At "English Only" hearing, House Representative Gives Speech in Spanish

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by bradl, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #1
    And good for him. While I agree that if you are going to move or immigrate here to at least know the language, but we don't need a bill passed stating what is already the de facto language of the US Government. Plus, this has the ability to kill ESL and deter non-English speaking people from participating in things like elections because they don't know the language.

    This has the potential to be very bad.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way...rep-conyers-delivers-his-statement-in-spanish

    BL.
     
  2. AhmedFaisal Guest

    #2
    In the long run, a country can not exist without a common language.
     
  3. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #3
    Tell that to Canada.
     
  4. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #4
    Belgium has three official languages (French, Dutch and German).

    EDIT: More on point, I think it's obvious that English is the de facto language in the US and we have greater political and economic concerns that should be addressed at this time.
     
  5. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #5
    Sorry dude. That statement is simply false.

    Please take a look at the list of nations that are multilingual.

    There are many of them. And many have been around for "the long run".
     
  6. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #6
    I work with 3 guys from India, two of them are from the same part of the country and occasionally speak to each other in their native language, and the third is from another part of the country. When the other two were conversing in their native language, I asked the other one if he understood what they were saying. He said "I understand it as well as you do".

    Seems like India is doing okay for a country with multiple languages.
     
  7. AhmedFaisal Guest

    #7
    Ahh yes, ask someone from Quebec how much they consider themselves part of Canada.

    Yes, Belgium, the country that didn't have a government for more than a year and is on the verge of disintegrating into two states.

    Really? Long run? Also look at how.

    Yeah? Really? Not all unrest in India is related to religion, much of it is also related to regional origin.
     
  8. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #8
    So, basically, your point is that it can't work... except for all the places that it does.
     
  9. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #9
    What exactly is the existential threat to not having it decreed on a paper somewhere what the official language is?
     
  10. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #10
    A common language is fantastically useful, but these laws often require English-only to the detriment of people who are served by government agencies. This won't change the reality of English usage on the ground, which is wide and deep in the country and only recent immigrants have trouble using English when necessary.
     
  11. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #11
    Please elaborate.
     
  12. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #12
    Canada has official languages. Government docs are not provided in Spanish and you must translate everything for immigration at your own cost.
     
  13. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #13
    I don't see anything wrong with having people translate government documents. It could employ a few people. Does anybody know how the U.S. government handles this kind of thing?

    Edit: It looks like it's contracted out. I guess it does employ a few people ...

     
  14. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #14
    Aren't you originally German? I could not get a single person in Berlin to speak German with me. They were too thrilled to try out their English, which was far better than my own.
     
  15. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #15
    I always feel ashamed talking to International Students, even though their accent is thick they still speak better English than I do. D:
     
  16. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #16
    I know! I just wanted to at least try to speak German, but was never given the chance. Even my bed and breakfast guy would only speak English. :(
     
  17. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #17
    I had that same experience when I went to France, especially since I was a foreign exchange student. Five years of learning French, and all they wanted me to do was speak English to them. And barring the accent, their English was better than everyone I knew at the time, and that was in the early 90s.

    I'll see you Belgium and raise you Switzerland with 3, Luxembourg with 4, and South Africa with 11 (yes, 11 official languages). Each of those countries having been around just as long if not longer than ours.

    In short, your claim, like this bill, is fruitless and falls flat.

    BL.
     
  18. lannisters4life macrumors 6502

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    #18
    If you mean official language, like the article, then you're simply mistaken, unless your definition of long run is indeed so long as to have no historical precedent, and then you are simply imaginative.
     
  19. Andeavor macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2010
    #19
    Switzerland has been doing very well for over 700 with 4 official languages, thank you very much. In fact, its national anthem is officially sung in all four languages. Funnily enough, nobody ever knows the words to it.

    English is a very popular language in continental Europe despite hating on the US or making fun of the British monarchy (even the French like it but they'll never admit it), in fact due to so many immigrants Swiss schools offer bilingual or even English-only schools. Sometimes, when I go shopping, I feel like I'm anywhere but home. I don't know if it's a good thing, but if you really want to learn the local language, you have to demand from us to speak in our native tongue, we're too courteous in that regard.
     
  20. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #20
    When I was in Paris people turned their nose up at me until I said Bonjour or said I was from New Zealand.

    It was a little bit odd, a lot of girls thought it was cute when a Kiwi tried to put on a French accent.
     
  21. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #21
    They're all hot and bothered to make English as the official language and yet half of Americans read (English) at the eighth-grade level or lower*. Does it really matter?

    * Source
     
  22. Queso macrumors G4

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    Mar 4, 2006
    #22
    Ever heard of a little place called China? I believe it's been around a while.

    Considering much of the USA is really North Mexico I really can't understand why anyone would attempt to bypass Spanish as an official language. Why not have both? Even here in the UK we have three official languages (English, Welsh, Gaelic), and somehow the sky does not fall.
     
  23. ThisIsNotMe macrumors 68000

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    #23
    Did you even read you own link? (No, you didn't)
     
  24. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #24
    In China, the official language is the Bejing dialect of Mandarin, so there is a standard form of Chinese that's used for official communication. So, there is a national language.

    Yeah, I don't see what problem creating an official language in the U.S. solves. Almost all communication is done in English with special sections in Spanish (or occasionally French).

    English is a 900-pound linguistic gorilla, so I don't understand all the hew and cry when some document or sign is also in Spanish. If Spanish started replacing English (beyond a few signs and restaurant menus) than this might be more meaningful.
     
  25. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #25
    That page I linked to listed numerous countries and cities with a variety of different standards regarding this issue.

    And you found one (you might even find more if you looked hard enough) on that long, long list that didn't quite fit.

    What do you think that signifies?
     

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