Aus Government to record your email, web history, outlaw encryption, and even more

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by gladoscc, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. gladoscc macrumors 6502

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    Jul 13, 2011
    #1
    Three bullet points:

    > The Australian Government will get unlimited access to your email, your facebook, text messages, your browsing history and more without a warrant or any oversight if you're in Australia.

    > Encryption will be effectively outlawed. The ASIO has the power to ask for decryption passwords, and it will be a crime to not hand over your password or decrypt or disobey.

    > The ASIO and officers have legal immunity. They will not be liable, civil or criminal. They can do whatever they want and there is nothing you will be able to do about it. Ex snooping everything you do online? They have legal/criminal/civil immunity.

    Status
    Both the Liberals and Labor (the 2 major parties in Australia) supports this police state bill.

    More Information
    http://www.thepunch.com.au/articles/youve-got-mail-asio-wants-to-read-it-all-of-it/#item9004
    http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/blogs...the-keys-to-your-computer-20120719-22b8p.html
    http://www.communityrun.org/petitio...access-to-your-digital-life-with-no-liability
     
  2. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

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    #2
    and I'm sure that is just a field test before it get rolled out to other "free" countries like US, in EU, Japan.
    The "good thing" our governments can stop requesting North Korea and China to get the same level of freedom we have; would be very similar. on a very low level :mad:
     
  3. sk1wbw Suspended

    sk1wbw

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    #3
    Wow, you could have so much fun with that. Make every other word "**** Aus" and "bomb" just to drive the analysts insane. :)
     
  4. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

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    #4
    the next version of the law will make it a crime to irritate the statistics ...

    but I would be happy to forward them all the spam I get
     
  5. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #5
    Sums up my feelings quite nicely.
     
  6. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #6
    As long as they keep it on their side of the Tasman. I'm sure that it won't take too long for ways to circumvent the monitoring to be on the net.

    KGB;)
     
  7. Cox Orange macrumors 68000

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    #7
    is this an implementation of a EU law or was it entirely an idea of the austrian government?
     
  8. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #8
    I don't think the EU has a lot to do with it. It's Australian as in Kangaroo, not Austrian as in Tyrolean hats with little feathers.

    KGB:rolleyes:
     
  9. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #9
    And let us not even mention Adolph. :eek:
     
  10. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #10
    OK John, I won't. As mute as a Fawlty clip I shall be.
    KGB:D
     
  11. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #11
    Um, I'm not as worried as you. Type into Wikipedia "Australia Charter of Rights" and you get back "The page "Australia charter of rights" does not exist." I did some other, very quick, research and can't find any other references to an Australian Charter of Rights besides Wikipedia... So... unless something has changed recently, unlike most other developed countries Australians don't have any statutory protections against government snooping.

    If I really wanted to get something flaming here, I would ask if New Zealand had a Charter of Rights? :)
     
  12. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #12
  13. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #13
    EU really do you believe that?
    Do you write for the Daily Mail?
     
  14. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

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  15. LostSoul80 macrumors 68020

    LostSoul80

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  16. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

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    #16
    Ah, my bad. So AUS is already down to level of NK and China (and others). Is at his because of the history of AUS ? :rolleyes:
     
  17. Cox Orange, Jul 22, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2012

    Cox Orange macrumors 68000

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    #17
    Sorry, I somehow overlooked the word "Australian". I didn't want to be sensationalist by any degree, but everything is possible. While the EU saves its inhabitants for some ridiculous things other countries have to live with, if certain lobbyists are insistent enough strange things can happen, though.

    @Grey Beard: what do you mean by the acronym KGB? (that leads to misinterpretation, too :D)
     
  18. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #18
    He's the King of his small territory, very small actually, almost miniscule. :D
     
  19. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #19
    I am not an international relations expert. But here is my opinion. Canada, NZ, and other Commonwealth members tend to have adopted their Charters of of Rights in the 1980s and later. I think this is because many of these nations have been devolving from British rule incrementally. Citizens of these nations used to be covered by the same rights as British citizens (in theory if not in practice) since the court of last appeal was the British Privy Council (or House of Lords, I forget).

    So, these nations have (nearly) become totally independent from the UK, and the protections (from the British Crown) that their citizens used to enjoy needed to be recreated at home, and that has taken some time. In Australia's case - I hypothesize - they are still debating what their Charter should protect. As a Federalized Nation, that becomes more difficult since a Charter is going to be dealing with both matters of the Federal as well as State/Territorial jurisdiction.

    That's just my theory....
     
  20. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

    Grey Beard

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    #20
    Thank you iJohnHenry of the miniscule mind for answering on my behalf.
    My given name is Kevin and my signature is Grey Beard. It used to be;
    Kevin, aka
    Grey Beard
    and this has been condensed to KGB. I hope that this satisfies your curiosity. Oh and the small territory that iJH alluded to is New Zealand, also referenced in the side panel as the Antipodes.

    KGB:rolleyes:
     
  21. glocke12 macrumors 6502a

    glocke12

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    #21
    So why do the lefties and libs here have an issue with this? If you all have nothing to hide you have nothing to worry about...
     
  22. Andeavor macrumors 6502

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    #22
    This isn't a left/right issue, it's intrusion of privacy on a fascist level. Remember the Nazi regime...?
     
  23. glocke12 macrumors 6502a

    glocke12

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    #23
    I remember the Nazi regime imposed severe limitations on firearms ownership, but....to use the same rationale the gun grabbers on here like to use (that it is a matter of public safety):

    This will make you safer as the gov't will know what everyone is doing on the internet and talking about...

    The only ones who will have anything to fear are those who are talking about things they shouldn't, or are looking at the things on the internet they should not be looking at.

    You don't need privacy, especially if it will interfere with public safety. Besides the gov't does not care that you are looking at midget-clown porn, they only care if you are looking up to how to build a b*_mb.

    I feel safer already.
     
  24. MorphingDragon, Jul 23, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2012

    MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #24
    Kevin...

    Steeve...

    Kevin...

    Steeve...

    [​IMG]
     
  25. Andeavor macrumors 6502

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    #25
    False sense of safety rather. (And why censor the word 'bomb'?)

    I don't have anything to hide either but I don't want the government to use my expression of thoughts against me.

    The problem with that kind of surveillance is that some people (in power) will abuse that right to incriminate targeted people, i.e. immigrants or religious people, and as case after case will occur, people will start to live in fear to even speak their mind - especially online.

    What if I wanted to know how to build a bomb, just out of curiosity or because I'm writing a book or a script where a character is building a bomb? Can the police then storm my place and arrest me? It's a flawed procedure and will cost the government - and ultimately the taxpayer - too much money to run after every potential suspect.

    You might not see it right now, but policing the internet on that scale is getting close to mind control. We use the internet on a daily basis to exchange thoughts. Take this forum for example. We all have our thoughts and opinions on things, some are more open-minded, others tend to the extreme. Now imagine every government has the right to use that information you provide against you in criminal court - with legal immunity. You may say that only the written word can be used against you, but in fact it was just the thought alone that out you into that position.

    For example, in a discussion on an internet forum, you've come up with a scenario on how to assassinate the president. It's a hypothesis but it's worth speculation for the sake of your arguments. Now with such a law in place, the government could see you or your opponent as a potential threat (even if you say it's hypothetical) and use that information as proof that you intend to assassinate the president and without seeing a day in court you can land in prison or be blacklisted to enter the country at all.

    At some point down the line, every thought you have can become a criminal offense - should you put it in writing on FB, Twitter, a blog, etc. - if the government shall impose such a law, ultimately infringe on one of the rights most people in the western world are so proud of - free speech.
     

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