Are SSD upgrades for MBP ridiculously expensive? (or is it just me?)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by theclowning, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. theclowning macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #1
    If you can get a MBA with a 256G SSD for $1,599, why is an SSD upgrade for a MBP $750? It seems like Apple is taking advantage of the consumers who can and will pay for the upgrades available in the MBP line. By offering this very desirable drive in an affordable MBA, they're kind of admitting to us all that they don't have to charge that much for them ... I think they should lower the price of the upgrade for the already very expensive MBPs... Am I crazy?
     
  2. grahamnp macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    #2
    This is what they do. Financially, it is almost always the better option to go out and find your own upgrades. All manufacturers are guilty of this to some extent but Apple is the worst.
     
  3. theclowning thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2009
    #3
    Are you able to replace a HDD with an SDD? I thought once a mac was built with a certain kind of drive you had to stick with it (obviously being able to upgrade the same type of drive to get more capacity).
     
  4. aimbdd macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    East Cost
    #4
    No you don't have to stick with one kind of drive? They both use the same interface.
     
  5. Jaro65 macrumors 68040

    Jaro65

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #5
    It is really easy to swap an HD for SSD, upgrade your RAM, or even remove the SuperDrive and put in a second HD/SSD in the MBP's with unibody enclosures (e.g. all recent Apple laptops).
     
  6. WelshBluebird macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #6
    I'm getting a macbook pro around xmas time and am thinking of doing this.
    To benefit from an SSD, is it enough for the OS and applications to be stored on it, and all my data to be on the HDD? Also, with external DVD drives, are they powered over USB, or do they need a seperate power source?
     
  7. Jaro65 macrumors 68040

    Jaro65

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #7
    Yes to the first question.

    As far as the second question goes: It depends. Some drives require AC adapters, but there are plenty that are quite compact and draw power from the USB port.
     
  8. WelshBluebird macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #8
    What about the superdrive? Would be nice to be able to quickly replace that with an SSD, and put the drive in an external case.

    I was totally against removing the drive, but after seeing the difference an SSD can make, it doesn't matter that much lol.
     
  9. Auzburner macrumors 65816

    Auzburner

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2008
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY - USA
    #9
    I bought my MacBook Pro this summer and made sure to get the SSD. It's by far the best thing I could have done to the computer. Very stable, extremely fast and power efficient. Search around on YouTube for the SSD HDD comparison videos to see some examples of the improvements.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odSSI_9KAkI

    This is probably one of the best video's because the salesperson also give you a little extra information on SSD's in general. Convinced me to get one, I just bought the SSD elsewhere. I highly recommend the RealSSD though.
     
  10. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #10
    lol.

    You do realize that the drive used in the MBA is a very different solution then the ones used in the MBP, right?

    The SSD solutions of one vendor will can and will be much different than another vendor, or within the same vendor across different product lines. One must pay attention to the type of memeory, the implementation, firmware, etc.

    The controller used in the MBA's SSD isn't exactly a speed king. Actually, it's relatievely slow.

    Conversly, The SSD in the MBP that comes factory from Apple, while not the fastest on the block, is certianly speedy.
     
  11. grahamnp macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    #11
    That is not true. The SSD shipped in the MBPs is one of the slowest on the market, it is by no means speedy.
     
  12. gianly1985 macrumors 6502a

    gianly1985

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    #12
    They're both slow compared to the "champions" (Intel Postville and soon Postville Refresh, SF1200-based SSDs like OCZ Vertex2 and OWC units, Micron RealSSD C300), still they will "feel" blazing fast to the average user and stuff will just pop open nearly instantly. Them being covered by apple warranty is a nice benefit, too.

    Between the 2, the SSD in the new MBAs looks a bit faster and it looks like the firmware of the toshiba controller has been fined tuned to speed up the boot of OSX. (in fact, the 13" MBP + a fast SF1200-based SSD in the anandtech review booted SLOWER than the MBA, thanks to the firmware optimizations toward OSX of the apple-provided SSD in the MBA).
     
  13. shyam09 macrumors 68000

    shyam09

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    #13
    in the beginning i was planning to just buy apple's SSD, because im not too techie and i dont want to screw up my new MBP ( that i will buy soon!)
    but then i decided against it, and i decided to wait until prices dropped and see if its effective and all, then upgrade it.

    so just buy the basic config of MBP and then install the SSD yourself..
    more for less thats the way to roll!
     
  14. psychsplash macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    #14
    with the guides from ifixit.com and even the apple macbook pro manual, its not a difficult job. I changed mine over last night.
     

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