At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Jun 6, 2017.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #1
  2. ibookg409 Suspended

    ibookg409

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    #2
  3. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    AFTER the sentence, too many are back within days.
     
  4. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

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    #4
    Weren't you in Vacaville or Folsom?

    After I retired I tried a get rich quick scheme and spent a few lovely summers overlooking Pelican Bay.
     
  5. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    hell no, I am in the I>E.
     
  6. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

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    #6
    Is that 909 / CIW by chance? Good placement, score!!
     
  7. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    yes it is, CIW???? got my CCW if that is what you meant :D
     
  8. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

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  9. VulchR macrumors 68020

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  10. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    It's interesting that when they cut the number of inmates, they obviously do it by early release of people considered less likely to become repeat offenders, less likely to commit grave offenses. So... they end up retaining the ones who are more dangerous and who therefore may need more looking after while still in the slam.

    So then they keep the more experienced corrections officers (so they don't get played by inmates know every trick in the book), probably pay them more, and possibly maintain a higher count of officers to inmates overall than was the average before the cutback. Weird how the true costs of incarceration of the really bad guys finally come to light. It's expensive to babysit stone murderers.

    I read somewhere that we do have too many people in state prisions just because of the way the money works. If you make a more severe charge the guy goes to prison and the state picks up the tab. If you charge lesser offense the county jail is the recipient of the proven guilty and the county pays the freight... So county budget directors are not into that, so... the county prosecutor throws the book at the guy to be able to put him on a bus to the state pen.

    What that could mean when it backfires and a not-guilty verdict ensues, is... we have guys on the street who should be in a county slam. Say a domestic violence case. Attempted murder? Not guilty. Walks free of a state charge and goes looking for that bee wife pressed the charge to begin with. Assault? He'd not be back home beating up his wife again quite yet. He'd likely be doing county time with supervised parole.

    Lot of stuff like that, that I never really thought about much before, seems to point to the almighty dollar driving a lot of what we like to think of as due process. A lot more than I had realized.
     
  11. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    The violent ones we can send over to the ME to fight our wars. Non-violent can be case by case and see what help we can get them, if at all, and work on getting people out sooner who can be productive citizens.
     
  12. Zenithal macrumors 603

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  13. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    It's probably unconstitutional. I think California has it about right. Look at the change in the picture, point out where the expense is, then try to see what you can do on the preventive side to keep more of those high-cost hign-need ones from ending up in there to begin with. Root causes and prevention are things legislators don't usually want to hear about trying to address. But, at $75k a pop annually for a lifer, that's almost real money, so someone should be able to put some Keynote presentations together and sell in some prevention efforts.

    We know more about what makes people tick every year, seems to me. So we know more about a 25 year old at risk for comitting homicide than we did about the lifer who's in there now at age 60 for offing someone when he was 25. Let's see what it takes to get the murder rate down. Oh wait,,, we already did that. Good on us. Now if we only knew all the reasons for that (and agreed on them) we'd be in good shape.
     
  14. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    #14
    How so? You were given a choice between jail or having the charges waived and expunged from your record for serving your country, presuming you passed basic.

    Fact of the matter is, people who kill or maim others suffer from some form of psychological issue or they came from a broken home that allowed them to get mixed into the wrong crowds.
     
  15. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #15
    I thought you meant shipping murderers to go fight wars. The Dirty Dozen was a great flick but wasn't it fiction?
     
  16. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    #16
    That's kind of how it was done. Mind you it's something I've read about and I'm not sure when the practice was stopped or if it has. It was a good movie, but it had some flawed script and the ogre-ish fella has always creeped me out. Specifically the scene where he tries to rape a woman or knifes one in the stomach and he's shot by the others.
     
  17. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    You just reminded me why I don't rewatch it, which... after my post, I was wondering about.

    EDIT: I think my ex sister in law joined the AF to dodge a stint in county jail.
     

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