processes that raise ground level and thus bury even large structures.

And remember we're talking about considerable time depth, also.

If the people living around structures such as this temple took care that it not be buried, it wouldn't be. But almost always, what we find is that people don't seem to have cared very much about old buildings and thus they get covered over.

And a good thing, too, because burial preserves things quite nicely.
 

needfx

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update

all findings are being covered to be protected from heat, UV radiation, prying eyes & telescopic lenses :(

there's a growing number of visitors in the surrounding area trying to get a glimpse of the find, while a large police force is deterring anyone getting close.
 

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JHUFrank

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Apr 16, 2010
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Absolutely amazing! This is as exciting as the recovery of the Riace Bronzes. Huge discovery no matter who is in there.